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1097054 Posts in 72565 Topics- by 19541 Members - Latest Member: Zorgnot
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1  Teaching & Learning / Pedagogy / Re: Stevens-Costello Palm Exercise adapted for tenor trombone on: Feb 15, 2018, 04:45AM
That's obvious, Geez. Not a novice as far as embouchure technique. But I feel that I'll have to take few lessons to really advance my slide technique and resolve some issues that are very specific to the slide trombone technique, like grip and efficient body use as related to holding a trombone.
2  Teaching & Learning / Pedagogy / Re: Maggio on: Feb 15, 2018, 03:27AM
There is a lot of truth  in Samīs saying try everything use what works. But stop doing things that do not work even if it works for somebody else.

I like very much this philosophy of his. Trying to implement it as much as I can manage. I was very sceptical when Larry first suggested this Costello set up. But it works for me, though there was a period where I was very inconsistent and my tonguing was really sloppy. In the low tbone register it still is, but I really never practiced it consistently.
3  Teaching & Learning / Pedagogy / Re: Stevens-Costello Palm Exercise adapted for tenor trombone on: Feb 14, 2018, 11:59PM
I must admit, Doug, that you are absolutely right. However, contrary to what everyone on this site was trying to teach me (I can be very stubborn occasionally) when I reached a plateau on my trombone high register development aligning jaws and using the Costello embouchure setup (basically the Maggio setup of superpucker with aligned jaws) made me go higher with less pressure.
To be honest, when starting on this setup it felt weirder on Trombone that it feels on trumpet. But it works for me (no, I don't have any trauma). Will the palm exercise give me the above mentioned benefits - I don't really know, but I don't see how it may hurt my playing... except for eventually wasted time on it.
4  Teaching & Learning / Pedagogy / Re: Maggio on: Feb 14, 2018, 03:22PM
I was told that Costello had a large number of trombone students and that the exercise I came up with was used by him with his tbone students. So far, it seems like no Costello trombone student has commented on my experiments here or on Facebook.
5  Teaching & Learning / Pedagogy / Re: Maggio on: Feb 14, 2018, 03:10PM
There is plenty....I don't know the Maggio history, you may be right about it.
Costello and later Cat Anderson developped it a bit further. Many lead trumpeter used it, and some still do. As far as my experience go, this setup (the Maggio setup didn't included aligned jaws setup, I think that someone afterwards came with that idea, I use the aligned setup) promotes vibrant and ligther sound, which may not necessarily be the best for orchestral (classical setup). Some classical solo artist use it, but the result is often a brighter sound (aka Maurice Andre). His successor such as Costello and Anderson have developed some isometric exercises for augmenting the strength and the aperture control that are sometimes questioned.
6  Teaching & Learning / Pedagogy / Re: Maggio on: Feb 14, 2018, 02:51PM
You can get some audible results in 5 weeks, but I don't think you do the whole thing in 5 weeks....does that makes sense?
7  Teaching & Learning / Pedagogy / Re: Stevens-Costello Palm Exercise adapted for tenor trombone on: Feb 14, 2018, 02:44PM
Thanks Geez,

I use now IrealPro app, it gives me more back tracks that I can handle - jazz, pop, italian etc...it is very rare to wish for something that cannot be obtained with a click. Basically it is a light version of Band-in-A-box and works well for me. But thanks for the offer, If I want to do something that I cannot find, I may give you a shout.
8  Teaching & Learning / Pedagogy / Re: Stevens-Costello Palm Exercise adapted for tenor trombone on: Feb 14, 2018, 02:25PM
Geez,

I cannot be sure, as I was advancing quite a bit my range on trumpet as I was trying to find my path with the bone. Certainly it makes some good as far as breathing is concerned (When I started my BMus at the conservatory, my trumpet teacher had this idea - to transfer me to his brother, teacher of Tuba, so I can learn to breath).

Another benefit is that with time I learned to adapt more quickly to very different sizes of mouthpieces. But I practiced the switch very consistently to get there. Hope that helps.

In the middle of that adventure I got an inguinal hernia, but I got surgery treatment and I am back to serious playing now.

The negative - playing for long period (like an hour) on trombone reduces my reliability and top register on trumpet if I have to switch right away to trumpet. But I see that with time I learn to get a little better with it. What James Morisson does is a hard job, don't be fooled.
9  Teaching & Learning / Pedagogy / Re: Stevens-Costello Palm Exercise adapted for tenor trombone on: Feb 14, 2018, 02:17PM
There is more than one way to go to Rome (no disrespect intended, Doug  :) )

I already have a range to boast with that most players with one 1 year of experience can envy me for. Actually, I have more range, that I can manage with my slide technique (which needs some serious attention, guilty as charged). Anyway, without being argumentative, let me do it for a little while and we'll see how it works. I don't see any possible dramatic scenario. In the worst case, I may decide that it is not good enough and continue just play the tbone the common way.
10  Teaching & Learning / Pedagogy / Re: Stevens-Costello Palm Exercise adapted for tenor trombone on: Feb 14, 2018, 10:52AM
Macbeth?  :D to chimp or not to chimp, that's the question
11  Teaching & Learning / Pedagogy / Re: Stevens-Costello Palm Exercise adapted for tenor trombone on: Feb 14, 2018, 10:14AM
It's possible to put the trombone on a piece of furniture and play it that way. I haven't tried yet. Worth trying though.
Maggio is definitely a rolled out embouchure. Look for the famous Maggio Monkey.
12  Teaching & Learning / Pedagogy / Re: Stevens-Costello Palm Exercise adapted for tenor trombone on: Feb 14, 2018, 08:48AM
Yes, Timothy, I try to balance the horn on my palm while playing (just partials indeed, right hand takes no participation in the act.

Trumpet is lighter and its construction makes the act easier (I hardly imagine this on a trigger or even less on bass trombones).

I also imagine that placing some kind of wrap support may facilitate that act, but not sure how harmless would that be for the trombone.

It's more of an experimentation, but my teacher, Larry Meregillano (trumpet) says that Costello had many trombone students and had done similar work with them. That was just my first attempt at it, I will need a bit more of experimentation how to do it with less effort, so I direct all my attention to airflow, body use and embouchure development. I am rather confident about its chances to give the above mentioned benefits.

In short, Costello advocated palm exercise, pencil exercise and unfurled embouchure (you can thing of Maggio as well)
13  Teaching & Learning / Pedagogy / Re: Stevens-Costello Palm Exercise adapted for tenor trombone on: Feb 14, 2018, 08:31AM
On trumpet it is easier. It actually forces you to play with less pressure in the high register. With time and getting used to it  helps with high register. It did augment my high range on trumpet with a 5th (combined with the pencil exercise).
14  Teaching & Learning / Pedagogy / Stevens-Costello Palm Exercise adapted for tenor trombone on: Feb 14, 2018, 07:36AM
For quite of time I thought of adapting this for trombone...I came up with something, it may be not perfect, but it works.

Feel free to comment. I would be particularly interested in feedback of any Costello trombone students, but anyone is wellcome to.

https://youtu.be/m3tVgEXxtQo
15  Teaching & Learning / Practice Room / Playing against the grain and tone quality on: Feb 05, 2018, 06:14AM
I tried to recycle an old thread, but it didn't work.

I made a video to check how things are going on after switching to small bore
Here it is:
https://youtu.be/82xsehJRDiw

I tried to accomplish few things while playing the famous tune:
1. Play as softly as possible while maintaining tone quality and airflow as much as possible - not a complete succes, but not too bad
2. Playing against the grain where appropriate - this is a big one - I seem to have double buzz issues when trying to do it, and breaking the smoothness of the transitions.
3. Hand vibrato - seems like is too slow, what do you reckon?
4. High notes seem to be mostly ok, though the end of a practice session may not be best for recording stuff.
16  Teaching & Learning / Beginners and Returning Trombonists / Re: 3-4 weeks after I started on: Feb 04, 2018, 12:00PM
One year after...

I am still adapting to the small bore, but It makes life easier.

Did some soft practice, while trying to keep consistent airflow (not always successful, sometimes smoothness of execution suffers from it).

Another issue I see is when I try to play against the grain - tone quality is not so great, so I accept advices on that.

https://youtu.be/82xsehJRDiw
17  Teaching & Learning / Practice Room / Re: High Register, whisper g closed teeth and other "cheats" on: Jan 05, 2018, 02:08PM
Allen is awesome, but I noticed that lately (at least on the video I saw) he pivots a lot less than back then.
18  Teaching & Learning / Practice Room / Re: High Register, whisper g closed teeth and other "cheats" on: Jan 05, 2018, 08:23AM
I do :-) I didn't start this before starting lessons with Larry Meregillano. My present goal is to be able to play consistently up to high G (on trumpet) with minimal pressure and effort more than blasting screaming double Cs.

Before starting lessons with Larry my upper range efforts brought me an inguinal hernia. So far I managed to minimize quite a lot the pressure and efforts for up to high C/D. I think that I am going in a good direction. What I learn from my trumpet lessons I try to movement also in my tbone embouchure, I think that generally it works, though the bigger mp presents some additional challenges.

19  Teaching & Learning / Practice Room / Re: High Register, whisper g closed teeth and other "cheats" on: Jan 05, 2018, 07:11AM
I think it is both strength, aperture and airstream exercise. Cat claimed to do it every evening for 20 min without releasing the embouchure setting. When you try to do it that long, you understand why it is good also for endurance.
20  Teaching & Learning / Practice Room / Re: High Register, whisper g closed teeth and other "cheats" on: Jan 05, 2018, 02:43AM
Disclaimer: the unfurled embouchure makes me sound brighter, both on trumpet and trombone (so does the jaws alignment) I find it efficient, but not necessarily something appropriate for an orchestral player, or somebody who looks to sound big and dark).

A side observation: I recorded myself with my smart phone camera, after more than a month break...I sounded awful. Recording using on a SM137 sounded fine....room acoustics and a bad audio pickup from the phone camera did fool me.
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