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990139 Posts in 66004 Topics- by 16362 Members - Latest Member: goombay
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61  Practice Break / Polls / Re: Confederate Flag- Good, Bad, Ugly, or what? on: Jun 19, 2015, 05:31PM
Well, there are few nuances worth considering, such as "intent" and "historical context". There's not much of a movement to tear down the Washington Memorial (1888) or Jefferson Memorial (1943) or remove these gentlemen's busts from Mt. Rushmore (1925), because Americans have essentially decided that their invaluable contributions to the young nation outweigh the uncomfortable fact that they were both slaveowners.

We don't feel quite the same way about Lee, Davis, and Jackson; this is why Mt. Rushmore is a U.S. National Memorial and Stone Mountain isn't.

But when the state of South Carolina decides, in anno domini 2000, that the Confederate flag will remain in front of the statehouse in perpetuity, only to be removed by a 2/3 legislative vote, it's really hard to interpret that as anything other than a giant middle finger to most of the country.
I agree.   But that's why we have states and not one massive country.  They can keep the flag out there.  It's their state. And u think it's awesome that states have their own laws not dictated by Washington.
62  Practice Break / Polls / Re: Confederate Flag- Good, Bad, Ugly, or what? on: Jun 19, 2015, 04:02PM
This is an easy one. It is bad, ugly and offensive. It represents a societal view that slavery and oppression are fine, and a section of the good old US went to war for the right to continue the practice. To celebrate the symbol of that shameful piece of the country's past is ugly. Since it is directly offensive to African/American people today (an assumption, sure, but a pretty safe one) the flag should not be displayed, any more than other odious symbols such as a nazi flag, a one-finger salute, or an 'up yours' to your neighbor. Why antagonize others needlessly? This celebration of 'confederacy' makes me feel ashamed.
What about statues of Confederate soldiers?  What about statues of former slave owners? And on and on.
Shall we burn books too?
63  Practice Break / Polls / Re: Confederate Flag- Good, Bad, Ugly, or what? on: Jun 19, 2015, 03:28PM
I'm not denying the possibility that he has some form of mental illness. Rather, I'm questioning the immediate assumption - before there's any medical evidence made public - that he's any more mentally ill than any other criminal (car thieves, domestic abusers, insider traders, you name it.) Mental illness is, at its most abstracted level, the inability of the brain to accurately interpret/process the information and stimuli gathered by the senses. Given the sources where we now know this guy was getting a lot of his information (Old South African and Rhodesian flags are big sellers on white supremacist websites, where the statistically dubious assertion that black people "are taking over and raping our women" is assumed to be as obvious as the sun rising in the east), it seems he actually processed the information fairly well. A big part of the problem, of course, was the information itself.

Nidal Hassan, on the other hand, might well have been mentally ill, but that's certainly not the first way people described him after his crimes.
I'm just saying that it turns out, frequently, that these mass killers do have some form of mental illness.
64  Practice Break / Polls / Re: Confederate Flag- Good, Bad, Ugly, or what? on: Jun 19, 2015, 02:59PM
This is news to me  Don't know
Me too. The flag is just historical to me.
65  Practice Break / Polls / Re: Confederate Flag- Good, Bad, Ugly, or what? on: Jun 19, 2015, 02:58PM
I'm sorry, but this is utter balderdash. What makes people think this individual was mentally ill? Does he have any history of psychiatric treatment that would indicate as much? If so, I haven't yet heard of it.

Millions of Americans do, or have, or will, wrestle with some form of mental illness. Everything from depression and anxiety attacks, to schizophrenia or severe bipolar disorder. The vast majority of these people pose no violent threat to society, and are much more likely to be the victims of violent crime, than the perpetrators.

A dorky-looking white kid commits mass murder, and the first words out of many pundits seems to always be "mentally ill". But had he been a different race or religion, the words might have been "thug" or "terrorist". (Evidently dark-skinned people aren't given the luxury of the "mentally ill" assumption...)

There are mentally ill people, and there are violent people. Some are both. Most are neither. But the two should not be lazily conflated.
Actually some news media are saying he has a history of mental illness. We don't know for sure yet.  And most of the recent mass killers have had a history of mental illness.
Arron Alexis, Nidal Hassan, Seung-Hui Cho, and Jiverly Wong are not white by the way.
66  Practice Break / Polls / Re: Confederate Flag- Good, Bad, Ugly, or what? on: Jun 19, 2015, 01:03PM
It is just a flag.  But it means different things to different people.  Just like any flag or pennant or...
His hate is not based on a flag. Nutjobs will be nutjobs with or without a flag. It's based on what he has learned and believes.  And perhaps an abnormal psychological issue.  There's a picture of him wearing a Rhodesian flag and a South African flag from the time of apartheid.
67  Teaching & Learning / Practice Room / Re: Lip plumping on: Jun 18, 2015, 08:45AM
It's a bad idea and if you did it you would need to have it redone over and over again.  So a. more injections and cost and b. It would be different every time. Bad idea.
68  Creation and Performance / The Healthy Trombonist / Re: Stiff jaw. on: Jun 11, 2015, 08:59PM
I can't chew gum without my TMJ acting up.
Dont chew gum.  Seriously.  I'm not trying to be Henny Youngman.
69  Creation and Performance / The Healthy Trombonist / Re: Wisdom Teeth Removal? on: May 28, 2015, 08:07AM
Like others I'll add the caveat that "I'm not a medical professional but" ... I've heard that it is best to get this wisdom tooth extraction done before age 21. When removing the wisdom teeth there is a risk that a connecting nerve that affects some of the muscles we trombonists use might be severed. As one grows older, so does the nerve, and hence the risk becomes higher.

Here's a link I found on the aforementioned:
http://www.animated-teeth.com/wisdom_teeth/t7-wisdom-tooth-paresthesia.htm
"While muscle function is not affected, the sensory changes experienced can be difficult to deal with. They may affect speech or chewing function, or interfere with activities such as playing a musical instrument."
Ok fellas.  The nerve ( the 5th cranial nerve) that can be damaged is mainly a sensory nerve.  Paresthesia and  dysesthesia can occur.  There is a branch that is a motor nerve that goes to some neck muscles under your chin. But motor function is mainly the 7th cranial nerve. There are good reasons to have wizzies  taken out  and there are not so good reasons.  When looking at a radiograph there is a grading system as to where the tooth is in relation to the inferior alveolar nerve (the nerve that innervates your teeth and gives sensation to your lower lip and parts of your chin.)  That's where the risk is evaluated for possible nerve damage. 
Age only comes in to play in recovery and root development not the "age" of the nerves.  Young people recover faster and undeveloped teeth are, in some ways, easier to remove than fully developed teeth. I like wizzies to be removed before 25 years old.  But only if nescessary.  There is some controversy about whether they need to be removed.  I recommend extraction only if they are erupted and the patient can't clean them adequately, if they affect or have the potential to affect the 2nd molars, if they are misplaced into the cheek muscle, if they are through the the gums but get stuck or if there is a pathology associated with them.  If they are fully impacted I usually leave them but the controversy is that leaving them has the potential to possibly have a cyst or other pathology develop later in life.  Rare but possible.
I've been a dentist for 23 years and a trombone player for 42 years.
70  Creation and Performance / The Healthy Trombonist / Re: Wisdom Teeth Removal? on: May 27, 2015, 10:19PM
Ask your dentist what the expected healing time will be and if your teeth will shift. Instead of a bunch of boneheads on the internet. Except for the down time it probably won't be a big deal. I didn't play for about 40years after having my wisdom teeth out and I think my range is better. (I don't think that's a causal relationship.)
DRB
Seola Creek.
:)
71  Creation and Performance / The Healthy Trombonist / Re: Wisdom Teeth Removal? on: May 27, 2015, 06:41PM
Having teeth removed can change your jaw set and therefore embouchure. It depends on whether or not your wisdom teeth are critical (by length mainly) in setting your closed jaw position. Since wisdom teeth are usually lower than the molars, and I assume in your case probably impacted, this is not likely. But unfortunately not many dentists know anything about the affect of their work on your embouchure.

A couple of older pros on this forum always keep a cast of their teeth.

At your age you should not have too many problems but the older you get the more critical on embouchure is the removal of teeth - for a number of reasons. Eeek!
I must disagree.  Wisdom teeth won't affect your "jaw set" whether you have them or not. So your embouchure will not change. Your closed jaw position, in a vertical dimension, is dictated by posterior teeth whether you have 20 posterior teeth or 2 posterior teeth and by your anterior teeth in a horizontal or anterior posterior dimension.  This is whether they are erupted or impacted. Wisdom teeth are 99% of the time, disposable. 
Yes, get a set of models of your teeth.  If you lose teeth they can be helpful for the dentist to reconstruct your dentition to a previous point. Because yes, not many dentists even know what an embouchure is. Clever
72  Creation and Performance / The Healthy Trombonist / Re: Popped blood vessel in LIP?!?! on: May 21, 2015, 04:35PM
The concern and reason for not playing after wisdom teeth are removed is that the additional air pressure can push bacteria into the new cavity in your tissue where the tooth was.

Don't play for two weeks after surgery.  Just don't.
Hmmm.  Haven't heard that before. :-0 :)
I tell my patients not to play for a why because it will hurt. Not only the extraction site but also the muscles will be tight and will sometimes be in spasm. Relax and ice till you feel better.
73  Practice Break / Polls / Re: Health Insurance on: May 18, 2015, 05:17PM
Then may you can try to enlighten us, rather then just speaking down and saying we just know nothing. Or the constant deflection. Clever

Aside from litigation, what options does a patient have when a doctor screws up? Both to collect damages, and to try to help prevent it from happening again?
You act like a child.  I've tried to explain it to you but it would be like you explaining computer code to me. You obviously don't get it. You can't even comprehend what I've posted here.
74  Practice Break / Polls / Re: Health Insurance on: May 18, 2015, 05:16PM
I read a great article about malpractice, that basically presented as a big, expensive lottery. There's not much access to reasonable relief from poor care, but some people go to trial and hit the jackpot.

In the absence of anything else, it's the only brake on bad medicine. Maybe Yelp will take its place.
Why would you say "In the absence of anything else, it's the only brake on bad medicine."  Of course.  In absence of anything else. Don't know
There is plenty of "anything else" though.
75  Practice Break / Polls / Re: Health Insurance on: May 18, 2015, 04:58PM
I'm not negating the value of your experience--in terms of personal experience, it's superior to mine as a patient. But even people right in the thick of it can be a bit like blind men with elephants. One of the things I like about Gawande (and other writers like Jerome Groopman) is the ability to process a lot of empirical date outside of his experience through his medical perspective. Even though he's at a higher level than most MDs, he readily admits being surprised by some of it, but his perspective makes it easier for him to put it all together and he doesn't seem to approach it with much of a professional or political bias. I wish NYer would publish one book or series with all of its writing by MDs (Oliver Sacks has some good stuff in there too).
I understand and I have no doubt it exists but some here get all bent out of shape and exaggerate on things they don't know very much about.  It's silly.
76  Practice Break / Polls / Re: Health Insurance on: May 18, 2015, 04:56PM
Yes, and continuing.
The question I am repeatedly asking is the issue of contention. If there has been a misunderstanding, that happens. And fine. Let's try again. When a doctor screws up, what measures does the patient have to seek damages and try to prevent it from happening again outside of lawyering up?

Because all tort reform seems to promise is to cut down on a patient's ability to improve the system through penalty, and to seek damages.
You show me where I stated what you say I said and I'll answer.  Otherwise have a good evening.
77  Practice Break / Polls / Re: Health Insurance on: May 18, 2015, 04:48PM
Nice deflection. You are indeed learning the art that is Bvb.

And again, I ask when a doctor screws up, what measures does the patient have to seek damages and try to prevent it from happening again outside of lawyering up?
Deflection?  Like you asking the same question over and over so you don't have to quote me accurately.  You keep stating I said something but you can't prove it. I would correct myself if you just quote me correctly. Good grief.
78  Practice Break / Polls / Re: Health Insurance on: May 18, 2015, 04:33PM
Really? Are you trying to copy Bvb right now, and run away from your own points?


Then I ask again, when a doctor screws up, what measures does the patient have to seek damages and try to prevent it from happening again outside of lawyering up?
Show me where I said any of that? I asked you to and you still haven't.
 Take a nap. Reread. Then try again.
79  Practice Break / Polls / Re: Health Insurance on: May 18, 2015, 04:28PM
Forget your words already?

Determining if the doctor is truly at fault is why we have the court system. If they wish to settle and not go through that, that is their decision. And they will pay for it. And at this point, you have completely failed to show your assertion that suing a doctor for malpractice will not improve anything (when the tort system is specifically designed to do that, and Paul commented above), and why the responsibility is on the patient to know everything and not the provider who went through a decade of schools to know it. Somehow, even forgetting the law in the process. Doesn't speak much for your "great knowledge" on the subject.
Then it would help if you do not make them.
Never said any of what you just stated.
I think you need a nap. You're making errors and misquoting and misunderstanding all over the place.  Must be frustrating. Huh?
Go back and reread everything I posted without your "My doctor is trying to screw me" glasses.
80  Practice Break / Polls / Re: Health Insurance on: May 18, 2015, 04:12PM
Really? Says the man who blames the patients for suing doctors when they are negligent, saying it's really just the patient's fault?

Suing a provider for malpractice is the only form of recompense a patient has in a situation where they otherwise suffer all of the consequences.
Your reading comprehension is suspect.  Quote, in its entirety, where I said that.
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