Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length

 
Advanced search

1087404 Posts in 72027 Topics- by 19247 Members - Latest Member: jasonsato1
Jump to:  
The Trombone ForumRecent Posts
Pages: [1] 2 3 4 5 6 ... 10
 1 
 on: Today at 12:47 AM 
Started by Graham Martin - Last post by vegasbound
Both batting line ups seem a bit brittle, with Steve Smith being the difference between the two sides, there is no doubt that England are missing the aggressive pace and batting of Ben Stokes!

 2 
 on: Today at 12:37 AM 
Started by Graham Martin - Last post by Graham Martin
Things have turned slightly in Australia's favour towards the end of day three, after a Steve Smith century putting Australia 26 runs ahead of England with a first innings total score of 328 all out.   

Then the Poms had to bat again and the Aussies started to make inroads before stumps, taking 2 wickets for 33 runs, giving England an overall lead of seven runs.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-11-25/smith-century-puts-australia-in-box-seat-after-day-three/9193570

 3 
 on: Today at 12:27 AM 
Started by hyperbolica - Last post by Steerpike
Good to hear

 4 
 on: Yesterday at 11:34 PM 
Started by mr.deacon - Last post by Burgerbob
Valves are definitely closer. Can't tell the bell size... Could be either one. I always assumed all the early ones with the close valves were 9.5, but...

 5 
 on: Yesterday at 11:31 PM 
Started by robcat2075 - Last post by Burgerbob
Then it wouldn't be the way I play.

Then maybe it's time to change it.

Want to sound good for another ten years, and then have no ears to continue? Or sound just as good for another 40 or 50? I honestly don't understand your position on this.

I got my first set in 2011. I hated them. I couldn't hear anything and it made me too aware of my oral cavity, so I pinched and tired myself out.

So then I used them constantly, especially in practice but also in any loud performance situation, to get used to it. I play a lot better now than I did then, that's for sure.

 6 
 on: Yesterday at 10:53 PM 
Started by mr.deacon - Last post by mr.deacon
https://www.ebay.com/itm/Holton-TR180-Bass-Trombone-Bb-F-w-Optional-D-Slide-562-Bore-Vintage-1967/172996966514?hash=item28476c3872:g:bncAAOSwUchaGFiC

I just saw this pop up on ebay. For sure one of the early ones. Owner says 1967 vintage. He also says it has a 10" bell but considering the vintage it could be one of the handful of the 169 style TR180's floating around.

Note the roller triggers instead of the Glantz bar. Also note... the string linkage... I've never seen that on a Holton before... maybe aftermarket?

The price is still cheap!

 7 
 on: Yesterday at 10:18 PM 
Started by dsmndng - Last post by Larry Preston Roberson
I think Conn does sell these as repair parts if you don't have any luck.

Below is the link to the part Conn-Selmer repair parts site. Just click on "Login as Guest". You have to be a registered user to actually order though—so possibly be a dealer/repairmen. But at least it gives you the part number you need and it's cool to look at all the Bach, Conn, Holton, King, etc. parts.
https://parts.conn-selmer.com/products/part/16147/tm33647ela

 8 
 on: Yesterday at 10:17 PM 
Started by robcat2075 - Last post by Andrew Meronek
And not just the violas in front of the trombones, either

New research: All orchestra players should wear ear plugs



My crit would be the framing of the discussion as if it were primarily a professional symphony musician problem, whereas it's a problem that starts as early as 5th grade beginner bands where some students' ears are placed just inches in front of trumpet and trombone bells.

Also, a criticism: the level at which sound causes hearing damage is a bit more complex than briefly described in that abstract. 90Db can generally cause harm, but at a sustained 90Db over 12 hours. Higher decibels cause damage after shorter durations. And there is individual variation, although it's obviously a good idea to err on the low side for those people who are more prone to loudness-induced hearing damage.

 9 
 on: Yesterday at 10:08 PM 
Started by robcat2075 - Last post by Andrew Meronek
That's the issue. I only hear the horrible sound from within my head, due to the ear plugs, and that changes the way I play. I know trying to correct for it is 100% wrong, but I have no way to know what the sound is in real time without a monitor, and since I play based on what I hear and feel ... it is not practical at all. Impossible really.

I came to the conclusion a while ago that in an environment where earplugs are really needed, no amount of beautiful tone really matters, because that's not going to come through. It's best to just wear the ear plugs, and play with good time, pitch, and articulation, and ignore tone.

I also observed that in bad, loud environments, I sometimes hear better with earplugs than without. Less distortion effects (specifically due to loudness) on the eardrum and the rest of the amplification mechanisms in the ear.

I'm also done with going to rock/pop concerts. Some of those things get so loud that ear plugs don't even protect my ears enough.

I'm also highly suspicious of movie theatres. Some of them have really stupid, loud sound setups, and some of them are OK.

Because my work occasionally takes me to factories here and there, I keep a couple sets of earplugs for factory environments. Even a moderate din in a factory can really tire out the ears without protection after a few hours.

 10 
 on: Yesterday at 09:59 PM 
Started by robcat2075 - Last post by harrison.t.reed
Then it wouldn't be the way I play.

Pages: [1] 2 3 4 5 6 ... 10