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1069895 Posts in 71006 Topics- by 18773 Members - Latest Member: deezel901
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The Trombone ForumRecent Posts
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 51 
 on: Today at 11:59 AM 
Started by Hitioshi - Last post by JohnL
I spoke with Robert Coomber up at HornGuys yesterday; apparently, there was a period when there weren't any Laskey mouthpieces being made. Robert seemed to think that the supply situation would be improving soon.

 52 
 on: Today at 11:56 AM 
Started by Bob Weller - Last post by JohnL
...it's just the 5 minutes between venues that will be warm...
Evil

I will be there all four days, displaying part of my collection. The current plan is to have different horns every day...

 53 
 on: Today at 11:56 AM 
Started by Alex.C - Last post by timothy42b
I had a tooth break at the gumline and the dentist extracted it (I did get a second opinion but that guy agreed too.) 

Later when I could afford it, I had it replaced.  My new dentist said no implant, my jawbone wasn't thick enough at that point.  So he crowned the tooth on each side and made a bridge - there's a tooth in between that is continuous with both crowns. 

I've since repeated this process two other places.  The results are very good, no effect on playing and I can eat more comfortably. 

The cost of the bridge was considerably less than an implant, less than half I think. 

 54 
 on: Today at 11:55 AM 
Started by BillO - Last post by MikeBMiller
If you'd like to know I can point you to a number of scholarly critiques of Ehrman.  His POV has been severely challenged.

Like i said, I stay out of religious discussions as they generally lead to people getting mad at each other over something that cannot be proved or disproved. I read the book, thought it was interesting, and shared the information here. I don't care whether anyone else reads it or not.

 55 
 on: Today at 11:46 AM 
Started by BillO - Last post by John the Theologian
My point is, that if a religion is valid according to those that believe it, then all religions must be valid.  However, the view of religious people is that 99% (or more) of religions are invalid.  That is a striking paradox, don't you think?

Anyway, it was just a digression.

No more than saying our personal political beliefs must be the only valid one since we hold them.  There is a huge difference between saying that we believe is necessarily the truth and it being the truth.  I don't get your point.  You seem to imply that strongly held religious beliefs operate in a different way than other strongly held beliefs.

In other words it looks like you're conflating the existence of a belief with the warrant for a belief.  The 2 are very different.

All of us look at others and say that we agree with some peoples' beliefs, agree partially with some peoples' beliefs, and think others are completely out to lunch.  None of that touches on the truth claims of those particular beliefs, but rather are expressions of our judgments on those beliefs.

 56 
 on: Today at 11:42 AM 
Started by BillO - Last post by John the Theologian
I try to stay out of religious discussions for the most part, but I have read several books by Bart Ehrman, professor of religion at UNC. The book "How Jesus became God" is a fascinating description of how a man whom most thought of as mortal during his time on earth somehow morphed into the savior of all mankind over the course of about 3 centuries.

If you'd like to know I can point you to a number of scholarly critiques of Ehrman.  His POV has been severely challenged.

 57 
 on: Today at 11:41 AM 
Started by BillO - Last post by BillO
I'm not exactly sure what your point is.  The philosophers have also frequently and profoundly disagreed on God when they posit a deity and somtimes their views coincide roughly with views found in various religions.

From a Christian POV, this is just a Romans 1 situation and not all that unexpected, but the diversity of views of God is an obvious given and like any human beliefs most people believe that their beliefs are true, so what's your point?
My point is, that if a religion is valid according to those that believe it, then all religions must be valid.  However, the view of religious people is that 99% (or more) of religions are invalid.  That is a striking paradox, don't you think?

Anyway, it was just a digression.

 58 
 on: Today at 11:41 AM 
Started by BillO - Last post by John the Theologian
No, I agree.  I don't really want to discuss it here.  But talk of the trinity has made me think about my original question and the reason I started this thread.  It appears I was talking about God as he showed himself in the OT.  In the NT God shows himself though Jesus and in a very different way than he is revealed in the OT.

Christians would say yes and no and make a distinction between elementary and final revelation of God, so that ultimately both are needed to fully understand God. Hebrews 1 is all about that distinction.  Let me give you one example:

The famous Shema text in Deuteronomy 6:4 says that the Lord-- the Hebrew term is what we think is pronounced Yahweh, the covenant name for God-- is one, but the Hebrew term for one is not the singular word for one, but rather a term that means something like a composite unity-- it is the same word that is translated one flesh in Genesis 2:24.  The Jewish rabbis understood this and sometimes puzzled over it and tried to figure out how it fit into a unitarian type of monotheism.  A Christian would argue that this is just a very preliminary expression of Trinitarianism that is fleshed out by Christ and the New Testament.

My point is that from a Christian POV the NT record is not only helpful, but crucial to understand God.

 59 
 on: Today at 11:40 AM 
Started by BillO - Last post by MikeBMiller
I try to stay out of religious discussions for the most part, but I have read several books by Bart Ehrman, professor of religion at UNC. The book "How Jesus became God" is a fascinating description of how a man whom most thought of as mortal during his time on earth somehow morphed into the savior of all mankind over the course of about 3 centuries.

 60 
 on: Today at 11:31 AM 
Started by BillO - Last post by BillO
It does affect the interpretation of the OT, often in subtle ways, but I'm not sure that this thread is where we want to discuss that.
No, I agree.  I don't really want to discuss it here.  But talk of the trinity has made me think about my original question and the reason I started this thread.  It appears I was talking about God as he showed himself in the OT.  In the NT God shows himself though Jesus and in a very different way than he is revealed in the OT.

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