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The Trombone ForumTeaching & LearningBeginners and Returning Trombonists(Moderator: bhcordova) I'm Going To Have My First Trombone/Bass Trombone Lesson
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EWadie99
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« on: Jun 18, 2017, 02:20PM »

I'm excited to announce that I'll have my first lesson for not only bass trombone, but trombone as a whole!  I started playing trombone in 6th grade and I'll be a senior in high school so I'm really looking forward for the experience and helpful advice!  The teacher is in Troy, Michigan and at Marshall music.  Will update more details later! :D
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Ethan Wadie
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« Reply #1 on: Jun 18, 2017, 02:55PM »

Play a short demonstration that will show exactly where you are in ability.  Give your new teacher a lot to figure out where to point you.  A good teacher will work from some prepared material and some sightreading to structure a teaching plan.

Be prepared for him to set you back a few exercises into stuff you think you know.  If you are lucky, you will discover there is a lot more to learn in that old stuff.

Ask for a good warmup; something that will not just get the blood flowing but maybe do some development work.  In my case it was the Remington Warmup Studies.

With a little luck he will carve a few minutes out of the end of the lesson to play a duet.  Learning to play with somebody else is a very important part of your development. 

Whatever he asks you to do for the next lesson, do it!!  If you don't progress you are wasting the teacher's and your time.

Hope it goes well.
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Bruce Guttman
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« Reply #2 on: Jun 18, 2017, 03:22PM »

I took trombone lessons later in life with a good professional trombone player. Bruce's comments about having to go back to some fairly basic things is right. Initially quite demoralising but *definitely* worth it in the medium to long term. Comparable to a good golf coach deconstructing and then reconstructing your swing.
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EWadie99
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« Reply #3 on: Jun 18, 2017, 04:55PM »

Play a short demonstration that will show exactly where you are in ability.  Give your new teacher a lot to figure out where to point you.  A good teacher will work from some prepared material and some sightreading to structure a teaching plan.

Be prepared for him to set you back a few exercises into stuff you think you know.  If you are lucky, you will discover there is a lot more to learn in that old stuff.

Ask for a good warmup; something that will not just get the blood flowing but maybe do some development work.  In my case it was the Remington Warmup Studies.

With a little luck he will carve a few minutes out of the end of the lesson to play a duet.  Learning to play with somebody else is a very important part of your development. 

Whatever he asks you to do for the next lesson, do it!!  If you don't progress you are wasting the teacher's and your time.

Hope it goes well.
Will do! Good!  I'll do anything that he/she says.  From equipment change, exercises, warm-up, etc.  I'm willing to do anything to help my playing and everything else that is recommended!  I'm really looking foward to this one! Good!
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Ethan Wadie
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« Reply #4 on: Jun 18, 2017, 06:23PM »

I started taking lessons in January of this year.  Scales, rhythmic studies, intervals, lip slurs, double and triple tonguing exercises, and of course supporting etudes.  In all keys and at a variety of tempos.  I am to continually strive for better pitch, more accurate timing, cleaner and better executed articulations, better breath control and breathing and more accurate/appropriate expression.

Unless you can play the basics right, there is not point in moving ahead.

It seems to be working well.
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« Reply #5 on: Jun 18, 2017, 09:55PM »

Take a recorder and record the lesson. (Ask for permission first.)



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EWadie99
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« Reply #6 on: Jun 19, 2017, 11:21AM »

Take a recorder and record the lesson. (Ask for permission first.)




I'll see if I can record the lesson and if I don't, I'll go into detail of what I've been told and been ask to do.  Again, I'm really excited and hope it goes well! :D
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Ethan Wadie
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EWadie99
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« Reply #7 on: Jun 20, 2017, 02:42PM »

A date has been confirmed!  It will be next Tuesday!
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Ethan Wadie
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« Reply #8 on: Jun 20, 2017, 04:25PM »

Take a recorder and record the lesson. (Ask for permission first.)





Dont do that, do it later when he knows you and you know him. And of course ask first.

What to do in the first lesson? Get friends.

Leif
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« Reply #9 on: Jun 20, 2017, 07:37PM »

Dont do that, do it later when he knows you and you know him. And of course ask first.

What to do in the first lesson? Get friends.

Leif

Leif,

I respectfully disagree.  Recording lessons and writing notes are marks of respect for the teacher.  Most of the teachers I've had made me play right from the very first lesson.  Having that and the other lesson recorded would have been a great help for "keeping me honest" so I'd know how much (or little) progress I'd made. Some teachers also play examples of how they want exercises to sound.  For a student who will practice between lessons, this can be a great help.
I think the key, though, is the asking.  And perhaps making sure that the teacher understands that the recording is to help the student make the most of the teacher's valuable time.

If, however, the student shows up at the next lesson and has obviously NOT listened to the advice and examples on the recording, MUCH better to have not recorded at all!

I DO agree about making friends.  Part of that, though, is setting the ground rules. Again, having it on tape can help avoid asking the teacher to repeat himself or herself.

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« Reply #10 on: Jun 21, 2017, 05:16AM »

Like many other young people here on TTF I recall that the poster does post on youtube frequently.

We don't now who the teacher is. I believe that most teachers would be hesitant to have anything recorded by a student that might end up on youtube in future.

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EWadie99
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« Reply #11 on: Jun 27, 2017, 02:14PM »

Yesterday, I've been informed the day before my lesson would take place, the instructor was on holiday.  This sums up my luck. :/  So now it will be rescheduled on July 11th, a week after 4th of July which is two weeks from today.  *sigh*
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Ethan Wadie
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« Reply #12 on: Jun 27, 2017, 02:36PM »

I wouldn't continue with an instructor that bailed for that reason the day before a lesson.  That sounds like one horrendously disorganized individual.  I predict only frustration on your part if you continue the relationship.
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« Reply #13 on: Jun 27, 2017, 03:25PM »

I looked up the location for your lesson and it appears that it is at a local music store.  My experience has been that those teachers may not alway be the best qualified (some also are very good, but that is the exception).  You are in the Detroit area, there must be a university/college or jr./community college with a trombone teacher within driving distance you can study with.  Start googling and calling and find a teacher that can help you be the player you want to be.
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« Reply #14 on: Jun 29, 2017, 01:00AM »

If you are going to have lessons, search out the teacher with the best reputation.... a good teacher will inspire you, a bad teacher will confuse and demoralise you. I can see you are growing in maturity and will really benefit from GOOD tuition.

Chris Stearn
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EWadie99
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« Reply #15 on: Jul 11, 2017, 02:04PM »

Well, today's the day!  I'll finally got my first lesson, I'll report back later to let you guys know how it all went and what my teacher says.  Really excited about this one! :D
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Ethan Wadie
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« Reply #16 on: Jul 12, 2017, 07:50AM »

In my lesson, we worked on alternate positions using the triggers, long tones, lip slurs and valve register exercises.  Next week, he'll bring a bass trombone book so we can use the exercises as warm-ups and do some Bordogni.  Overall, it was a very successful first lesson! :) Good!
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Ethan Wadie
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« Reply #17 on: Jul 12, 2017, 07:51PM »

If you are going to have lessons, search out the teacher with the best reputation.... a good teacher will inspire you, a bad teacher will confuse and demoralise you. I can see you are growing in maturity and will really benefit from GOOD tuition.

Chris Stearn

Or at least frustrate you...

Good luck with the teacher.  Don't be afraid to make a change if you don't believe you're making meaningful progress.

--Andy in OKC
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« Reply #18 on: Jul 12, 2017, 09:32PM »

In my lesson, we worked on alternate positions using the triggers, long tones, lip slurs and valve register exercises.  Next week, he'll bring a bass trombone book so we can use the exercises as warm-ups and do some Bordogni.  Overall, it was a very successful first lesson! :) Good!
He's happy with the basics then?  Your tone, intonation, articulation, embouchure, breath control, rhythm and knowledge of keys, scales and arpeggios are all good to go?   Cool! Good!

The rest should just fall into place with a little wood shedding.
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EWadie99
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« Reply #19 on: Jul 14, 2017, 04:18PM »

Also another thing, next week, my instructor will try to find a bass trombone to use so we can experiment with the double valve register.  He was using one of those Schilke trombones with an axial flow valve so we pretty much worked on the F-attachment positions.  I do have a dependent Bb/F/D bass so it will be interesting to see when I will use the F-attachment or use both valves at certain times in certain pieces.  Looking forward to the next lesson! Good!
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Ethan Wadie
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« Reply #20 on: Jul 16, 2017, 08:31AM »

EWadie, I have to agree with BillO.
I am probably a lot older than you and probably a little further in my progression as a Bass Trombonist. I am pretty much self taught, only having had a few lessons with a local amatuer trombone player who who taught at my senior school for the last year I was there. Prior to that I was taught by a clarinet player (for nearly 5 years).
However, a few years back I took a couple of lessons with the bass trombone of the Royal Philharmonic. A really great player named Roger Argente.
The time I spent with him he concentrated on basic technique. Things like posture and breathing. We talked a lot about how to play. How to practise. How to improve.
If there was one technical thing we looked at it was how my jaw should function when going in and out of the valve register, and improving consistency down there by being better prepared for those notes and phrases. On the whole, it was the time spent on basics that I have found the most valuable.
I have spoken since to some really good players and its surprising how many of them have similar stories about their teachers at music college. Basics basics basics.

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EWadie99
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« Reply #21 on: Jul 16, 2017, 11:52AM »

Hi Alex,
I've started playing bass trombone my Sophomore year of high school.  I'll be a Senior this coming year have been playing bass trombone for about two years as I type this.  I'm also for the most part self-taught and had my first lesson about a week ago.  I started to play bass trombone when my high school's jazz ensemble needed a bass bone player and I volunteered and I've been playing it ever since.  I started on a Benge 290 with a Bach 1G which my school provided before I bought my dependent Getzen at the second semester of my Sophomore year and also bought a Schilke 59 to go down a size.  I'm also currently in my school's top ensembles which are Wind Ensemble which I joined my Junior year and Jazz Ensemble since my Sophomore year both having the bass trombone spot in both ensembles.  I also like the fact that I'm not the only one that has been on this path.  I'm really looking forward for my journey in bass trombone and hope to achieve more along the way!

Ethan 
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Ethan Wadie
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« Reply #22 on: Jul 16, 2017, 01:38PM »

Ethan, I think you missed my point. If your teacher is blinding you with technical matters such as alternative positions using the triggers on the first time of meeting you, then I can only assume everyrhing else must be perfect Any time I have spent with a pro in a lesson it has always been about reinforcing basics and reinforcing good technique.
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« Reply #23 on: Jul 16, 2017, 03:17PM »

Ethan, I think you missed my point. If your teacher is blinding you with technical matters such as alternative positions using the triggers on the first time of meeting you, then I can only assume everyrhing else must be perfect Any time I have spent with a pro in a lesson it has always been about reinforcing basics and reinforcing good technique.

There are a fair number of successful teachers who lament the teaching of "primary positions" and recommend diving right into "where the note can be played" alongside tone production fundamentals.  Learning good sound producing fundamentals AWAY from good ol' first position may be a touch slower at first, but in the long run it can make for an even more solid base... taught by the right teacher.

I'd resist the urge to second guess Ethan's new teacher until things have settled in a bit...
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« Reply #24 on: Jul 17, 2017, 12:57AM »


I'd resist the urge to second guess Ethan's new teacher until things have settled in a bit...

Fair point.
It would also be fair  that in any first lesson with a teacher who is looking to become your regular teacher, he/she should cover as much ground as possible to see what they have to work with.
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EWadie99
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« Reply #25 on: Jul 18, 2017, 05:10PM »

Just came back from my second lesson!  I bought "Melodious Etudes for Trombone Book 1" and I'm currently studying Bordogni #2. Good!
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Ethan Wadie
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« Reply #26 on: Jul 18, 2017, 07:27PM »

Good luck.  The Bordogni/Rochut exercises are great for developing tone and style.  For bass trombone sometimes you can play it down an octave, but tenor clef down an octave often works better.

In case you think these are "one and done", Megan O'Malley (Jhereg) had to prepare #7 for an audition and she was just unemployed by the end of Ringling Brothers Circus.
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« Reply #27 on: Jul 18, 2017, 07:36PM »

Good luck.  The Bordogni/Rochut exercises are great for developing tone and style.  For bass trombone sometimes you can play it down an octave, but tenor clef down an octave often works better.

In case you think these are "one and done", Megan O'Malley (Jhereg) had to prepre #7 for an audition and she was just unemployed by the end of Ringling Brothers Circus.

Yup. Ive seen bordognis asked on several bass trombone audition lists. It seems to be more commonly asked on uni auditions but ive seen it on a couple of pro ones too. What is usually asked is "one bordogni of your choice at pitch and down one octave". I believe the point is mainly so the panel can hear you have a consistent sound quality across your range. The mistake I see a few people make, is that they choose a bordogni closer to the back of the book that is more "technically challenging" in an attempt to show that off, when really all the panel want to hear is a good sound quality in both registers. If I take an audition where this is asked, i usually pick one of the first 10 (usually no. 4). Those give me the best chance of showing my best sound without having to worry about fast technical passages. Save that for another area of the audition.
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