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The Trombone ForumTeaching & LearningPractice Room(Moderator: blast) More questions on high range?
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timothy42b
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« Reply #40 on: Jun 15, 2017, 12:46PM »

No doubt.

And applying this to high-range development, I believe that every note we play or even try to play should be from a musicality standpoint.

Hmmm.

That's a start, but there's a limitation when you play A musical NOTE.

I sing with some people who do that.  They put a lot of mental energy into singing the right note.  In fact, that uses all the concentration they have, and they never sing a phrase.  Really no note can exist on its own - it always leads to or comes from somewhere.

Now I've gone off the topic of high range though. 
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Tim Richardson
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« Reply #41 on: Jun 15, 2017, 01:13PM »

Hmmm.

That's a start, but there's a limitation when you play A musical NOTE.

I sing with some people who do that.  They put a lot of mental energy into singing the right note.  In fact, that uses all the concentration they have, and they never sing a phrase.  Really no note can exist on its own - it always leads to or comes from somewhere.

Now I've gone off the topic of high range though. 

Maybe. And despite your ubiquitous bucket of cold water, I believe it can be applied to range-building. Every note that comes out of our horns should exist within a musical frame; or at least a mind-set of trying to make it so. I understand there probably are those who could subvert that concept into weirdness or otherwise Florence Foster Jenkins it up. There always are. But that doesn't mean the concept is invalid. Anyway, that is the premise I try to operate under; whether during range-building or anything else I'm trying to learn.

It's a matter of degree. We have all seen the posts (and I believe I've made some of them!) of middle school students huffing and puffing away mindlessly on long tones vs what I imagine how a top-ranked symphonic trombone player approaches them. Two divergent ends of the same spectrum. It can be applied to range-building efforts as well. Shouldn't we at least try to make our efforts sound nice?

...Geezer
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Pre59

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« Reply #42 on: Jun 16, 2017, 02:09AM »

Yes indeedy - to everything!

We can go Full Monty with cross-grain slurs, using all the alternate positions that fit in; up to as high as we want, with lots of them ending in 6th, #6th, 7th, #7th, etc. Try a cross-grain scale slur from middle C in 3rd, up to high C in 7th, with lots of alternate positions to make as many cross-grain slurs as possible. That high C should not be muscled or forced. Great exercises! The new Remmy!

...Geezer

I'd understand this post a little more easily if you could demonstrate as below...


 I think there are some things that simply can not be learned by most of us from out of a book or dissection on this Forum. I believe some things need to be learned by rote; observation, discussion, demonstration and trial; on a one-on-one basis.

...Geezer

 Hi
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