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1048531 Posts in 69884 Topics- by 18074 Members - Latest Member: TromboneMom2016
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1  Creation and Performance / Musical Miscellany / Re: 1st trombone player who isn't... what to do? on: Today at 09:40 AM

10 trombones in an orchestra? Whew!


I count 13 (plus 3 basses). Where in the world is there a community, or professional, for that matter, orchestra, or band, with that many trombones? Oops, never mind, I see. In my own back yard.
2  Teaching & Learning / Beginners and Returning Trombonists / Re: playing scales without moving the slide... on: Yesterday at 08:54 AM
We have an exercise called "pitch benders" where we start on a note and see how far we can bend the pitch before we slide into the next partial.  It's used to make sure we have control over the pitch.  My guess is that McChesney can pitch bend nearly an octave.

Having this capability can be useful when you put the slide in the wrong position and still have to hit the note Evil  (and I've done this a few times Yeah, RIGHT. ).

I've used the opposite, where I try to see how long I can keep the pitch centered while I move the slide in one direction or another. Both are good exercises for strengthening the embouchure.
3  Practice Break / Purely Politics / Re: What Trump's election means for the rest of the world on: Dec 06, 2016, 07:45PM

when did you start trusting Palin?  Amazed


You've heard the quote about blind squirrels, right?
4  Practice Break / Purely Politics / Re: What Trump's election means for the rest of the world on: Dec 05, 2016, 02:21PM

Does he have the authority to promise Carrier $700,000 in incentives, even after he is sworn in as president? Or is he promising that he will use his influence to move congress to make those incentives?


Jeez, Dusty, really? You really don't know it was Pence who promised Carrier all the incentives out of Indiana's tax money? It's the reason he didn't, as most previously electees have, immediately resign his governor's seat on the day after the election. He couldn't be sure his predecessor would go through with the deal.
5  Practice Break / Purely Politics / Re: What Trump's election means for the rest of the world on: Dec 05, 2016, 04:59AM
Well, the truth comes out! Or, does it? Whether or not the Trump organization was looking to bujild in Taiwan, this is absolutely indicative of the optics we will be subjected to for the next 4 years. We are looking down the barrel of a third word, banana-republic style kleptocracy. We can only pray it doesn''t blow up the world.

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/asia/donald-trump-organisation-taiwan-hotel-investment-china-a7454691.html
6  Practice Break / Purely Politics / Re: What Trump's election means for the rest of the world on: Dec 04, 2016, 05:03AM
Since 1979 the US has recognized Bejing as the capital of the only China and has had no official diplomatic ties to TaiPei. As I said before, this signals something UGE, but it's hard to know exactly what it is.
7  Practice Break / Purely Politics / Re: What Trump's election means for the rest of the world on: Dec 03, 2016, 04:38PM
Who made this infamous phone call?  Confused

Irrelevant. He would have been better advised to take a cal from you or me than that one. He made a massive statement by taking that call. He is either stating the accepted world order is under serious threat of instability, or he is stating he has no clue what the real world order is. Either way, This is a BIGLY issue. It's UUGE. THere is no bigger issue. Trump has great issues.......
8  Practice Break / Purely Politics / Re: Wake Up, America: Take 3 on: Dec 02, 2016, 07:23AM
Took Thanksgiving week off. Now that the dust is settling......

Drain the Swamp

Well, as far as I can tell, the President-elects concept of “draining the swamp” is that you first fill it with the biggest, most predatory snakes and alligators you can find. His list of appointees and nominees provide little hope he is going to govern in a manner any different than he campaigned.

The appointment of Steve Bannon as Presidential Adviser is truly ugly. Many have called him a racist or white supremacist. I suspect he is neither. He is something even worse.

Bannon appears an amoral, “ends justify the means” actor in the mold of Dick Cheney. His situational ethics are what allowed him to use the Alt-Right as a weapon to stir up hate and resentment to get an angry base to the polls. They were nothing but a tool to someone who has actually said, “Darkness is good. Dick Cheney. Darth Vader. Satan. That’s power”. This is the man in control of the President-elect’s right ear.

Whispering in his left ear is his choice for National Security Adviser, Gen. Michael Flynn. He has a reputation for being both an excellent intelligence officer, having run Defense Intelligence Agency (not well, he was fired by Director of National Intelligence, James Clapper in 2014), and as an erratic and abusive superior who is “right-wing nutty” according to Colin Powell. By my reading, he seems to be quite good at tactics, but is sorely lacking in capacity for strategic thought.

Flynn is certainly, as one would expect of a warrior general, aggressive. HE has tweeted “Fear of Muslims is RATIONAL”, and linked to a site claiming “Islam… wants 80% of humanity enslaved or exterminated.

He’s been chummy with Vladimir Putin, and rejected the consensus of the intelligence community that Russia was actively hacking to influence the outcome of our election. Neither he nor Bannon require the checks and balances of Senate confirmation, no matter the rubber stamp that is likely to be in this administration. Scary stuff.

The President-elect’s choices for positions requiring that rubber stamp are no better. An Attorney General who was unable to achieve conformation by a GOP committee for a judgeship because of racial issues in his past, a Sec. of Education who has spent a lifetime working to privatize public education, and a Sec. Treasury who made billions forclosing on over 36,000 Americans in the housing crisis.

The swamp has got a whole bunch of new predators.
9  Practice Break / Purely Politics / Re: The election on: Nov 30, 2016, 04:33AM
Here's a real news story that won't go viral, because it's the new, sad, normal.

Short version: elderly couple (and thousands of others) lost their home to a deceptive foreclosure operation run by Donald Trump's likely* pick for Treasury Secretary.  Don't miss the painful, ironic punch line.


Trump's Potential Treasury Secretary Headed A 'Foreclosure Machine'



*latest news... He IS the Treasury Secretary choice.



Well, there's a great example of folks getting what they asked for.
10  Practice Break / Purely Politics / Re: Understanding isn't the problem ... on: Nov 29, 2016, 10:03AM

 It's one thing to characterize your experiences etc. It's another to pretend that they are THE problem.


Actually, in my experience, it's not pretending, they ARE THE problem. And, I have an open enough, intellectually capable enough, and well-read enough, mind to grasp that, to a great extent, they ARE THE problem for this country and the world.
11  Practice Break / Purely Politics / Re: The election on: Nov 29, 2016, 05:04AM

"This is classic conspiracy logic: the absence of evidence is evidence of just how insidious it is. The failure of an event to turn out as expected is presented as evidence of some hidden hand at work, some deliberate interference."


WOW! You just described, to perfection, your, and 45% of AMerica's, 25 year love/ hate affair with the Clintons. Nice to see you finally come clean.
12  Practice Break / Purely Politics / Re: The election on: Nov 28, 2016, 10:14AM
Perhaps they are afraid that it will be found that thousands, or tens of thousands, or hundreds of thousands, of provisional ballots cast by folks who had ID's GOP voter suppression efforts didn't want to accept, but were perfectly valid, were thrown out without being counted. Or the same happened with absentee ballots. Or that several hundred thousand voters were improperly scrubbed from the rolls and not allowed to vote. I don't think it is computer hacking that is the biggest issue with these recounts at all.

Again, I don't believe it is hacking that is the main point of the recount efforts.
13  Practice Break / Purely Politics / Re: El Presidente on: Nov 28, 2016, 10:09AM
Yes, I'm sure these folks were really chomping at the bit to spill the secrets on Hillary et al... lol

Once someone is granted immunity, they are subject to contempt of court and/ or perjury charges should they refuse to cooperate. Don't remember any of them being so charged, so........
14  Practice Break / Purely Politics / Re: El Presidente on: Nov 28, 2016, 09:07AM
It's not a fake news story that the FBI granted immunity to Hillary's entire closest staff, then took possession of all their laptops, PCs too probably, and then didn't seek to have any of them turn on Hillary. In affect, destroying any key evidence that could have proven bad for Hillary. Yeah that kind of investigation. Others, she never answered any questions other than, I don't know, I don't remember, etc. blah blah blah.

So, if you consider that as true investigations, then I guess you're right. She has had her fair share of investigations. LOL!

The FBI treated Gen Patraeus a little differently, if I remember correctly.

What happy excrement of equine origin. All of Hillary's closest staff were granted immunity, which required they spill their guts of any and everything they could possibly have known. And, yet, even with all those guts on the floor, NADA, BUPKIS, ZERO, ZILCH, GOOSE EGG, NOTHING. Dusty, you post some really stupid crap sometimes, but this is definitely the stupidest.
15  Practice Break / Purely Politics / Re: The election on: Nov 28, 2016, 04:38AM
Perhaps they are afraid that it will be found that thousands, or tens of thousands, or hundreds of thousands, of provisional ballots cast by folks who had ID's GOP voter suppression efforts didn't want to accept, but were perfectly valid, were thrown out without being counted. Or the same happened with absentee ballots. Or that several hundred thousand voters were improperly scrubbed from the rolls and not allowed to vote. I don't think it is computer hacking that is the biggest issue with these recounts at all.
16  Practice Break / Purely Politics / Re: Understanding isn't the problem ... on: Nov 27, 2016, 07:46PM
Here's a fun map:
http://demographics.coopercenter.org/DotMap/index.html

We just really aren't much of an integrated country.

That's freakin' cool!
17  Practice Break / Purely Politics / Re: Well ... damn. on: Nov 27, 2016, 07:39PM
A side point is there is no major reason for the government to know exactly how much one has unless they were anticipating some sort of "civil war" or similar situation.


I call "absolute ecrement of bovine origin". When the Second Amendment was written it was absolutely imperative for whoever was in command of the local "well regulated militia" to know with certainty what each and every member of the local community possessed and was likely to show up with should the local "indigenous" (native Americans) folks show up in an aggressive mood and need to be repelled. That clause of the amendment pretty much became obsolete when a standing army was created, in contradiction to the wishes of the framers of our Constitution, and the National Guard became the "well-regulated militia". Registration of firearms is certainly within the purview of the second amendment as written.
18  Practice Break / Purely Politics / Re: Understanding isn't the problem ... on: Nov 26, 2016, 07:26AM
Nebraska?

Let me explain my position: I currently live in the suburb of a relatively medium-sized city in the Midwest, so I can realte to people like Norsworthy and Jakeway to some extent. I see it everyday in my classmates, their parents, teachers, etc. and this was evident in our county voting map on the 8th. However, while I live in a suburb, I spend a lot of time visiting rural places (mostly in the Midwest). For example, a majority of the family on my mother's side is from Nebraska, so I'm in Nebraska at least 2 or 3 times per year. This means not only do I meet a lot of family (liberal, conservative, city-dwellers, farmers, you name it), but I've gotten to know a lot of their friends, girlfriends, neighbors, employees, etc. I also have family in Iowa, Missouri, Kansas, Texas, and Arkansas as far as I know. Granted, I know most of those aren't the "deep red" as Baron likes to call it, but I feel that I've gotten to know a fair range of people in most of these places.

A majority of my father's immediate family comes from a small town in northern Iowa, made up of mostly farmers, small business owners (including my grandfather and two of my uncles), and the like. After visiting several times every year, every year of my life, I think it's fair to say that I know about 50% of this town. By the way, 99% white and about 50% over the age of 40 as of 2000, and from my experience predominately Christian. The aforementioned relatives are also relatively wealthy; my grandparents own multiple houses (four I believe). Based on the people I know, I see no reason to believe that these people are racist or anti-Muslim, or whatever. My grandfather, for example, probably hires more latinos than anyone else in town for his construction company. Most of the people struggling to get by in this town are also white, not minorities as you might expect. But this is just one town, so  Don't know

Now, just to talk my grandpa up a bit: he dropped out of high school at 17 to marry my grandma (who proceeded to finish high school, but never pursued further education), then began immediately working for a local contractor in town. About 10 years later, he started his own company, which has thrived to this day. According to multiple sources, my grandparents are some of the wealthiest people in the area (can't confirm, they don't like to talk about money). This all just goes to show, my grandfather rose from nothing (in a family of seven kids), with no high school diploma, to build a successful business and succeed despite the modern economy. No amount of hardship can keep you from succeeding, he proved that to me. These are the values I was raised by; he inspired my opinions. Also, he is the perfect example for the stereotypical conservative today, but I can assure you is nothing like the man described in the article.

Being from Iowa, there is a 50/50% chance your grandparents don't fit the model outlined in the article. But, the truth remains that better than 50% of the folks in "flyover" country consistently vote for economic policies which are directly counter to their own interests. Supply-side trickle down policies and corporate friendly tax codes have been the single biggest factor in the stagnation and deterioration of the economies of those red states, and yet they continue to vote in the party for whom those policies are gospel. Add in the "Christian" social aspect, and virtually everything the writer claims is accurate for a majority of the folks outside of urban centers in this country. Understand that is a spectrum. It is less true for some than others, but it is true to some extent for virtually everyone of the folks that voted for Trump to win this election.
19  Practice Break / Purely Politics / Re: The election on: Nov 26, 2016, 05:59AM
You are the one who is claiming that the entire last 8 years were a total waste and that we are in much worse shape than when Shrub left office.

Bush Jr. left us with record debt due to two reckless wars and in a Depression to boot.  When Obama came into office we were losing jobs at nearly 750,000 per month.  During the Obama administration:

o  We went from losing 750,000 jobs a month to gaining about 200,000 per month.  Is it great?  No.  But it's better than it was.

o  20 million people got health insurance that couldn't get it before.  It's not 100% coverage but it's better than it was.  Incidentally, Obamacare was based on a Republican program in Massachusetts nicknamed Romneycare.  He chose that over a single payer system in the hopes he could convince a few Republicans to vote for it (they didn't).

o  He negotiated a deal with Iran that delayed their implementation of a nuclear weapon by 25 years.  If this agreement hadn't been signed, they would probably be within a year or two of making a nuclear weapon and obtaining the system that can deliver it to Israel.

o  He was part of a world congress to reduce greenhouse gases so we won't flood all the coastal cities when the polar ice caps melt.  There may be an underlying warming trend in our environment, but we humans have most definitely accelerated it.

o  He was working to negotiate a trade deal with all of the Pacific Rim nations (with the exception of Russia and China) that would include pollution controls and fair wages as well as open trade borders.  If there isn't a big labor savings by building in Asia there would be less tendency to ship American jobs over there.  Incidentally, a lot of jobs lost are lost to automation; not to "coolies" in China.

He wasn't perfect, but I think he did a creditable job and doesn't deserve the excoriation you have leveled.

Boy, there you go again, getting all factual. Facts were irrelevant in the campaign, and they remain irrelevant in its aftermath.

"Obama said his policies are on the ballot, and by and large he got creamed!" - Yeah, the -2.2Million, and climbing, -1.5%, and climbing, popular vote "victory" was real massacre.
20  Practice Break / Purely Politics / Re: The election on: Nov 25, 2016, 01:20PM

  Granted Trump does not seem to actually be a Christian but many of his supporters are. 


Um, no. Many of his supporters claim to be Christian, but no true follower of the teachings of Christ could ever support Trump. Period.
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