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Teaching & Learning => Practice Room => Topic started by: trb420 on Jan 11, 2017, 07:50PM



Title: Airy tone
Post by: trb420 on Jan 11, 2017, 07:50PM
So when I play, I often get a lot of air in my sound after I've played for a little bit and start to get tired. Granted, playing in a room unobstructed I sound fine (behind the bell) but playing into a stand I hear a lot of air, or fuzz, coming out. This isn't as much of an issue in the low-mid register as it is in the upper mid register and higher. How should I fix this? I recently switched to a 5G (some months ago) from many years on a 6.5AL and the airy sound is less noticeable on the 6.5, but the 5G isn't inhibiting my range or anything so I don't think the mouthpiece is the root of the problem. As far as I know, I don't have any fundamental embouchure problems but it could probably be refined or tweaked in some areas. Any ideas or exercises to help get the air out of my sound? Thanks


Title: Re: Airy tone
Post by: trb420 on Jan 11, 2017, 07:54PM
Just to clarify, when my sound has room to resonate I sound fine but in small rooms or into a stand I notice a lot of airiness in my tone


Title: Re: Airy tone
Post by: Doug Elliott on Jan 12, 2017, 12:28AM
Some people's sound is airy up close.  Ignore it.


Title: Re: Airy tone
Post by: bonenick on Jan 12, 2017, 01:30AM
As Doug poined out, it may be natural, some players just have it. Other possibility is to have somekind of leakeage in your embouchure (I am not really convinced). Anyway, small rooms gives you greater feedback. You can use that to your own advantage practice wise. Use it to hear better the defficiencies in your articulation and sound. You can bring to to an extreme by standing in a corner of the room and playing in to it (as opposed when trombone bell directed into the center of the room). That was an exercise that the late Maurice Andre was giving to his students when articulation issue is presented.


Title: Re: Airy tone
Post by: svenlarsson on Jan 12, 2017, 02:53AM
Some players play with an airy tone and like it so. Many players can play with an airy tone as a way to change the sound just momentarelly.
Some players se the airy tone as a problem. I can make my tone more airy then what it usually is by flexing the muscles in the center of my embouchure.


Title: Re: Airy tone
Post by: Geezerhorn on Jan 12, 2017, 04:57AM
Then don't play into your stand unless you are directed to or you want to hear that airy sound for some odd reason.

...Geezer


Title: Re: Airy tone
Post by: timothy42b on Jan 12, 2017, 05:23AM
Some people's sound is airy up close.  Ignore it.

At the Army trombone workshop a couple years ago, there was a pro playing with fabulous sound, except when his bell pointed right at me and I could hear some air and fuzz in it.  I was pretty close, someone farther back probably didn't hear that at all. 


Title: Re: Airy tone
Post by: Pre59 on Jan 12, 2017, 08:00AM
An airy tone can be attractive in a slow melody or ballad situation. I'd get this effect by loosening my embouchure a little and a little more air, so maybe you could try a little more focus with a tighter "M" shape and see how you get on, if it doesn't work out, no harm done.


Title: Re: Airy tone
Post by: trb420 on Jan 12, 2017, 01:46PM
An airy tone can be attractive in a slow melody or ballad situation. I'd get this effect by loosening my embouchure a little and a little more air, so maybe you could try a little more focus with a tighter "M" shape and see how you get on, if it doesn't work out, no harm done.

I don't know if we're thinking of the same sound concept but by airy I mean fuzzy and unrefined. I can't see it being desired in any performance situation. Oddly enough, I tried to focus my embouchure and make my aperture smaller and the problem is less severe.


Title: Re: Airy tone
Post by: bonenick on Jan 12, 2017, 02:01PM
is the fuzzy sound accompanied ocassionally by double buzz or phoney intonation?


Title: Re: Airy tone
Post by: Pre59 on Jan 12, 2017, 02:37PM
Oddly enough, I tried to focus my embouchure and make my aperture smaller and the problem is less severe.

Is that not the answer then? Give it a little time and see how you get on, and don't be scared to experiment as long as you haven't got anything big coming up soon. These relatively small changes may feel big, but that's because there are so many more nerves around the mouth area. There's a page in the Bill Watrous book that deals with the aperture, also in "Practice with the experts", Murray Mceachern has an exercise for getting the chops back in after a break, that's about aperture as well.