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1  Creation and Performance / The Healthy Trombonist / Re: You can keep the cat on: Today at 08:28 AM
Yeah, dogs think mice are cute. 

http://www.thefield.co.uk/country-house/ratting-with-terriers-26835
2  Creation and Performance / The Healthy Trombonist / Re: You can keep the cat on: Feb 23, 2017, 02:28PM
My daughter came up to me one day and said "you wouldn't want me to have grown up without ever having a pet, would you?"

So we got this cat, a siamese/burmese cross kitten, and boy was it cross. It was like sharing a house wild a wild animal, it would just bite you from nowhere, and for no reason that we could discern. It was a beautiful animal, silver grey with clear blue eyes, but if we saw anyone bend over to pet it in the street we would always try to warn them, which most people chose to ignore...

In the end she had to go, and so we found a new home on a small farm run by some people that we would see from time to time around town. The next time our paths crossed they blanked us completely.

Her name was Blossom, the irony of that name was not lost on us.

I now have a Border Terrier, which is a compact working dog from the north east of England. She has a cheerful, "chipper" disposition and believes that her job is spread goodwill wherever she goes, but settles down like a cat at night. Because of this, I have a coterie of willing volunteers to dog sit for me.

It couldn't be better really. (Sigh...)
3  Creation and Performance / Performance / Re: Why not the small bore for "legit" or classical style playing? on: Feb 23, 2017, 02:50AM

Unfortunately, the large bore trend set in mainly because of conductors in the jet-set age expecting the same results everywhere they went, while before that (we're talking pre-WWII) conductors didn't have that luxury, so even orchestras such as the Concertgebouw were able to use the G bass regularly.


In the last 40 years there's been a convergence of sound and styles going across all musics to making everything sound uniform, and orchestras certainly haven't been excluded. If so many orchestras sound similar, it's going to be ever more difficult to justify their funding, and ultimately their existence.

Is this smaller bore a Brit thing?
4  Creation and Performance / Performance / Re: Why not the small bore for "legit" or classical style playing? on: Feb 21, 2017, 01:03AM

I'm not trying to be close minded. I've just been playing long enough to see the beginning of a wave toward smaller bones completely smashed and buried in another 35 years of large bore horns.


"One Trombone to Rule Them All", then?

 

5  Creation and Performance / The Healthy Trombonist / Re: Ear wax again on: Feb 20, 2017, 09:32AM
I had hard wax in my ears from years of wearing earplugs and had them syringed and tried the usual products like Otex (in the UK) with no luck . I found the best way for me was apply the Otex, let it soak and then very gently rub it around using cotton ear buds, and yes I know that this is not advised, also applying warm soapy water in the shower.
Once you've had your ears syringed I believe that they become more likely to wax up again, so a regular regime of ear cleaning may become necessary.
A bonus is that the volume level of my tinnitus seams to have reduced and is higher in frequency, so easier to live with.
6  Teaching & Learning / Practice Room / Re: Bebop Lines & alternate positions on: Feb 20, 2017, 06:43AM
On Donna Lee, bar 2 the A to the C is a nice fit in 6th, and in bar 3 the triplet Gb Ab Gb using 5 7 5, with a 6 position either side of it. Bar 14 has a chromatic run, G down to E, 4 5 6 7. In fact the whole piece is alive with opportunities for elegant slide shifts. 

7  Teaching & Learning / Practice Room / Re: Bebop Lines & alternate positions on: Feb 19, 2017, 01:53PM
Glad to see that this topic has got legs. I don't see tonal differences between a note being played in "alternate" positions being an issue. After all, string players will play up and down a single string to exploit the particular character of a string, a famous example being https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Air_on_the_G_String

Also, the slightly less focused tone is good for playing quieter background lines. I couldn't do the gigs that I do without using as many position options as possible, the keys are so Tbn unfriendly and a trigger wouldn't  help much either.

For anyone who wants get into this, my tips would be, try to learn where EVERY note is on the tbn. Start with the more widely used ones, F in 1 4 6, E in 2 5 7. Bb in 1 3 5.. Find part scales wherever you can, Pentatonics are a good spring board toward this, try to stay beyond the bell. Explore and experiment.
8  Teaching & Learning / Practice Room / Re: Bebop Lines & alternate positions on: Feb 19, 2017, 08:53AM
Is D5 in fourth position an alternate? Because it is nearly always my first choice, rather than in first position. However D5 in seventh I find is just about impossible.

What positions are considered alternate for F5 and G5?

Certainly for the very fast tempos used in Bebop you must use the alternate positions, else you have got no hope of phrasing smoothly.


To clean up the lower positions I use tri-tones. So in the bass stave play B to F, 7-6 and then play up the slide as much as you want to. Then, in the stave F to B, 6-7. Minor 3rds 6-7. Minor 7ths chords 4-5 position etc..

Not sure where F5 and G5 is Tbn wise.
9  Teaching & Learning / Practice Room / Re: Bebop Lines & alternate positions on: Feb 18, 2017, 04:09PM
"Much of the difficulty players have with  these positions is psychological. "Alternate",  "optional"…they both sound like second choices, like something  you might do when you run out of options. I like to call them "extended" positions, and I fully believe that they are not only equal in value to the more closed positions most of us are taught as beginners, but are in many ways superior."

I totally agree with this quote of Sabutin's, and they're not hard to use either, considering how much of the standard trombone warm-up uses them.
10  Horns, Gear, and Equipment / Repairs, Modifications and Maintenance / Re: A little experiment with Silicone lubrication... on: Feb 18, 2017, 01:33AM
Might the Ph of water sprayed on have a bearing here?

I write this because I now live in a soft water area, and don't have the same amount of slide lubricant degradation that I had when I lived in London, which is/was very hard.
11  Horns, Gear, and Equipment / Repairs, Modifications and Maintenance / Re: A little experiment with Silicone lubrication... on: Feb 17, 2017, 07:33AM
Might the Ph of water sprayed on have a bearing here?
12  Horns, Gear, and Equipment / Mouthpieces / Re: New Yamaha TMPSL Plastic Mouthpiece on: Feb 16, 2017, 12:17PM
I want to know what "can not be attached to the main body" means.  Does it not fit a standard trombone receiver?

I think that means that it won't get stuck in.
13  Horns, Gear, and Equipment / Instruments / Re: Richard Smith, still nutty on: Feb 16, 2017, 12:11PM
I took the liberty of copying this link from a topic by boneick.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iCQFMr4Wwb0

Seems applicable.
14  Teaching & Learning / Practice Room / Re: Choosing a Parduba Double-Cup mouthpiece on: Feb 16, 2017, 06:41AM
If you want to get really bright sound on tenor and have enough consistency, easy articulations up there and be able to get really brassy if you need, what do you choose? A 12C? Or something else?

It may sound strange but I imagine that it would be good to have a mouthpiece that give a tenor a kind of crossover between Tommy Dorsey and Trombone Shorty? (no, I am not comparing them, I mean just sound wise).

I mean, I want to remain lyrical but bright when playing those high note lyrical solos, but be able to muscle up things a bit when doing funky stuff. I am a rather novice on trombone, though having already a pretty decent range.

Do I really need two different mouthpieces for this? Or is it more depending on the horn?

Try a Jet Tone Buddy Morrow, it's a similar width to an 11C but with an "inverted" cup. I wouldn't  use one now but it worked well with a shockingly dead Bach 12 horn.
15  Creation and Performance / Performance / Re: Why not the small bore for "legit" or classical style playing? on: Feb 16, 2017, 03:59AM
Maybe it's time to look outside of the US for ideas in tbn manufacture. Smaller bores, ("smaller"and not small.. ) tone rings, heavier bells, possibly unsoldered, etc etc.
My K+H which IS a small bore, plays bigger than any 2B that I've owned, and that's not to say that I'd recommend it for orchestral work, but I find it interesting to see how manufacturers elsewhere, especially in the countries where much of the orchestral repertoire originated approach this topic.
16  Creation and Performance / Performance / Re: Why not the small bore for "legit" or classical style playing? on: Feb 15, 2017, 02:23PM
Bruce... your comments on the sound of British orchestras playing small bore trombones... are these based on hearing actual recordings ?

Chris Stearn

As a kid (in the early 60's) we got to attend free orchestral concerts (during class time!), and I can remember the thrill of hearing a brass section playing "vivid", in pieces like Scheherazade and Young Person Guide etc. That's never left me, heavy modern brass doesn't just doesn't have the range of colour that I like.

There, I said it..

 

17  Teaching & Learning / Pedagogy / Re: Heresy! Pure Heresy! on: Feb 14, 2017, 07:29AM
 
I don't think you deliberately play above or below while performing, I think you have a timbre in your head and you try to match it.  But probably experimenting with deliberately lipping up or down lets you experience different timbres and choose what you want.


This would be my best guess as well. It is a little strange to me that an accomplished player could play any other way though.
18  Teaching & Learning / Pedagogy / Re: Heresy! Pure Heresy! on: Feb 13, 2017, 01:03PM
I've been trying the breathing which I understand, but it's this "top of the note" that still baffles me. Any new input or thoughts on this?
19  Creation and Performance / Performance / Re: Some of my jazz improvisation. Feel free to comment. on: Feb 13, 2017, 01:26AM
I saw no malice  :).  I just don't think there's much to be gained by further questioning Mr Acree's motives.  I appreciated the opportunity to hear some music I hadn't heard.  Some criticism is constructive, some isn't, including that based on assumptions regarding the musical tastes of his audience (which, I hasten to add, you did not make, or at least voice).  If he were unable to attract an audience, and came here asking the denizens of an internet forum why they thought that might be, then fair enough.


I don't think that anything will be gained, but did the great artists in every genre baulk at criticism? If I where to ask for an opinion of my playing, as an older person I would assume that most of the responses had some value, sure some would be hard to take, but I wouldn't be looking for validation either.
To put ones music out and advise of that is one thing, asking for comments is another thing altogether. That's FaceBook and Twitter territory..
20  Classified Advertisements / Classified Advertisements / Re: Missing Thein Mouthpieces - TMEA on: Feb 12, 2017, 03:26PM
Why not? Cross border disputes and whatnot?

Shouldn't be, both countries are in the Eurozone.
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