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988164 Posts in 65585 Topics- by 16145 Members - Latest Member: Love2Lindy
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1  Creation and Performance / The Healthy Trombonist / Re: What is with my throat? on: Jun 27, 2015, 03:38AM
It's more likely that you are using too much abdominal support. Tighten your stomach muscles and what happens to your throat? It tightens up.
I think everyone has experienced this to some extent at some time in their career, usually early on, and is one of the main issues to solve to become a good player.
2  Teaching & Learning / Beginners and Returning Trombonists / Re: How to Tune Your Trombone on: Jun 22, 2015, 07:14AM
First position two inches (5 cm) out from the bumpers seems pretty drastic. That's about a quarter tone.

I play my 3rd position right on the bell or slightly in front, depending on the note, chord, tonality, whatever. My 1st position is maybe 1/4 inch out and I tune my horn with the tuning slide pulled 3/8 inch (1 cm) out. So even if I pushed all the way in, I would be out only about an inch. But then I would lose 7th position, which I do actually use, not to mention low valve C.
I use mutes a lot and am used to compensating down for them. With a Wawa (harmon) or plunger I don't have the valve and really need that 7th.
To each his own, I guess.

Before switching to Shires and now Rath, I played an uncut Bach 42 in Germany and was often right on the border of being flat with the tuning slide all the way in.

3  Creation and Performance / The Healthy Trombonist / Re: Kleinhammer and Yoga breathing on: Jun 22, 2015, 06:33AM
Sven, I read The Inner Game of Tennis years ago.
I haven't read Zen in the Art of Archery yet, have been meaning to.
4  Creation and Performance / The Healthy Trombonist / Re: Kleinhammer and Yoga breathing on: Jun 22, 2015, 03:12AM
Now that I think about it some more, I seem to remember reading that same interview and thinking "oh, oh, they're talking about the wrong book" when the author referenced Autobiography of a Yogi.  Then again, EK may have read it...it was really making the rounds at the time.....but I know for a fact he never mentioned it to me.

So maybe I did remember correctly.That's comforting.
I've been wondering about this for years and it's amazing what a little question in the forum can clear up.


Thank you, I'm looking forward to reading it.

5  Creation and Performance / The Healthy Trombonist / Re: Kleinhammer and Yoga breathing on: Jun 21, 2015, 04:09PM
Thank you for that information, Dennis.
I'm sure your are right, I must have mixed up the books, which doesn't surprise me, it was a long time ago I that I read the Kleinhammer interview.
I'll try and find Science of Breath but I'm quite glad that, through my mistake, I read Autobiography of a Yogi, which I probably never would have done.



6  Creation and Performance / The Healthy Trombonist / Kleinhammer and Yoga breathing on: Jun 21, 2015, 01:09PM
I have it my mind that I read somewhere (ITA Journal, Instrumentalist, etc) that Ed Kleinhammer recommended the book "Autobiography of a Yogi" by Paramahansa Yogananda, especially for it's description of Yogi breathing.
Because of this, I purchased this book years ago and have since read it. An amazing book by any means and as a practicing Yogi myself, I was very inspired by it in many respects.

The thing is, there really isn't much about Yogi breathing in the book, at least no real description.
I was wondering, why would Kleinhammer have recommend it? 

For those of you who knew him, did he in fact recommend this book and if so, what were his reasons? Was he into Kriya Yoga or other forms of Yoga? Was he fascinated, like I am, with the many comparisons of Hinduism and Christianity? There is so much love an compassion in the book, you really can't read it and not become a better person in some way or other. From what I hear about Kleinhammer, he was a very superb human being. Does anybody know if this book was an influence or inspiration for him or anything more about this?

Thank you.
7  Classified Advertisements / Classified Advertisements / Re: FS: Rath R3 8.5 inch Bell Flare - Practically New on: Jun 21, 2015, 11:33AM
Just did some research!  Turns out that this flare will fit an R3 as well as an R4 Good!

That's right, everything is interchangeable in an R3 and R4. So, the only difference between the two are the slides (and lead pipes) and the bell.
8  Horns, Gear, and Equipment / Mouthpieces / Re: Differences between Greg Black mouthpieces? on: Jun 21, 2015, 11:25AM
Thanks for the replies, guys.

Just to be clear: the NY series rim is rounder than the standard series rim (I'm guessing the standard is flatter than the NY), and the standard series throat is a little more open at the backbore near the throat than the NY series. Is that right?

I'm assuming the standard's more open backbore at the throat allows the warmer sound that is not as easy in the upper register.

Perhaps the NY 5.25 (cup depth between the 5.5 and the 5) in a lighter weight might be good compromise for me...

Yes, that is correct. The difference in the rim contours is very slight. Cup depth is, as far as I could judge, the same, so I also feel that the more open back bore in the 4G-5G is responsible for the big difference in sound and response.
Greg says, that he often makes the 4G-5G with the #1 back bore, not often enough judging by the wait!
9  Classified Advertisements / Classified Advertisements / Re: FS: Rath R3 8.5 inch Bell Flare - Practically New on: Jun 21, 2015, 08:46AM
Wouldn't this be an R4 bell?
10  Horns, Gear, and Equipment / Mouthpieces / Re: Differences between Greg Black mouthpieces? on: Jun 21, 2015, 05:04AM
The rims are a little different, NY is a bit rounder. I like both.

The main difference is in the back bores. The NY series uses a #1 back bore and the standard series uses a #3, which is, in Greg's words "like a coke bottle", meaning more open near the throat.

I have a 4G-5G (regular weight) and had a NY 5.5M (which I sold because I felt a little cramped in with the smaller rim size). The 4G-5G has a warmer sound, great in the low register but not as easy in the high register as the NY 5.5. The NY5.5 is a great mouthpiece, really easy to play in all registers with a full, clear sound. I wish he made one with a 26.1 mm rim size like the 4 series.

For this reason, I have ordered a 4G-5G with a #1 backbone, which I have been waiting for almost 1 1/2 years now.

11  Creation and Performance / Musical Miscellany / Re: Visiting rath on: Jun 11, 2015, 02:17PM
I think Chris left in December 2014, that's when Mick told me. I don't know why he left.
12  Creation and Performance / Musical Miscellany / Re: Visiting rath on: Jun 10, 2015, 02:19PM
Chris no longer works for Rath Trombones, so contact Mick
I've always had a great time visiting the Rath factory.
13  Classified Advertisements / Classified Advertisements / Re: WTB or WTT for a two piece Glenn Cronkhite bag for large tenor on: Jun 03, 2015, 11:58AM
I have one of these, great bag. I've never flown with it, though. I usually put it in an SKB Golf case and give it to our transport guys because I would rather not fly with a trombone if I don't have to.
Jamie Williams has told me he has flown with one many times. It is very sleek and would have no problem fitting in an overseas flight overhead baggage compartment.
The bag is actually designed to fit an 8.5 inch bell and an 8 inch but it will fit two 8.5 bells.
14  Horns, Gear, and Equipment / Accessories / Re: Modifying a ProTec Case on: Jun 03, 2015, 11:28AM
So it seems like they are listening to us and changing things for the better, good.
For the record, i hardly ever use this case. My Shires, which I never play, sits in it. I should probably sell them both.
15  Horns, Gear, and Equipment / Accessories / Re: Modifying a ProTec Case on: May 21, 2015, 02:12PM
I've tried posting a picture, without success. If you pm me your email, I will send it to you.
Bruce
16  Horns, Gear, and Equipment / Accessories / Re: Modifying a ProTec Case on: May 19, 2015, 02:39PM
I took out the mouthpiece holder in my tenor case. It does kind of ruin the fabric and you have glue residue left over but you could glue fabric over this to make it nicer. I wonder why they put those stupid mouthpiece holders in there instead of just living the space free. That would be much better, I'm my opinion.
If you want I could take a photo of mine.

17  Horns, Gear, and Equipment / Accessories / Re: Solotone mute suggestions on: May 04, 2015, 09:55AM
Are you saying you increased the thickness of the cork?

yes, I've almost doubled the cork thickness.
18  Horns, Gear, and Equipment / Accessories / Re: Solotone mute suggestions on: May 04, 2015, 04:31AM
I have put an extra ring of cork around my H&B Solotone and it is fairly well in tune now. I play an 8 1/2 inch bell.
19  Practice Break / Chit-Chat / Re: Yoga for a Beginner on: Apr 27, 2015, 03:33PM
I learned Hatha Yoga by myself from a book about 25 years ago.
I'd been doing it off and on since then but started doing it every day for for the last 2 years.
I've never felt better, lost 10 pounds and am totally addicted. I used to run, still do a bit but I never really lost weight running.

Lessons are better because you can do many things wrong and really hurt yourself. I sure did!
But it's like learning an instrument. You can have one or two lessons a week but if you don't practice, you won't get very far.
That's why it's called practicing Yoga.

I had my first lesson this last year. My teacher corrected a few minor mistakes but pretty much said everything else was great and to keep practicing, so it can be done.
It's a long process but the benefits are there at every stage. The key is the breathing and not to push things, it's not a sport.
I'll say it again for emphasis, YOU REALLY CAN HURT YOURSELF IF YOU DO IT WRONG.

Namaste
20  Creation and Performance / Music, Concerts and Recordings / Re: Your Favorite "Warm-up" Piece of Real Music on: Apr 17, 2015, 02:43PM
Bolero! No kidding.

When I studied with Henry C. Smith, he recommended putting it in my warm up.
After I laughed, he said, why not, you play things just as difficult in your warm up.
To drive the point home he picked my trombone, which was actually his (he had lent it to me to play on because I was visiting him at Tanglewood without a horn) and he played a perfect Bolero. No warm up and he hadn't played a note for weeks.

He was right, that really helped my Bolero back then and it became one of my best audition pieces.

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