Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length

 
Advanced search

940571 Posts in 61865 Topics- by 14940 Members - Latest Member: plchappell
Jump to:  
The Trombone ForumPractice BreakFound on the 'Net(Moderators: RedHotMama, BFW) Cleaning Tbone slide with WD-40
Pages: [1]   Go Down
Print
Author Topic: Cleaning Tbone slide with WD-40  (Read 1379 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
WilliamSalverda

*
Offline Offline

Location: So. California, USA
Joined: Nov 11, 2011
Posts: 24

View Profile
« on: Dec 23, 2011, 12:13PM »

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kYXQhR999ss

 Eeek!
Logged
brucolli

*
Offline Offline

Location: Germany
Joined: Mar 9, 2011
Posts: 258
"Trombone - musikFabrik, Cologne"


View Profile
« Reply #1 on: Dec 23, 2011, 02:31PM »

There are many things wrong in this video, how many can you spot?
Logged

Bruce Collings
Rath Trombone Artist
www.musikfabrik.eu
boneagain
*
Offline Offline

Location: Richmond, VA
Joined: Aug 4, 2007
Posts: 1663

View Profile
« Reply #2 on: Dec 23, 2011, 02:54PM »

There are many things wrong in this video, how many can you spot?

Kind of breathtaking that someone who started as a trombonist and spent this much time in the business could do so many things to put an instrument and player at risk!

I find it distressing to think of how hard this makes it for a newbie to figure out if this is, or is not, good advice. The bio looks very good, and his presentation is excellent.  Not a clue as to how bad most of the advice is.

The contrast with this video is huge:
http://www.edwards-instruments.com/trombone/maintenance/slide_care.php

Just a few lowlights from the WD-40 video:
1) WD-40... should NOT be used where you will make a habit of breathing it in
2) BARE cleaning rod against ANY part of the slide... always buffer with some type of cloth cover
3) Run a half length of cloth into the outer slide... what happens if it gets jammed?
4) Loosen up crud with a brush and NOT FLUSH IT OUT... it it's going to be loosened, there should be flushing!
5) leaving the outer slide unheld at the angle he shows... if that slide is any good at all it will take almost NOTHING to send it banging to the floor.... straight up and down is a lot less risky.

There are actually more problems with this, and mis-statements.  Basically, because of good coverage in readily available trombone books and videos like the one from Edwards, I won't go on. 

But... how distressing!
Logged

Dave Adams
Staunch admirer of all who still make a living at this!
datguy
Alright on one side, all left on the other

*
Offline Offline

Location: Athens GA
Joined: May 21, 2008
Posts: 1487
"Curiously Intriguing"


View Profile
« Reply #3 on: Dec 23, 2011, 03:11PM »

Kind of breathtaking that someone who started as a trombonist and spent this much time in the business could do so many things to put an instrument and player at risk!

I find it distressing to think of how hard this makes it for a newbie to figure out if this is, or is not, good advice. The bio looks very good, and his presentation is excellent.  Not a clue as to how bad most of the advice is.

The contrast with this video is huge:
http://www.edwards-instruments.com/trombone/maintenance/slide_care.php

Just a few lowlights from the WD-40 video:
1) WD-40... should NOT be used where you will make a habit of breathing it in
2) BARE cleaning rod against ANY part of the slide... always buffer with some type of cloth cover
3) Run a half length of cloth into the outer slide... what happens if it gets jammed?
4) Loosen up crud with a brush and NOT FLUSH IT OUT... it it's going to be loosened, there should be flushing!
5) leaving the outer slide unheld at the angle he shows... if that slide is any good at all it will take almost NOTHING to send it banging to the floor.... straight up and down is a lot less risky.

There are actually more problems with this, and mis-statements.  Basically, because of good coverage in readily available trombone books and videos like the one from Edwards, I won't go on. 

But... how distressing!
Just going to cut and paste your comments ove to this poorly thought out video.
Logged

...make me know my end and what is the measure of my days; let me know how fleeting I am!
brucolli

*
Offline Offline

Location: Germany
Joined: Mar 9, 2011
Posts: 258
"Trombone - musikFabrik, Cologne"


View Profile
« Reply #4 on: Dec 24, 2011, 06:38AM »

Kind of breathtaking that someone who started as a trombonist and spent this much time in the business could do so many things to put an instrument and player at risk!

I find it distressing to think of how hard this makes it for a newbie to figure out if this is, or is not, good advice. The bio looks very good, and his presentation is excellent.  Not a clue as to how bad most of the advice is.

The contrast with this video is huge:
http://www.edwards-instruments.com/trombone/maintenance/slide_care.php

Just a few lowlights from the WD-40 video:
1) WD-40... should NOT be used where you will make a habit of breathing it in
2) BARE cleaning rod against ANY part of the slide... always buffer with some type of cloth cover
3) Run a half length of cloth into the outer slide... what happens if it gets jammed?
4) Loosen up crud with a brush and NOT FLUSH IT OUT... it it's going to be loosened, there should be flushing!
5) leaving the outer slide unheld at the angle he shows... if that slide is any good at all it will take almost NOTHING to send it banging to the floor.... straight up and down is a lot less risky.

There are actually more problems with this, and mis-statements.  Basically, because of good coverage in readily available trombone books and videos like the one from Edwards, I won't go on. 

But... how distressing!

Well spotted, not to mention holding one tube of the inner slide and wiping the other with the cloth. Maybe not too bad but still a good way to screw up the alignment of the slide. What makes me really cringe though, is when he puts the loose cloth on the rod in the outer slide and pulls it back and forth. The cloth will hardly move inside the slide because the rod will slip back and forth inside of it and then the possible scratches from the bare metal!
The Edwards video shows how it should be done.
Logged

Bruce Collings
Rath Trombone Artist
www.musikfabrik.eu
Sue
*
Offline Offline

Location: Central NJ
Joined: Sep 17, 2006
Posts: 442

View Profile
« Reply #5 on: Dec 24, 2011, 03:24PM »

The music at the beginning of the video says it all.

Now I think I understand why the trombones at my son's school always come back from the repair shop badly in need of a cleaning - unfortunately not all techs are competent.
Logged

A family of trombonists
HouBassTrombone

*
Offline Offline

Location: Houston, TX
Joined: Nov 19, 2008
Posts: 1891
"Just play because you love to."


View Profile
« Reply #6 on: Dec 24, 2011, 05:32PM »

The guys' Youtube account name is horn smasher... It is a joke. He destroys horns on purpose. At least I think this is a joke.  I hope so...
Logged

Why am I not practicing?????
jonathanmatos4

*
Offline Offline

Location: tulsa, oklahoma
Joined: Sep 27, 2007
Posts: 966

View Profile
« Reply #7 on: Dec 24, 2011, 06:43PM »

 Amazed

what is this? a parody of the proper way to clean and lubricate your slide? the guy should change his closing to say if you follow these instructions you will need to realign your slide monthly and have to re-plate it annually. however you may never notice because of the brain damage caused from inhaling WD-40.
Logged

jazz is more than music its a way of life.
boneagain
*
Offline Offline

Location: Richmond, VA
Joined: Aug 4, 2007
Posts: 1663

View Profile
« Reply #8 on: Dec 25, 2011, 06:54AM »

The music at the beginning of the video says it all.

Now I think I understand why the trombones at my son's school always come back from the repair shop badly in need of a cleaning - unfortunately not all techs are competent.

mmmm... I waited a while on this one.

Maintaining school horns is a pretty big prioritization issue.  If a school only has enough money to get the dents out, then what?  Along the same lines, if they can get the dents out of three horns AND have them properly cleaned afterward OR get the dents out of five horns, which way do they go?

I DO agree that not all techs are competent.  But we must also keep in mind that it is hard to keep a job if one does NOT do what management specifies.

If I ran a school system, I might feel it more important to have the tech do the dents removal (which students can NOT do... although they are very good at putting the dents in...) and not have the tech clean up too well after (which the students CAN do... and should know how to do along with playing of the instrument.)

It IS tough though.  Student A finishes with the horn, it goes to the dent doctor, then brand new student B gets the horn... maybe first lesson should be "The Compleat Cleaning of Hornes?"
Logged

Dave Adams
Staunch admirer of all who still make a living at this!
Sue
*
Offline Offline

Location: Central NJ
Joined: Sep 17, 2006
Posts: 442

View Profile
« Reply #9 on: Dec 25, 2011, 08:05AM »

I hear what your sayin', boneagain. I wouldn't even make an issue of it except I've seen the tags on the cases when they come back, and for what the district pays for removing "dents in slide" it could have been sent to the slide Dr. My son brings home the school bones in rotation to clean the slides. The last one, a Yamaha bass, had just come back from repair, over $100. for slide repair, and it was no better than before it went in. After a bath, I swabbed the outers and could still feel dents. After lubing it up it was passable but still rough.
However the tech in our immediate area who is competent and services a lot of the pros will not deal with school contracts any more. He says it takes too long to get paid, and he was tired of seeing the same horns come back again and again with obvious signs of neglect and abuse.
I don't know the answer, I just venting (again).
Logged

A family of trombonists
Pages: [1]   Go Up
Print
Jump to: