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Author Topic: On Mouthpiece Buzzing  (Read 2967 times)
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savio

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« Reply #60 on: Jun 20, 2017, 08:03AM »

Sam, one question. You are of course one with more experience and level in music than most of us others here. You seem to tell us lot of good advices how to buzz the mouthpiece or without. But since all this buzz discussion started with Christian Lindberg tell he dont buzz. And Svenne tell lot of times it fits some but not necessary all players. He tried everything up through the years I think. Now, to the questions.

How could a player like Lindberg become the best solo trombone player in the world without doing any buzzing? Since he have done nearly everything that is possible and not possible on a trombone, could he been doing more if he had been buzzing the mouthpiece? Seems to me he got max out of the trombone?

(That reminds of the word one idiot can ask more than 10 wise can answer. But I think you have an answer somehow :D )

Leif


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sabutin

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« Reply #61 on: Jun 20, 2017, 08:08AM »

I see that the debate "to buzz or not to buzz" rages on.

I believe William Shakespeare commented on this topic some years ago.

"To-morrow, and to-morrow, and to-morrow,
Creeps in this petty pace from day to day,
To the last syllable of recorded time;
And all our yesterdays have lighted fools
The way to dusty death. Out, out, brief candle!
Life's but a walking shadow, a poor player,
That struts and frets his hour upon the stage,
And then is heard no more. It is a tale
Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury,
Signifying nothing."

Macbeth Act 5, scene 5, 19–28

Cosmic!!!

The human condition in a nutshell!!!

Except for say artists on the level of Bach and Mozart and Beethoven and...you know...down the line to people like Jascha Heifetz, Charlie Parker and other musical masters of performance.

But it does not pertain here.

"...a tale told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing."

Perhaps we are all "idiots" simply for wanting to learn how to play our primitive blowtube on the same level as are the greatest pianos and violins. But other than that?

It "signifies" if it helps people to approach closer to their performance goal.

I prefer this one, myself.

Quote
WHOEVER KNOWS THE MYSTERY OF VIBRATIONS INDEED KNOWS ALL THINGS.
       -- Hazrat Inayat Khan

Or perhaps this one:

Quote
A MAN'S INCLINATION IS THE ROOT OF THE TREE OF HIS LIFE.
       -- Hazrat Inayat Khan

Quest on, Patrick.

In the end, it's all we've got.

Later...

S.

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sabutin

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« Reply #62 on: Jun 20, 2017, 08:16AM »

Sam, one question. You are of course one with more experience and level in music than most of us others here. You seem to tell us lot of good advices how to buzz the mouthpiece or without. But since all this buzz discussion started with Christian Lindberg tell he dont buzz. And Svenne tell lot of times it fits some but not necessary all players. He tried everything up through the years I think. Now, to the questions.

How could a player like Lindberg become the best solo trombone player in the world without doing any buzzing? Since he have done nearly everything that is possible and not possible on a trombone, could he been doing more if he had been buzzing the mouthpiece? Seems to me he got max out of the trombone?

Leif

He could have been even better. With or without m'pce buzzing.

None of us ever even approach "perfection."

Bet on it.

Carmine Caruso...over and over again:

Quote
                           We're only human!!!


Bet on that as well.

Later...

S.
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savio

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« Reply #63 on: Jun 20, 2017, 08:36AM »

He could have been even better. With or without m'pce buzzing.

None of us ever even approach "perfection."

Bet on it.

Carmine Caruso...over and over again:

Bet on that as well.

Later...

S.

Thanks, I believe you might are right.

Another question, can buzzing done wrong harm us or destroy development? And what is the most common faults we do?

I actually do some mouthpiece buzzing but mostly as kind of warm up or together with my small students. I never thought of how to do it, we just try to get it buzz and hit the intonation often with a piano.

In music aspects I tend to sing inside me to get the output I want instead of buzzing.

And Sam, could you listen my mp3 in "performance" section and tell me how to play that kind of music? I believe you have done that more than any else here. If you have time of course. The thing is I'm very unsure how to do it, even if I like to play that kind of style.

Leif
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patrickosmith

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« Reply #64 on: Jun 20, 2017, 01:16PM »

Hey Sam,

If it's inspirational quotes from musicians you want, then try this one ...

“At the very 11th hour, an artist might do something that will eclipse everything else.”
Van Cliburn

Best,
Patrick
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Doug Elliott
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« Reply #65 on: Jun 26, 2017, 12:43PM »

In my travels to the ITF right now, We just stopped north of Cambria at the elephant seal viewing area.  I counted about 80 of them on the beach and in the water.

Their vocalizations seem like about 4 hz and it sounds like about a C or D to me.  Some of them are lower and I might identifying the "pitch" as a G below.  I never really thought about low pitches like that before.
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stealthheartocarinaZ
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« Reply #66 on: Jun 26, 2017, 08:18PM »

I actually do agree with this. However, if you are not able to buzz into the mouthpiece, you possibly are not able to buzz into the instrument. My sister cannot buzz her lips at all, much less can she buzz while the ends of her lips are pinched. In my experience, if you are able to buzz into the mouthpiece first, it is much easier to learn how to play the instrument.
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Doug Elliott
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« Reply #67 on: Jun 27, 2017, 12:16AM »

My sister cannot buzz her lips at all, much less can she buzz while the ends of her lips are pinched.

Trying to buzz with pinched lips is a good way to guarantee failure.
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sabutin

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« Reply #68 on: Jun 28, 2017, 04:52AM »

In my travels to the ITF right now, We just stopped north of Cambria at the elephant seal viewing area.  I counted about 80 of them on the beach and in the water.

Their vocalizations seem like about 4 hz and it sounds like about a C or D to me.  Some of them are lower and I might identifying the "pitch" as a G below.  I never really thought about low pitches like that before.

There is a line between frequencies that we identify as pitches and those that we identify as tempos. I haven't done or seen any hard scientific research on this, but my guess is that it is an individual thing exactly where that line may be. If you're interested in the ramifications of this as far as musicians are concerned, go read the intro to my book. I cover it in some detail.

S.
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Visit <http://samburtis.com/>. Lots of information on that site in the form of articles plus a link to my method book "Time, Balance & Connections-A Universal Theory Of Brass Relativity" which includes several chapters of the book.
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