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1088305 Posts in 71904 Topics- by 19303 Members - Latest Member: erin3140
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1  Horns, Gear, and Equipment / Instruments / Re: Double valve tenor on: Dec 08, 2017, 07:06AM
I just like instruments with lots of devices to pull, push, rotate and so on.... :D :D :D
2  Creation and Performance / Trombonists / Re: Trombone players with great Articulations on: Dec 05, 2017, 06:08AM
Nobody mentioned Wycliffe...!

You just did! :shuffle:
3  Horns, Gear, and Equipment / Instruments / Re: Double valve tenor on: Dec 03, 2017, 09:08AM
Why not add a third valve while we're at it, solder the handslide in place, play French Horn and Bass Trumpet parts and call it a day.

FWIW, Shires tried them in the early 2000's and it didn't catch on.

They (Schagerl) did. And Holton before them too (piston though). It is called a superbone....
4  Teaching & Learning / Practice Room / Re: How do you hold your horn? on: Nov 29, 2017, 08:33AM
Recently I noticed that lot of the straight (probably small bore too, but not necessarily) trombone folks seem to prefer holding the tbone in a position where the slide is paralel to the ground and the bell sits on the top, not to the sides...is there any advantage to that?
5  Horns, Gear, and Equipment / Repairs, Modifications and Maintenance / Re: A valve concept I've been conteplating for a while.... on: Nov 29, 2017, 08:29AM
I am sure they didn't chop up original slide. The whole point is to have the ability to plug in a second valve and not modify a very special horn. Not hard to acquire a second slide.

That sounds plausible.
6  Horns, Gear, and Equipment / Repairs, Modifications and Maintenance / Re: A valve concept I've been conteplating for a while.... on: Nov 29, 2017, 07:53AM
Not really, but closer. Probably I should have menetioned rotary valves. Anton Possegger was the artisan who tried. He was already doing this with rotary trumpets, as pictured below:



You can see that the leadpipe+tuning slide combo is as on piston trumpets, which is isupposed to give a litttle bit more power, which is useful in big bands and comercial settings (the usual rotary trumpet setup is short leadpipe as on flugels).

In one sentence, it didn't worked, though he tried, which was still nice of him. But not all seemingly good ideas are bound to live a long live.

He did also trumpet style tuning slides on flugelhorns sucessfully:



But combining the two piston trumpet related elements in the same flugel seem to have given him some headaches...
7  Horns, Gear, and Equipment / Repairs, Modifications and Maintenance / Re: A valve concept I've been conteplating for a while.... on: Nov 29, 2017, 07:13AM
If something has been already done and the designers have given up on it, in 9 out of 10 cases for a good reason. I was fantasizing about a Flugelhorn with a trumpet length leadpipe and trumpet style tuning slide. But no artisan would accept one, who tried an failed (he said there was unacceptable intonation issues on that horn)...so I gave up on the trumpet length leadpipe. Which was wise to do.
8  Creation and Performance / Musical Miscellany / Chloé Short disabilities and playing in the band on: Nov 29, 2017, 02:12AM
I found her story impressive and heart-warming. Although she has a disability affecting her joints, she found a way to play the Euphonium, hopefully without hurting herself.

I only founded this video on Facebook https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=10213655781124108&id=1091643641

But you can find some videos of her practicing on YouTube.
9  Teaching & Learning / Practice Room / Re: Playalong for improving tone and intonation on: Nov 28, 2017, 10:39AM
The way I see it (jazzer or not) we speak of two different issues here.

1. Abillity to hear pitches in your head - here all the play along, singing and wistling your parts can be very much of help

2. The abillity to modify the pitch as you play....this raise another two issues  Clever
a/ micropositions on your instrument and slide technique - this I will leave to more experienced slider than I am.
b/ the abillity to lip the pitches down or up...bending notes, playing between harmonics (there is a post of mine about this) can be very helpful.
10  Teaching & Learning / Composition, Arranging and Theory / Re: New Big Band compostion on: Nov 24, 2017, 05:36AM
Nice...Though it would have been nice to put some really instrument specific lick on tbones and trumpets.
11  Teaching & Learning / Practice Room / Re: Playalong for improving tone and intonation on: Nov 23, 2017, 02:52AM
If you are into jazz/pop tunes and already have your music sheets or know some cool tunes, IrealPro is a lot for 15$.

You can also write your own stuff there.

Not to compete with all what was mentioned by all the above posters.
12  Teaching & Learning / Practice Room / Re: Full sound, whisper tones etc. on: Nov 14, 2017, 03:50AM
Who is Olov?
13  Teaching & Learning / Practice Room / Re: Full sound, whisper tones etc. on: Nov 13, 2017, 09:55AM
I guess that we are going nowhere with this.

Bashing Wynton is not my thing. There are others trumpet/flugelish players who used it for a certain effect, and did it very efficiently, as far as I am concerned.

True, never heard any low brass jazzers do that. It may be a trumpet/Flügel Horn thing only.

14  Horns, Gear, and Equipment / Accessories / Re: Practice mute more free blowing and more loud than bremner on: Nov 13, 2017, 03:08AM
Basically, the practice mutes existe because there are people buying them  Clever

Some practice mutes mute more than most other mute could. If sounding a bit louder is not an issue, I don't really see reason to buy a practice mute, whatever the brand is. You could use a cup or Harmon without the stem (but in the latter, intonation in low register can be troublesome.)

My first practice mute (on trumpet) was silent brass. I no more use it as practice mute but only with an FX processor...

Best brass and Brenner mutes seem to be the best practices mutes for both trombone a trumpet. However, they are really for soft dynamics practice, loud playing on those mutes for extended periods of time can confuse your chops. Definitely not good.
15  Horns, Gear, and Equipment / Accessories / Re: Practice mute more free blowing and more loud than bremner on: Nov 13, 2017, 02:25AM
Any adjustable cup mute. You can control the volume and the resistance.
16  Teaching & Learning / Practice Room / Re: Full sound, whisper tones etc. on: Nov 13, 2017, 12:41AM
I am not playing for now, nor I am doing anything that requires substantial physical efforts (doctor's orders)

To make it really clear:

1. Full sound - no need for explication

2. Whisper tone, aka airy fuzzy sound:

I believe that you can, and probably should practice those. But made at will, not by mistake or as caused by excessive playing or deficient embouchure.

From my discussion on the subject with Sam Burtis:

"Yes. very quiet playing at the very least. Also...and this is similar in nature...what I call "half-buzzes," where the m'pce (in or out of the horn)...is held so lightly in contact w/the chops that one can buzz whole scales w/out moving the slide, and do it very quietly."

Hope Sam doesn't mind me sharing that.

https://youtu.be/jztGQW7fml8
https://youtu.be/VfL2tedA8xY

Those are two different approaches, but both are related somehow to my questions. Hope that makes it cluster. I'll check Kay Whinding though now. Lots of time for listening music  :/ 
 
17  Teaching & Learning / Practice Room / Full sound, whisper tones etc. on: Nov 12, 2017, 02:12PM
I am in the process of experimentation (more mentally than physically, as I am still recovering from hernia surgery) in the making and using (mostly for jazz I guess) different nuances/colours between full sound (as in classical) and airy sound up to the whispering/sub tones (in other words how to make chops flexible enough to be able to make any of the above at will (not interested in double buzz and airy sound provoked by embouchure and endurance deficiencies).
18  Teaching & Learning / Practice Room / Re: Engaging your abs on: Nov 12, 2017, 09:27AM
Also of note in this thread is that the infamous "trumpet player passing out after a high note" is most definitely caused by excessive tension in the body,

Depending on the context. From what I know it is rather caused by overbreathing (too much oxigen in the brain)
 Passing after such a chart:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O8QQoLMBkE0

would be hardly a surprise.

To me compression bith in the lungs and in the mouth+control and efficient body use seem to be the answer (may be somewhat different depending on our own make up).
19  Teaching & Learning / Practice Room / Re: The aging trombonist (and how to do it gracefully) on: Nov 12, 2017, 05:33AM
Geezer,

these are all valid points. However, I believe that as age advances, especially 55+, one should be more careful to any body abuse signals - muscles are more prone to tearing, bones to breaking, you should be more attentive to any excessive physical strain wether muscles, bones, ligaments or internal organs are concerned.

Of course, control and correct technique rules over brute force in any age.
20  Teaching & Learning / Practice Room / Re: The aging trombonist (and how to do it gracefully) on: Nov 12, 2017, 05:00AM
I think age is not as much of an issue as whether you're playing correctly for your own physical makeup.  If you're not, you're going to be suffering from it at any age, just a little more able to get by when you're younger.

Longstanding incorrect habits are harder to change.  Especially if you deny their existence, which a lot of players are very stubborn about.

Right on. My first serious atempt at owning the trumpet lead range ended with an abdominal hernia (my brother is not a musician nor he has to do any hard physical labour as an IT engineer, but got one as well). Still, that made me think about my not so correct posture and less than perfect body use...
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