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Author Topic: Favorite Etudes?  (Read 1499 times)
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Noahharry
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« on: Jun 15, 2017, 11:11PM »

I really want to get into more etude playing.  I've played some Rochuts but not anything extensive.  So... I thought it would be good to ask your opinions on the best etudes.  Preferably you would say which is your favorite lyrical and favorite technical etude,, but anything is appreciated.  Just looking to improve fundamentals and musicality while also having a little fun  (maybe not based on what I hear about some of the Bitschs Evil)  Preferably classical but jazz is also appreciated.

Edit: Looking for specific etudes not etude books.
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Screamin Trombone Playa

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« Reply #1 on: Jun 16, 2017, 01:51AM »

Favorite lyrical etudes: "Lyrical Etudes" by Snedecor
Favorite technical etudes: "32 Etudes for Clarinet" by Rose (Clarinet etudes but many of them work well on trombone)
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BGuttman
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« Reply #2 on: Jun 16, 2017, 03:14AM »

I like Rochut #60.  It's like a little concerto all by itself.  Not something you can dive right into, though.  There are also other Rochut (Bordogni) etudes that are really tuneful.

I don't have a favorite technical study -- they are more "meat and potatoes" and I play the ones that work on what I need to do (when I remember to play them :/ ).

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« Reply #3 on: Jun 16, 2017, 03:52AM »

Call me crazy, but I find the some of the Blazhevich clef studies a lot of fun, although very tricky, to play.  Not that I can whip through them, but there is some really good music in there if you are up for a challenge.   :/
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« Reply #4 on: Jun 16, 2017, 04:33AM »

"Heat Wave" - Music Minus One Ira Nepus series. If you can play this etude technically perfect and with fabulous style, then put your shoes on; go play; get paid.

...Geezer
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« Reply #5 on: Jun 16, 2017, 05:51AM »

The best etude is the one that challenges you on the thing you need to be challenged on.
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« Reply #6 on: Jun 16, 2017, 07:57AM »

I've got the Tommy Pedersen advanced etudes for bass bone....gathering dust somewhere.

As he says in the intro "if you can play these you can play anything". I'll stress the word IF!

I'm sure it'll be the same for tenor
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« Reply #7 on: Jun 16, 2017, 12:40PM »

Two sets:

Douze Etudes by Delguidice

set of etudes in the back of Paul Bernard's Method Complete

these etudes cover technic and musicality
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« Reply #8 on: Jun 16, 2017, 12:40PM »

Two sets:

Douze Etudes by Delguidice

set of etudes in the back of Paul Bernard's Method Complete

these etudes cover technic and musicality
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Ron Smith, D.M. A
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« Reply #9 on: Jun 17, 2017, 08:00PM »

Right now, digging those in Ed Neumeister's book.  I also like J.J.'s.
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« Reply #10 on: Jun 18, 2017, 10:51AM »

I've got the Tommy Pedersen advanced etudes for bass bone....gathering dust somewhere.

As he says in the intro "if you can play these you can play anything". I'll stress the word IF!

I'm sure it'll be the same for tenor

The Pederson etudes for tenor are actually quite playable, and much, much fun. They're really good to have. Out of print but you can get them through inter-library loans and make a copy...

Tyrell progressive etudes. Blazhevich clef studies are very useful to become fluent in clefs, but some of them are also really beautiful music. A must have for any tenor trombonist. His alto studies are hilarious.
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« Reply #11 on: Jun 18, 2017, 11:26AM »

Do the Bach Cello Suites count?
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BillO
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« Reply #12 on: Jun 18, 2017, 01:44PM »

Can you just buy single etudes by themselves?  I'm not familiar with that concept.

What level are you at?

Don't know if the Voxman "Selected Studies for Trombone"  have been mentioned.  Most are quite favorable and would fit into my definition of 'my favorite'.  Most of them are at a mid to high intermediate level.Page 3, 4, 5, 7, 9 (Bohme), 14, 18, 31, 32, 37, 41, 47 all stand out for me.

Also, there a lot of really nice songs out there that can be used as etudes.  Pick your favorites and transcribe them into a suitable software package, then put them in keys or ranges where you need practice.
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« Reply #13 on: Jun 18, 2017, 01:54PM »

Can you just buy single etudes by themselves?  I'm not familiar with that concept.

What level are you at?

Don't know if the Voxman "Selected Studies for Trombone"  have been mentioned.  Most are quite favorable and would fit into my definition of 'my favorite'.  Most of them are at a mid to high intermediate level.Page 3, 4, 5, 7, 9 (Bohme), 14, 18, 31, 32, 37, 41, 47 all stand out for me.

Also, there a lot of really nice songs out there that can be used as etudes.  Pick your favorites and transcribe them into a suitable software package, then put them in keys or ranges where you need practice.

Yes! Why is this such an "out there" concept for most everyone on this Forum.

If we look up the word "etude", we find this: "a short musical composition, typically for one instrument, designed as an exercise to improve the technique or demonstrate the skill of the player." Seems to me almost any written melody, if it can be played on a single instrument is - by definition - an etude. But everyone seems to insist that it means a "classical" piece. I don't get it.

...Geezer
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« Reply #14 on: Jun 18, 2017, 02:47PM »

Yes! Why is this such an "out there" concept for most everyone on this Forum.

If we look up the word "etude", we find this: "a short musical composition, typically for one instrument, designed as an exercise to improve the technique or demonstrate the skill of the player." Seems to me almost any written melody, if it can be played on a single instrument is - by definition - an etude. But everyone seems to insist that it means a "classical" piece. I don't get it.

...Geezer

Presumably, most written melodies are not "designed as an exercise" and are therefore not, by [your] definition, etudes.  Of course, if you find a melody that demonstrates or necessitates a technique, principle or skill that you want or need to work on, then it can be played as an etude.  A well-written collection of etudes will perform this role in a more-or-less explicit way, and be progressive in one way or another (technically and/or conceptually).  None of this means one can't develop one's own collection, but this takes time, and implies that you have some idea of what you're looking for.  In the meantime, an etude book is a useful tool.

They also don't need to be "classical," as for example, the Neumeister and Johnson collections noted earlier.  And any "classical" etude could be played with "non-classical" rhythms and displacements if so desired.
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« Reply #15 on: Jun 18, 2017, 04:07PM »

Naulais.
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« Reply #16 on: Jun 18, 2017, 04:19PM »

Any of the interval exercises in the Arban.

Also, Arban Studies in Dotted Eigths & Sixteenth Notes - #18, #31, and #38.
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« Reply #17 on: Jun 18, 2017, 04:54PM »

Presumably, most written melodies are not "designed as an exercise" and are therefore not, by [your] definition, etudes.  Of course, if you find a melody that demonstrates or necessitates a technique, principle or skill that you want or need to work on, then it can be played as an etude.  A well-written collection of etudes will perform this role in a more-or-less explicit way, and be progressive in one way or another (technically and/or conceptually).  None of this means one can't develop one's own collection, but this takes time, and implies that you have some idea of what you're looking for.  In the meantime, an etude book is a useful tool.

They also don't need to be "classical," as for example, the Neumeister and Johnson collections noted earlier.  And any "classical" etude could be played with "non-classical" rhythms and displacements if so desired.

Every melody I play is for the purpose of advancing my skills; be they technical or musical. And they are often-times grouped into books; maybe not progressively harder as the book goes on, though.

I can play a conventional "etude" out of a conventional "etude" book very well. I can also play "jazz" ballad (etudes). Can those who dwell specifically on the conventional "etudes" play "jazz" ballad etudes as well? If not, then who is the more versatile performer?

...Geezer
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« Reply #18 on: Jun 18, 2017, 06:36PM »

Naulais.

Similar question as the overall thread: although I have subbed on bass several times for each of the past few years, I am mainly a tenor player. I am hoping to get more serious about bass because I love the sound (almost prefer it to tenor) and I have finally been able to acquire a horn (Bach 50) at a price within my reach. Any suggestions on etudes to work on as I develop bass technique & sound? Tenor will still be my main instrument, but I don't want to sound like a tenor player when I get called to play bass.
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« Reply #19 on: Jun 18, 2017, 06:45PM »

Good bass trombone etudes will be a fourth below tenor etudes.  One way to do this is to read your bass clef etudes in tenor clef and drop them an octave.

There is a book by Blume for trombone with F-attachment that is good for development.

I will assume you don't need to learn the trigger positions so something like Ostrander or Raph is not needed.  But they are wonderful introductions to the world of bass trombone.

There are also Tommy Pederson etudes for bass trombone.  I believe Hickey's has some of them.

You can look into the Kauko Kahila Semester of Studies (I think it specifies F tuba, but it works great for bass trombone).
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