Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length

 
Advanced search

979769 Posts in 64990 Topics- by 15945 Members - Latest Member: royboy
Jump to:  
  Show Posts
Pages: 1 2 3 [4] 5 6 7 8 9 ... 496
61  Practice Break / Purely Politics / Re: Religion Matters on: Apr 10, 2015, 10:46AM
So, would it be appropriate to end a government-owned answering machine greeting with, "Praise god"?

Is that religion neutral?

What about, "Praise gods" to cover all possible gods.


No.  Too religious.
62  Practice Break / Purely Politics / Re: Religion Matters on: Apr 10, 2015, 10:46AM
You just set a world record for changing your mind:

Ronkny:
How's that?  It's non denominational. Nothing about God or Allah or Jesus.
63  Practice Break / Purely Politics / Re: Religion Matters on: Apr 10, 2015, 10:36AM

Because, as everyone knows, everyone in the South knows what l'chaim means ... uh huh.
 
If you ask 100 non-Jewish people what l'chaim means, I'd guess your correct responses would be under 5%, and I'm probably being generous.
 
No matter in any case. You're assuming that matters to the motive and the "gag" ... turns out it doesn't--not in the slightest.
So what's the point of saying it?
64  Practice Break / Purely Politics / Re: Religion Matters on: Apr 10, 2015, 10:36AM
I'm not sure how you could be sensitive to the overreaction of the atheist but not to that of the people objecting. It's not a big deal that the personnel were asked not to say it. It's perfectly usual that our appearance, demeanor, and behavior are restricted in a workplace in a way that they are not during off hours, and the people who objected to the restriction are behaving foolishly.

You obviously aren't offended by greetings given in an official capacity that reflect a religion different from your own, and I commend you for that. But not everyone feels that way. I wonder what the reaction would be if one of the personnel at the same gate started using "Praise Allah", now that we've loosed the floodgates. I'm sure it would be just fine with everyone.
Except that "praise Allah" is one particular religion. Have a blessed day is religion neutral.  This is America.  Freedom of Religion not freedom from religion.  Protest something that has meaning and might make a difference.  
65  Practice Break / Purely Politics / Re: Religion Matters on: Apr 10, 2015, 10:33AM
The government answer machine greeting I called today said (and I quote) "Have a Blessed Day." Would you like the telephone number?



No.  It's not offensive.  It's not meant to be offensive.  You're money says, "In God we trust".  It's not meant to single anyone out. It's someone's way of being polite. Where's the issue.
66  Practice Break / Purely Politics / Re: Religion Matters on: Apr 10, 2015, 10:27AM

I'll second that.
 
I have to admit I do like to respond l'chaim sometimes though, just to see what the response is ... can be telling, but much more often just amusing. Sometimes it's only amusing due to the fact that some may think I'm Jewish as a result, which is obviously understandable, but as an insider regarding my disposition of religion, that amuses me. It's nothing on them at all though. I'm very easily amused, and l'chaim is a term I enjoy using in all sorts of inappropriate settings--not just Christmastime (interesting ... Christmastime is actually in this computer's spellcheck dictionary ... and spellcheck was not).
 
A lot of the "controversy" is just the buzz of histrionic indignation over the idea--people getting worked up over their own imaginings about such an event. There doesn't even have to be an actual offense for a lot of people to go absolutely ballistic about the notion of it. Most of the War On Christmas is actually the buzz about the idea, and very little actual "Warfare" usually actually happens by comparison (i.e. there's far more weeping and wailing and gnashing of teeth than there is anything resembling a reason for the weeping and wailing and gnashing of teeth). The industry around the idea is huge, whereas the actual subject of all that business is a proverbial mole hill ... just like the Satanic Panic and backward masking "controversies" of the '80s, and just like the Great Testimony Challenge that goes on all the time, particularly in conservative Protestant churches.
Except that jews don't use "l'chaim" in anyway that you describe so everyone will look at you funny.  Might as well say, "telephone" or "waterbottle" or "landshark".
67  Practice Break / Purely Politics / Re: Religion Matters on: Apr 10, 2015, 10:25AM
Religion is not a legitimate reason to justify anything - good or bad.

Slavery is wrong, because it is wrong. Religious objection doesn't make it more or less wrong. Those particular abolitionists were right for the wrong reason.

Mendel was brilliant (and sadly, his work remained undiscovered for many years) in spite of his day job.

How many people have been maimed or killed in the name of religion? Just today?

How many people have had their pockets picked by religious hucksters (e.g. the Catholic Church; evangelist TV preachers etc)? Just today?

How many people died in a Brooklyn house fire a few weeks ago because religious observances include practices that are blatantly stupid? Seven. And no, the parents won't be held accountable.

How many people are subjected to bizarre, mutilating and damaging 'healthcare' practices (e.g., circumcision) due to religion? Countless.

How many Americans cast their votes based on the religious convictions of the candidates under consideration. Who knows... One is too many.



So throw the baby out with the bathwater.  Brilliant!
68  Practice Break / Purely Politics / Re: Religion Matters on: Apr 10, 2015, 10:23AM
"Bless you" is uttered by religious/non-religious people as if was a reflex action (of course it isn't). In some (perhaps many) cases, the religious message isn't  even implied by the phrase. I know this from family members and friends who use the phrase, but do not believe in gods or that religion serves a useful purpose. I've known quite a few people who began to use the phrase as kids because they were self-conscious about not saying it - essentially they felt pressure to conform despite not having religious beliefs. Even as a young child, I found this to be quite sad.

"Have a blessed day" is an explicit religious message, can be offensive and shouldn't be used without knowing the beliefs (or lack thereof) of the intended recipient. There is no reason to use this phrase in the workplace.

I left a business-related telephone message about an hour ago and "Have a blessed day" was the final phrase of the greeting. This was in a city government office.

How would people respond if a government-owned answering machine included the phrase, "Praise Allah?" You know damn well that people would hit the roof.

Same thing...



Except that the gov't own answering machine says nothing of the sort and should never either whether Christian or Muslim, or Jewish or whatever.
I have a friend that says God bless. Whenever we say goodbye.  Is it meant to be offensive?  No.  Why would an atheist take offense? What harm is he doing?
69  Practice Break / Purely Politics / Re: Religion Matters on: Apr 10, 2015, 09:49AM
It's ironic when believers fail to understand these "greeting offenses" given the recent history of "CHRIST-Mass Warfare", in which the American Family Association has been probably the primary antagonist, and much ado has been made of the "failure" to use the term Christmas or to exclude any references to non-Christian aspects of the holiday, not excluding its history.
Because it's being done to appease atheists because of atheist insecurities and thin skin.  It someone wishes me Happy Ramadan, or Good Shabbos I won't be offended because none is intended.  Political correctness gone nuts.
70  Practice Break / Purely Politics / Re: Religion Matters on: Apr 10, 2015, 09:42AM

It's possible you could be more unclear, but not by much--not using actual words anyway.
 
You have to realize that others aren't inside your head thinking of the same referent all the time. You can't leave the subject of your words unspoken unless it's a well established context. Here you may be referring to the quote, the idea that it may be more apropos here, or the previous context of the discussion into which I injected the quote.
 
Such unspoken premises make discussion very difficult--tends to veer it off course in lagomorphic pursuits.
I've explained myself, you who admits he doesn't read every post. No offense meant.  None should be taken.  The atheists offende3d are looking for a reason to be offended.  Like road rage nutjobs.
71  Practice Break / Purely Politics / Re: Religion Matters on: Apr 10, 2015, 09:33AM
Sometimes it seems as if part of my sig on the Project Reason Forum would be much more apropos here:
 
Few people are capable of expressing with equanimity opinions which differ from the prejudices of their social environment.  Most people are even incapable of forming such opinions. —Albert Einstein
No.  It's common sense.
72  Practice Break / Purely Politics / Re: Religion Matters on: Apr 10, 2015, 09:29AM
Well, no, the question is if you know it will offend, is there ever a time when you would be considerate?

I guess I have the answer.


If it doesn't offend why be offended? No I don't know it will offend.  It doesn't make sense.  It's silly.
And your question is too broad.  So you don't have an answer, Tim.
73  Practice Break / Purely Politics / Re: Religion Matters on: Apr 10, 2015, 08:53AM
Knowing that some things, words and actions are offensive to others, would a Christian EVER refrain from doing it?

Just to be considerate? 

Even though not required to, would a Christian ever want to hold a higher standard? 
The question is, "Why is it offensive".  I think those that think it's offensive have mental issues.  Or anger issues.  Like extreme feminists that get upset when a man holds a door open for them.  It's just silly.
74  Practice Break / Purely Politics / Re: Religion Matters on: Apr 10, 2015, 08:34AM
Anyone who takes another wishing them well as offensive is just being an egotistical d*ck. Seriously. And they are quickly written off as such by most any they complain to for it.

Wishing someone well, or fortune, or blessings is a nice and friendly gesture and 99.9% of people welcome and approve of. Personally, I'm not going to damped my day or change my behavior for the .1% that gets their panties in a wad for not having the world conform to their wills.
I agree.  However, atheists are jealous so I do feel sorry for them.  So they react with anger and "I'm smarter than you.  I don't believe in fairies".  I find many of them cold hearted.
And Tim is just angry.  Getting upset when someone says, "Have a blessed day".  Is just silly.
75  Practice Break / Purely Politics / Re: Religion Matters on: Apr 10, 2015, 08:32AM
Germans say "Gesundheit" when you sneeze, I translate as "strong health."  

The OT equates breath to life (which is why even late term abortion is no problem biblically, nobody is alive until they've drawn breath).

When you've sneezed and your breath has left your body, so has your spirit, and a demon can enter and posess you.  So your friends quick say "bless you" to protect you from this.

A Christian would of course see that as a pagan ritual and avoid it.  
No.  I don't see it as a pagan ritual.  
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/God_bless_you
76  Practice Break / Purely Politics / Re: Religion Matters on: Apr 10, 2015, 08:00AM
Certainly no more elitist than providing the blessing in the first place. Why is that even necessary? Furthemore, why is it even acceptable?

Why not, "Sorry that you don't feel well."; "Hope you feel better soon."; "Can I get you something?"; "Cold or allergies?."


you don't realize that these sayings that offend you so much are ingrained in our culture... Like baseball, apple pie and chevrolet. It's not elitist. People are so thinned skinned these days.
It is elitist to think your smarter than everyone else that believes in "fairies".. But thats just not the case.
77  Practice Break / Purely Politics / Re: Religion Matters on: Apr 10, 2015, 07:42AM
Please elaborate.

to be religious is a choice. I can chose not to go to church. The Church does not control me. I have free will.
78  Practice Break / Purely Politics / Re: Religion Matters on: Apr 10, 2015, 07:38AM
I say, "No, thank you."

Just to be beligerent, snarky, better than that person.. Elitist.
79  Practice Break / Purely Politics / Re: Religion Matters on: Apr 10, 2015, 07:37AM
'Atheist' is your term.

I have:
Food
Shelter
A caring family
A good education
A good career
Fun hobbies
A desire/means to contribute to the greater good of my community

What am I missing? Oh right... stupodity.


Ignorance is obviously, bliss.
80  Practice Break / Purely Politics / Re: Religion Matters on: Apr 10, 2015, 07:29AM
A religion-neutral greeting would be appropriate for strangers. If the two parties then become better-acquainted and learn that they share common beliefs, then a private religion-based greeting might be appropriate.

I simply state politely, 'Freedom from religion is as important as freedom of religion.' and leave it at that.

I'm not a 'practicing' atheist and readily acknowledge that 'organized' atheism is a complete waste of time - akin to organized religion. Furthermore, 'atheist' is your label. I don't require a label and don't care if 'atheists' get a bad name.

I do my best to ignore/avoid the nonsensical farce that is religion. If you need it, fine. I shouldn't have to hear about it in the workplace.



If you sneeze and I say, "Bless you".. You're really going to be offended? Seriously?
There is no right to "freedom from religion"... It's NOT in the Constitution.
Man up.
Pages: 1 2 3 [4] 5 6 7 8 9 ... 496