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1069773 Posts in 70993 Topics- by 18771 Members - Latest Member: schaarea
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1  Horns, Gear, and Equipment / Instruments / Re: Brad Close sackbuts on: Yesterday at 04:38 AM
Yes, sackbut is held differently than modern trombone. There are various grip solutions. If you look at pictures or videos of players you can see the different ways they are held. Also, the bass can easily have a thumb rest attached at the bell receiver area to allow for a modern type grip.

Thanks, Brad.  I'll google around. :)

Good luck with these!

--Andy in OKC
2  Horns, Gear, and Equipment / Instruments / Re: Brad Close sackbuts on: Jun 25, 2017, 05:29AM
Very cool.  Good!

Is the left hand usage substantially different on this horn?  If so, is that common for sackbut?  I don't think I could hold this horn with a traditional left-hand grip.  (I hope this doesn't sound like griping or trolling -- I really am just interested in the intention and mechanics of the grip.   Confused)

--Andy in OKC
3  Creation and Performance / Performance / Re: Watching and listening on: Jun 22, 2017, 07:38PM
Okay, this made me chuckle...

--Andy in OKC

Why's that?

As Blast said, because it's so often the truth...  :D :cry:

-Andy in OKC
4  Creation and Performance / Performance / Re: Watching and listening on: Jun 22, 2017, 04:42AM

snip...
But.... even in top level pro ensembles you hear people complain about things EXACTLY like what you are describing. Being able to deal with it professionally is part of being a professional. It sucks but if you play in an ensemble that you think DOESN'T have those issues, chances are you are the one who is obliviously causing issues for those around you.
snip...


Okay, this made me chuckle...

--Andy in OKC
5  Creation and Performance / Trombonists / Re: Charles Vernon!! on: Jun 16, 2017, 05:17AM

Beautiful! Just wow! Good! Good! Good!

--Andy in OKC
6  Horns, Gear, and Equipment / Repairs, Modifications and Maintenance / Re: Where to get fine grinding paste ?? on: Jun 10, 2017, 07:19PM
The OP amended his original post to state that he was looking to lap the valve tuning slide, not the valve itself. If a valve ever worked and stopped working, lapping is probably not the answer. You'd end up removing metal in far more areas than the spot in the casing that's distorted.

Thanks, I missed that.   :)

--Andy in OKC
7  Horns, Gear, and Equipment / Repairs, Modifications and Maintenance / Re: Where to get fine grinding paste ?? on: Jun 10, 2017, 05:10AM
So, back to the original poster's (Marc's) issue...

It's possible that the casing is distorted in some fashion and that should be checked first.  If one laps valves, it's quite possible (almost certain) that it will negatively affect the valve compression unless everything is mechanically perfect first.

And then summing up what I understand about checking pressure...

Simso's (Steve's) process uses a compressor and a jig.  The compressor provides air which is metered at a rate of between 1 and 3 pounds of pressure.  The horn is stoppered and the air line is attached to the horn.  Leakage is measured by having a flow meter gauge inserted inline between the air compressor and the horn itself.

This has been enlightening for me!  Good!  I hope I got this right.  And I hope Marc resolves his issue. :)

--Andy in OKC
8  Teaching & Learning / Practice Room / Re: Forget quality, listen to the volume! on: Jun 10, 2017, 04:49AM

Ummmmm..... you HAVE to sound bad at various points in the practice room..... the first time you tried playing a trombone did you immediately stop because it didn't sound like Alessi? When you first began practice high register did you only ever play up to notes that you thought sounded "good"? How about when you first practiced double tongueing? Did you give up because it was a mess? Of course not. (I assume!  :D )
I believe if you only ever sound good in the practice room you are doing it wrong. You have to experiment, push the boundries, figure out how to make bad sounds turn into good sounds. The way to improve on a bad sound is not by ignoring it. I think Burgerbob is totally correct, push the limits of your volume in the practice room. Work at making the top levels sound nice.

I completely agree.  I tell my students that in the practice room you must be working on things that do not sound good so you can improve them.  1/2 of practice time should be devoted to working on growth and the other 1/2 to fine tuning.  With beginners, I always warn them that they will sound awful -- and that's okay.  And it's going to take practice and effort to go from awful to bad, and then from bad to mediocre, etc.  So, just understand that and work on improving every time you play the horn.

--Andy in OKC
9  Horns, Gear, and Equipment / Repairs, Modifications and Maintenance / Re: Where to get fine grinding paste ?? on: Jun 09, 2017, 04:33PM
Close, the bell is sealed off with a plug, the second gauge in the picture is connected downstream of the restrictor, it reads directly what exists within the trumpet, also note flow is always happening, you cannot just pressure the instrument, we need flow, the trick is identifying the amount of flow that exists in a good trumpet around good pistons, once we have worked out how much flow is always needed we can then apply added pressure to simulate playing within the instrument, if a leak occurs anywhere in the system greater than the flow that exists around a piston on a good instrument, be it a valve leaking or bad spit valve cork it will register a drop in the gauge as flow is greater and a pressure drop is registered on the gauge.

Example, puff your cheeks out with air, block your lips with your thumb, tilt your thumb so air slightly leaks, we now have flow with a small amount of pressure, try and maintain that same pressure and flow, now kick your fthumb to create a larger leak, the flow will increase and the pressure within your mouth drops further..


Steve

Thank you, Steve.  This makes sense!

--Andy in OKC
10  Teaching & Learning / Practice Room / Re: Flexibility Advice: a change in mouthpiece? on: Jun 09, 2017, 05:18AM
Every discontinuity in the pipe will throw up a reflection, changing not only the sound (the forment) but the feel of the system experienced as this vibratory reactance. 


This makes me wonder... Should a basic part of the QA process for modern trombone building include the use of a borescope to inspect the horn from the inside?

--Andy in OKC
11  Horns, Gear, and Equipment / Repairs, Modifications and Maintenance / Re: Where to get fine grinding paste ?? on: Jun 09, 2017, 05:15AM
Thanks, both Steve and Tim.

So, one takes the flow jig, and hooks it to both ends of the trumpet (or points before and after the various valves in the cluster) and then measures for pressure drop.  And, I assume one removes the various tuning slides as well?

Is this basically what's happening?

--Andy in OKC
12  Horns, Gear, and Equipment / Repairs, Modifications and Maintenance / Re: Where to get fine grinding paste ?? on: Jun 08, 2017, 04:46AM
I use hetmans grinding paste, 1200 is a nice paste and is water soluble, so you can wash it clean with warm water and detergent.

My website. Half way down you can see the paste being used to lap freshly replated pistons into a valve chamber.

Good luck with it, Water soluable is imo the most important thing to be looking for whatever compound you end up using.

http://www.mirwa.com.au/Piston_rebuilding.html

Steve

Without derailing this thread too much, can someone provide a little more description of how you pressure test the valves?  I couldn't deduce from the pictures what's going on.

--Andy in OKC
13  Creation and Performance / Music, Concerts and Recordings / Re: Powerhouse Low Brass Recordings on: Jun 07, 2017, 05:59AM
Not in the same class as these performances, but it deserves to be listed for posterity.   :D

Game of Thrones Low Brass Cover.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vTDEVUlCClk

--Andy in OKC
14  Horns, Gear, and Equipment / Repairs, Modifications and Maintenance / Re: Tales of The BoreScope ------ The Continuing Saga on: Jun 05, 2017, 06:25AM
Power could certainly be the issue.  In my case, the USB 2 hub was unpowered.  YMMV.  (Your mileage may vary. :) )

--Andy in OKC
15  Horns, Gear, and Equipment / Instruments / Re: 72h clone? on: Jun 05, 2017, 05:41AM
Quote from: wgwbassbone on May 29, 2017 '. . .I don't know how close the Yamaha YBL321 is to a Bach or a Holton . . ."

I did not say this.

... I don't know how close the Yamaha YBL321 is to a Bach or a Holton as I don't have either for comparison. Others who do might chime in.....

Nope, Bill.  You didn't.  Yeah, RIGHT.

--Andy in OKC
16  Horns, Gear, and Equipment / Repairs, Modifications and Maintenance / Re: Tales of The BoreScope ------ The Continuing Saga on: May 31, 2017, 05:20AM
Tech note for gear heads trying this.  The borescope I bought wouldn't work with USB 3.  It does fine with USB 2, or when I have it passed through a USB 2 hub into my USB 3 devices.

(Yes, I know... USB 3 is backwards compatible... Yeah, RIGHT. lol.)

Works great.  Just not in a USB 3 port.  Don't know

Passing this along for others.

--Andy in OKC
17  Creation and Performance / Music, Concerts and Recordings / Re: Looking for high school jazz ensemble tunes featuring a trombone soloist on: May 29, 2017, 04:39AM
I found another song, How High the Moon (Morgan Lewis, arr. Dave Wolpe) using a search for "medium" level jazz pieces featuring a trombone solo(s) on JW Pepper (thanks for the link). I think I'll suggest that too. Still looking for more though. I have until noon EST on Wednesday. Anybody have anything that they know is not leveled as "advanced" or "difficult?" Maybe an arrangement of something that makes it easier for a high school jazz ensemble? Thanks!

How High the Moon is actually a section feature.  It has ad lib solos of 1 chorus for 1st, 2nd, and 3rd (actually the 3rd trombone solo is a little less than a chorus).  There are nicely written out solos so you don't need to improvise if you don't want to.  Our 3rd player can't quite do it, so I play his solo on bass trombone (restructured to be a bass trombone solo).  Actually, I've had to play the 3rd trombone solo in TWO big bands.

This is a good feature tune.  Well written.  Definitely playable by a high school band, but your bone section needs to be able to "sell" the tune to the audience.

--Andy in OKC
18  Horns, Gear, and Equipment / Mouthpieces / Re: Info on King 12C Mouthpiece? on: May 27, 2017, 04:49AM
I'm pretty sure I've got a King 12C here at home.  PM me if you're looking.

--Andy in OKC
19  Creation and Performance / Music, Concerts and Recordings / Re: Looking for high school jazz ensemble tunes featuring a trombone soloist on: May 27, 2017, 04:38AM
Tall Cotton - Sammy Nestico
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QIyP_eMyuYA

http://www.ejazzlines.com/tall-cotton-arranged-by-sammy-nestico

--Andy in OKC
20  Teaching & Learning / Practice Room / Re: Feedback On My Solo? on: May 22, 2017, 04:04AM
Nice.  Geezer used the word "enthusiasm" and I like that.  You showed great attitude with your playing.  The bone is capable of showing real flash and flair and, yes, attitude.  It's part of what makes the horn so special.  My friend, Exzaclee, is the master of that.  He speaks with great authority with the horn, both in what he says and how he says it.  The latter is arguably at least as important as the former.  For me, it's often what makes a solo memorable.

Keep it up!  I enjoyed your performance and hope to hear more.

--Andy in OKC
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