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1083761 Posts in 71745 Topics- by 19136 Members - Latest Member: Weirdness28
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1  Horns, Gear, and Equipment / Instruments / Re: Trying to ID a Yamaha on ebay on: Yesterday at 07:29 PM
446 is also an 8.5 bell. Only the 356/456/455/353 ( the 500/525 sized horns) have 8 bells.

Interesting. It makes sense to do it that way... Kind of. So if you can figure out the bell diametertoo then you could also make a pretty good guess.
2  Horns, Gear, and Equipment / Instruments / Re: Trying to ID a Yamaha on ebay on: Yesterday at 05:58 PM
Could also be a 356G.  The model should be on the side of the slide receiver but theyu didn't take a picture at the right angle that would let you zoom in on it.  May also be able to tell by the bell engraving which they also left out.  Granted, any of those horns play well, the 356G, 446, 448, and of course the 600 series.  But they're all slightly different and have different "values".  ALthough that said, if it is the student horn it is one of the cheapest ways, if not the cheapest way, to try a dual bore 500/525. I'm not aware of any other horn in production that comes up for sale used almost every with that bore size.

356 is 500/525
446 is 525
448 is 547
630 is 525
646 is 525

the 356 and I think 446 have 8" bells but the others have 8.5" bells fwiw. 
3  Horns, Gear, and Equipment / Instruments / Re: Trying to ID a Yamaha on ebay on: Yesterday at 10:06 AM
Unless you can ascertain the bore size I don't think you'll be able to tell from the pictures. The 44x and 630,64x series all look very similar.
4  Horns, Gear, and Equipment / Repairs, Modifications and Maintenance / Re: Conn 88H Leadpipe Issue on: Yesterday at 08:56 AM
Can you see a ring about 8" below the receiver if you take the outer slide off and hold it up to the light?
5  Horns, Gear, and Equipment / Repairs, Modifications and Maintenance / Re: Bach Strad silver tube material? on: Oct 19, 2017, 11:21AM
I think with Rath you can get an all nickel horn?  At least close, I know of someone with a nickel bell and tuning slide and obviously they do crooks and slides out of it.  Not sure about the neckpipe though.
6  Teaching & Learning / Beginners and Returning Trombonists / Re: Tuning Problem on my valve trombone on: Oct 18, 2017, 01:47PM
It was probably buffed off not lacquered over it the lacquer truly is that thick, it is probably dead as a doornail playing wise.
7  Horns, Gear, and Equipment / Repairs, Modifications and Maintenance / Re: Adding Shires threaded leadpipe receiver to Conn slide on: Oct 18, 2017, 10:26AM
.

This was a really good comment that added some clarity to what I had written about going about it the proper way. I know it specifically called into question what I had written a few posts prior but I defer to and welcome your expertise since you have quite a bit of it! I'm going to edit mine to reflect your indication. Mine should have been worded better in the first place.
8  Horns, Gear, and Equipment / Repairs, Modifications and Maintenance / Re: Bach Strad silver tube material? on: Oct 18, 2017, 10:20AM
Bracing and ferrules etc. That appear silver in color are usually nickel on a trombone.
9  Horns, Gear, and Equipment / Accessories / Re: Best Gig Case For a Rath? on: Oct 18, 2017, 09:00AM
Eh, I mean my favorite cases (Eastman) don't really fit Shires or Edwards horns as far as I'm aware.  Case manufacturers make their money on their bread & butter... stock factory horns. Small cases need to fit YSL354, King 606 and maybe some of the pro horns... Bach 16 and King 2B/3B.  That's probably 75%+ of the market.

The Eastman have to fit Bach 42 and Conn 88.  Probably not so much Yamaha even because they come stock with great cases (which can explain why the Sullivan Xeno has such a difficult time with like, every 3rd party case).

Likewise, when you get to the botique level, you're really making something that is at least nominally 100% optimized for sound.  ("Quality without Compromise"!)  That may mean compromising what cases will fit.  Would it be ideal as consumers for that not to be the case? Maybe. But then someone would be needing to do everything well.  I think there are enough options out there that we can figure it out. Its a heck of a lot better than it was 50 years ago!

10  Horns, Gear, and Equipment / Accessories / Re: Best Gig Case For a Rath? on: Oct 18, 2017, 07:10AM
There is a disc that you can put in the case that is around the same diamter as the interior of the case. It has foam and cloth but it appears to be made of something rigid but I don't know what. I wouldn't run over the bell with it but it should help the bell if you accidentally butt up against something. Your bell bead wouldn't get hit, it woudl be the disc.

I don't know if comparable cases in the Reunion blues lineup have them but every Cronkhite case I've had has had one of those.

The slide comparment is a big piece of foam. The double cases have a rigid piece of material going down the center but otherwise the slides are surrounded by foam and held in place by two velcro straps.  To be perfectly honest, I'd trust the huge piece of foam over something rigid since it keeps it very immobile. It almost floats.
11  Horns, Gear, and Equipment / Instruments / Re: Looking for recommendations on a Symphonic horn on: Oct 18, 2017, 05:29AM
Symphonic Horn? An Elkhart 8D, of course!

 :D

Devil's advocate here;

Personally, the Benge 165 is a pretty sub-standard instrument compared to any of the horns available now, like cheap Bach 42s and Conn 88Hs. I haven't played one that really resonated.

I don't disagree but I've also been surprised by a few horns of that ilk recently (e.g. factory horns that are not 42 and 88).  I played a 4B not too long ago and was perturbed at how well it played Amazed  I've played some 4Bs that I viscerally did not like, but that was NOT one of them!
12  Horns, Gear, and Equipment / Mouthpieces / Re: Odd mpc experience on: Oct 18, 2017, 04:52AM
May have been altered at some point.  People love opening up the backbore thinking it'll make the piece more 'open'. It does not always turn out that way !
13  Teaching & Learning / Beginners and Returning Trombonists / Re: Tuning Problem on my valve trombone on: Oct 17, 2017, 06:08PM
You aren't alone.  When you start to get into the higher overtones, you may need to use alternative fingerings to get notes in tune.  On euphonium, the horn I used to play needed to play  with 1+2 to get it in tune a lot of the time.  Some valved players get a little kick lever that is operated with your pinky. It moves the main tuning slide so you can adjust the instrument as a whoel depending on the context of the chord and the note you're playing.

This is also why trumpet players have 1st and 3rd slides that are moveable by your left hand. I don't know if I've seen them on a valve trombone but I'd imagine its because it woudl be harder to make it work because of the size.
14  Horns, Gear, and Equipment / Instruments / Re: Looking for recommendations on a Symphonic horn on: Oct 17, 2017, 04:55PM
Hi, Forum members. I'm a freshman studying Music Education at the University of Memphis and my trombone professor has told me that he highly recommends I look into getting another symphonic horn to replace what I am using now, a Benge 165F, as I've been selected to play with the Wind Ensemble (top wind band alongside the Orchestra) next semester, and he thinks my horn won't be able to accomplish what's demanded there. He's mentioned all of the staples, the Bach 42, Conn 88, Xeno, and XO. But I'm wondering what other options there are. I will say that I think I'll want to avoid another Benge, as I don't very much like the blow of the one I have. So what is there?
Thanks!

What about the Benge is he thinking will cause you do not be able to accomplish what is being demanded?  Is it in disrepair? Or is it not a good fit for you and its been demonstrated that other horns have advantages over your current horn? (Eg if you need to replace the rotor because it is corroded past the point of repair then it has an obvious technical shortcoming).  Or is it a matter of preference/precedent? I started college on a Xeno that I didn't like, although I thought it played fine in high school.  I eventually switched to a 42.  I occasionally play the same model to see if it was me.  It was, sort of, but it also wasn't a good fit for me even to this day. So if its one, the other, or a little bit of both you aren't the first person who has had any of those issues but it helps in making recommendations because they can be tailored to your actual needs instead of essentially being our own preferences.  Because you'll basically get someone who likes basically every one out there. Not hyperbole. From the cheapest Chinese horn through the botiques and the German imports, I've heard someone say positive things about all of them. 

The botique horns (Edwards, Shires, Rath, M&W, etc.) have the advantage that if you go to the factory to get setup, you'll come out with a horn you like. They have tons of options and a dedicated person who fits people so you can bet you'll come out with something that'll work for you.  They cost some bread though. $4400-$5300ish w/o a case.

There are still plenty of players on the mass-market models: The 42s, the 88s, etc.  Some are better than others.  Yamaha makes pretty consistent horns. ANd they're usually a good price. If one of them worsk the best for you, you'll save yourself some money. THe price point on a Yamaha is relatively low compared to the quality that they offer. But they are limited options - as with the Bachs and Conns, etc.

There are imports from China that are on another tier compared to some of the studenty horns that have been prevalent for the last few years. Shires Q series are parts made in Massachusetts and assembled in China, then prepped and checked by the Boston plant.  Very good option. Fully modular with the Shires stuff but you save a lot of money on them.  Rath has a similar horn in the R400 though it is made in China to the best of my knowledge. However, Rath takes care of the QC.

And, of course, any of these can be acquired used if you have the patience.  There are some good offerings at Brassark and DIllons. I can't believe some of the horns that Noah at Brassark has been selling recently.  Really fantastic stuff.  Noah is good at finding horns if you are in the market and guiding you through choosing something that'll work . ANd his prices are really good for the used market. 
15  Horns, Gear, and Equipment / Accessories / Re: Best Gig Case For a Rath? on: Oct 17, 2017, 04:33PM
Thanks for the suggestions.  I've had the SKB case for at least a decade.  It housed my 2B all those years.  Now that I purchased a Rath (with a few trade ins) I found it odd about the wing nut. (or whatever the English to 'Merican translation for it is)

Has anyone used the cordura cronkhite gig bags?  Do those have bell support?

I'm looking at getting one of those.


Thanks.

Cronkhite are the only gig bags I'd consider for a botique. (Though I primarily use hard cases because I'm clumsy).  I have one for alto, although I don't own an alto anymore and a double for a bass + tenor. I'd avoid the "G" style cases (Where the slide compartment is stiched to the side). He stopped selling them because they were being sent in for warranty work a lot.  The "O" style bag, which has the slide in a small foam case inside the bag itself is fantastic though.  The flight case, where the slide compartment is on the outside, but attached with some kind of cloth straps is sturdier than the "G" style bag and can be separated for an easier time stowing away in an airplane overhead. (Or other similar tihgt fit.  The "flight" case is convenient because it does mean you can put the two parts away separately.
16  Horns, Gear, and Equipment / Accessories / Re: Best Gig Case For a Rath? on: Oct 16, 2017, 12:34PM
I'm pretty sure he had the skb and got a rath. He's just saying the raths wingnut is the reason it won't fit. Not that Michael Rath is a bad designer for not making a horn that can fit in a particular case
17  Horns, Gear, and Equipment / Mouthpieces / Re: Tricks for locating Wedge mouthpieces correctly? on: Oct 16, 2017, 08:23AM
I was referring to a regular DE piece.  I'm wondering though if the teflon might affect the playing characteristics somehow.  I've found by slipping an o-ring on to where the cup meets the shank seems to improve the slotting. 

With a normal piece the change in angle doesn't matter. It's very, very slight. But on a wedge it makes a big difference because of how different the shape and width of the rim is.

I haven't noticed any difference in Teflon (it's very thin) and I've been using it on and off for almost a decade now. If you haven't noticed it, you probably don't need it. If you put the rim on your face when playing and tilt your head sideways most of my Elliott pieces will shift with my head a little. Again, not a huge deal. I used the Teflon prior to trying the wedge for the opposite reason: to keep the pieces from being stuck together.

Basically, Teflon keeps threads movable but also let's them move slightly less freely. Really what you'd want on any set of threads for an instrument. Ymmv though
18  Horns, Gear, and Equipment / Mouthpieces / Re: Tricks for locating Wedge mouthpieces correctly? on: Oct 16, 2017, 07:37AM
Huh...never had that problem.


It wouldn't be a problem on a normal wedge. Or if the parts are stuck together. But between the screw I'm leadpipe,shank, cup, and rim theres bound to be something that moved!
19  Horns, Gear, and Equipment / Mouthpieces / Re: Tricks for locating Wedge mouthpieces correctly? on: Oct 16, 2017, 06:49AM
Is there a particular reason you do this relating perhaps to playing characteristics?

The threads areprine to moving while you play. Especially the shank. Normally it's not a problem at all but when placement is important it can be distracting to find the rim has moved when you remove it from your face (rests etc).
20  Horns, Gear, and Equipment / Accessories / Re: Concerns regarding various grip aids on: Oct 16, 2017, 05:40AM
Neotech should be very simple to remove. But it's harder if you didn't tighten the screws enough as it would expand to he larger than is ideal. You also may ha e used too many shivs in the install. It only needs one on the cork barrel and the narrowest one is likely fine.
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