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1063494 Posts in 70674 Topics- by 18585 Members - Latest Member: JohnWest
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1  Horns, Gear, and Equipment / Instruments / Re: Development of an Ergonomic Euphonium on: Apr 26, 2017, 12:08PM
Impossible! According to Robb Stewart at least:
https://www.robbstewart.com/slide-flugelhorn/


Really?

https://www.facebook.com/emerson.brito.92/videos/656030827865169/?pnref=story

https://www.jstor.org/stable/842631?seq=1#fndtn-page_thumbnails_tab_contents

Well...the following is more of a joke:

https://www.facebook.com/slidetuba/photos/a.339464879429521.75128.339464786096197/339464886096187/?type=1&theater
2  Teaching & Learning / Practice Room / Re: Developing centred notes on: Apr 26, 2017, 03:15AM
I'm not in disagreement with Doug's statement...or at least I think so. You can treat a specific problem in your playing, that it may refer to a specific use of any given anatomic part of the system, but it is likely to alter sympatheticaly other variables. Hopefully without hi-jacking this thread I'm going to post a video of Thomas Stevens speaking about Schlossberg trumpet teachings...It was interesting to hear that he would only give exercises that treat students weaknesses/liabilities and would not even touch on things that are workong well.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bpQFdDgeRWc
3  Teaching & Learning / Practice Room / Re: Developing centred notes on: Apr 26, 2017, 12:12AM
Willy,
 
It function as a system, not a modular horn where you isolate different elements and tweak them. When you change one aspect of you playing this often has influence on other aspects/variables as well.
4  Horns, Gear, and Equipment / Instruments / Re: Development of an Ergonomic Euphonium on: Apr 25, 2017, 03:41PM
 :/ I am still waiting to see somebody building a slidephonium....
5  Horns, Gear, and Equipment / Instruments / Re: Development of an Ergonomic Euphonium on: Apr 25, 2017, 03:04PM
BTW,

We all have our own preferences. When I was a student in Switzerland my teacher got a call for trumpeters from the Swiss Brass Week to perform a piece for 25 trumpets by Thomas Stevens.

When we got there on the day we rehearsed and performed that noisy thing, there were presentations going on by Steven Mead and an American tubist (I can't recall the name).

First came in Steven Mead saying that 3+1 was the best configuration, explained why than played the hell out of that 3+1 euphonium.
Than the tubist (the guy was unstoppable, he played all the day on his tuba, stopped just during Steven's presentation) who was playing on a front inline 4 piston tuba, said that this was best than Steven's euphonium configuration and played the hell out of that tuba.
6  Horns, Gear, and Equipment / Instruments / Re: Development of an Ergonomic Euphonium on: Apr 25, 2017, 02:45PM
Now one thing I've never understood is why they don't put trigger slides on trumpets like they do on cornets. Getting kids to push a 3rd valve slide out isn't easy

Saddle/Ring is often more precise than a trigger. Some prefer triggers, other (mostly classical) prefer to not have a spring attached to the slide and just a saddle/ring with a stop rod.

The other thing about no spring system is that the possible stroke is bigger, which is useful for those orchestral pieces where a trumpet need to play a low F, which would be most probably imposssible with triggers, unless you have a dumb slide which you can extend to some degree (in this case you will have to alter fingerings accordingly).
7  Teaching & Learning / Practice Room / Re: Developing centred notes on: Apr 25, 2017, 02:08PM
Sure...so you got a fiddler  :D I am another one, but I tend to keep my fiddles....
8  Horns, Gear, and Equipment / Instruments / Re: Development of an Ergonomic Euphonium on: Apr 25, 2017, 02:01PM
Didn't really think it through, I don't have lots of experience with euphoniums...However, on piccolo trumpet this could be low g/a, though this can be played by 1+3/3. 1+3/4 would give you actually a 1/4 tone thrill or something like it. I can easily imagine it in a modern/contemporary literature, though I cannot be sure it exists. Still I prefer not to use the pinky if I have another option. Even for more traditional fingerings like 1+2;1+3;1;2;1+2+3/4. Especially on an instrument such as an euphonium where the stroke is larger and the springs may be harder/stronger.

We surely can figure it out and train the independence of our fingers. I speak of preference, not necessity. When the instrument doesn't give an option a man do what he got to do.
9  Horns, Gear, and Equipment / Instruments / Re: Development of an Ergonomic Euphonium on: Apr 25, 2017, 01:01PM
I've often wondered about the rationale for the 3+1 valve setup.

The pinky is weaker and if you have trills between 3 and 4 or any other simultaneous movements it is kind of tricky, unless you are a spiderman  :/

Personally, I always prefered the use the left hand index on a 4 piston piccolo trumpets whenever possible.
10  Teaching & Learning / Practice Room / Re: Developing centred notes on: Apr 25, 2017, 12:20PM
Normally I'd agree, but he's short with a small build and also the slide was long on him. He wanted to give it a go, and has tried a few other instruments since. A very musical guy, plays nice guitar and someone that I used to play a lot of duo gigs with.
But as I said, it was shocking how good his tone was right off the bat.

If he was so natural in getting good tone why not try a short slide (like on some courtois horns) or a valved horn (valve trombone, bass trumpet or something similar...)
11  Teaching & Learning / Practice Room / Re: Developing centred notes on: Apr 25, 2017, 09:23AM
Chris just meant that there are no shortcuts to real practice and mindful work. Playing on a professional level takes time....sometimes we need years to really get what we've been taught  :/ that's how life goes. As for brass players that you can look up to for embouchure management there are quite a few:

1. James Morisson is my favourite for his abillity to sound terrific on so many instruments https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0uuus2cXzRY
2. Terry Clark
3. Allen Vizzuti
4. Derek was also amazingly efficient player - I believe that he could probably play all the day long without getting tired
5. Bill Watrous made look everything so effortless, so did Wycliffe

The list can be continued...
12  Teaching & Learning / Practice Room / Re: Volume vs phrasing on: Apr 25, 2017, 06:25AM
Not because the lack of oxygen screwed up that part of their brain :D, but because there are few bass trombonists in general.

Can you support that claim of yours with a scientific proof?  :/
13  Teaching & Learning / Practice Room / Re: Developing centred notes on: Apr 25, 2017, 04:43AM
Shouldn't playing a wind instrument improve his condition than rather making it worst? Just thinking out loud...
14  Teaching & Learning / Practice Room / Re: Developing centred notes on: Apr 24, 2017, 09:21AM
The term "sweet spot" is used in many other endeavors as well. It's a great term!

Well...If I can put a smile on all ladies' faces in the room just by sounding a horn (whatever piece of brass I have in my hands to play with) than probably I have found that sweet spot...  :D
15  Teaching & Learning / Practice Room / Re: Volume vs phrasing on: Apr 24, 2017, 08:55AM
You can try to improve your air handling (not actual capacity) with things like the Breathing Gym, which might help a little.  If you are a geezer like me, your lungs have a lot less capacity than they did when you were younger.

A bit of a side note perhaps, because I saw that in some LSO trumpet stars, but seems to fit well in that case.

By the time when Maurice Murphy and Rod Franks were still sharing the 1st chair in the LSO you could observe 2 very distinctive style of air management:

1. Rod Franks - he didn't have any (to my knowledge) health issues, so he like often to do long phrases in one breath, so did James Watson (The first lesson I had with him he made me play the first phrase of the Hindemith Sonata in one breath)
2. Maurice Murphy - he had some issues with his lungs (a chronic bronchitis or something of the kind) but he could take breaths so quickly, that one would barely notice it, especially in section playing.
16  Teaching & Learning / Practice Room / Re: Developing centred notes on: Apr 24, 2017, 08:44AM
Personally I like the terms vibrant and sweet spot. The latter is often used to tuning as well, as many horns have relatively defined tolerancies on tuning, and departing of it often creates both timbral and intonation issues.
17  Creation and Performance / Trombonists / Re: Watrous Interview on: Apr 24, 2017, 06:44AM
IMHO (I never met Bill, and I am rather a novice on trombone) we don't get the whole story there about Bill, father and their relationship. Everybody seems to say that Bill is a rather a ordinary, kind guy who has his bad moods now and then. Seem to me like a normal person. But we don't know how charged with negative emotions this father-son relationship was.

Of course, saying that your father freed you when he died is probably an awful thing to say, but we don't really don't know the context. It still kind of brave to open up in front of the whole world and say something that may provoke some criticism.
18  Practice Break / Found on the 'Net / Re: Am I The Only One To Cringe? on: Apr 24, 2017, 02:10AM
Which is worse: hanging it by the handslide, or hanging it by the tuning slide? Yeah, RIGHT.

+1. These are guitar/violin wall display hangers...I wonder why a wind instrument company would use this. One would rather thing that they should rather have in stock appropriate brass instrument display hangers, crooks etc....
19  Teaching & Learning / Practice Room / Re: Developing centred notes on: Apr 24, 2017, 12:57AM
Yes, Leif... concept is king
Absolutely. Everybody tricks their mind in a different fashion. Sound and efficiency is what takes lead.
20  Teaching & Learning / Practice Room / Re: Similar to Bordogni on: Apr 23, 2017, 07:01AM
I guess that Concone Vocalises can be used as well, but they are hardly any more modern than Bordogni's...
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