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The Trombone ForumTeaching & LearningBeginners and Returning Trombonists(Moderator: bhcordova) I'm Going To Have My First Trombone/Bass Trombone Lesson
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Alex
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« Reply #20 on: Jul 16, 2017, 08:31AM »

EWadie, I have to agree with BillO.
I am probably a lot older than you and probably a little further in my progression as a Bass Trombonist. I am pretty much self taught, only having had a few lessons with a local amatuer trombone player who who taught at my senior school for the last year I was there. Prior to that I was taught by a clarinet player (for nearly 5 years).
However, a few years back I took a couple of lessons with the bass trombone of the Royal Philharmonic. A really great player named Roger Argente.
The time I spent with him he concentrated on basic technique. Things like posture and breathing. We talked a lot about how to play. How to practise. How to improve.
If there was one technical thing we looked at it was how my jaw should function when going in and out of the valve register, and improving consistency down there by being better prepared for those notes and phrases. On the whole, it was the time spent on basics that I have found the most valuable.
I have spoken since to some really good players and its surprising how many of them have similar stories about their teachers at music college. Basics basics basics.

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EWadie99
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« Reply #21 on: Jul 16, 2017, 11:52AM »

Hi Alex,
I've started playing bass trombone my Sophomore year of high school.  I'll be a Senior this coming year have been playing bass trombone for about two years as I type this.  I'm also for the most part self-taught and had my first lesson about a week ago.  I started to play bass trombone when my high school's jazz ensemble needed a bass bone player and I volunteered and I've been playing it ever since.  I started on a Benge 290 with a Bach 1G which my school provided before I bought my dependent Getzen at the second semester of my Sophomore year and also bought a Schilke 59 to go down a size.  I'm also currently in my school's top ensembles which are Wind Ensemble which I joined my Junior year and Jazz Ensemble since my Sophomore year both having the bass trombone spot in both ensembles.  I also like the fact that I'm not the only one that has been on this path.  I'm really looking forward for my journey in bass trombone and hope to achieve more along the way!

Ethan 
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Ethan Wadie
Adlai E. Stevenson High School
Adlai E. Stevenson High School Titan Marching Band
Adlai E. Stevenson High School Jazz Ensemble
Adlai E. Stevenson High School Wind Ensemble
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« Reply #22 on: Jul 16, 2017, 01:38PM »

Ethan, I think you missed my point. If your teacher is blinding you with technical matters such as alternative positions using the triggers on the first time of meeting you, then I can only assume everyrhing else must be perfect Any time I have spent with a pro in a lesson it has always been about reinforcing basics and reinforcing good technique.
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boneagain
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« Reply #23 on: Jul 16, 2017, 03:17PM »

Ethan, I think you missed my point. If your teacher is blinding you with technical matters such as alternative positions using the triggers on the first time of meeting you, then I can only assume everyrhing else must be perfect Any time I have spent with a pro in a lesson it has always been about reinforcing basics and reinforcing good technique.

There are a fair number of successful teachers who lament the teaching of "primary positions" and recommend diving right into "where the note can be played" alongside tone production fundamentals.  Learning good sound producing fundamentals AWAY from good ol' first position may be a touch slower at first, but in the long run it can make for an even more solid base... taught by the right teacher.

I'd resist the urge to second guess Ethan's new teacher until things have settled in a bit...
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Alex
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« Reply #24 on: Jul 17, 2017, 12:57AM »


I'd resist the urge to second guess Ethan's new teacher until things have settled in a bit...

Fair point.
It would also be fair  that in any first lesson with a teacher who is looking to become your regular teacher, he/she should cover as much ground as possible to see what they have to work with.
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EWadie99
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« Reply #25 on: Jul 18, 2017, 05:10PM »

Just came back from my second lesson!  I bought "Melodious Etudes for Trombone Book 1" and I'm currently studying Bordogni #2. Good!
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Ethan Wadie
Adlai E. Stevenson High School
Adlai E. Stevenson High School Titan Marching Band
Adlai E. Stevenson High School Jazz Ensemble
Adlai E. Stevenson High School Wind Ensemble
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« Reply #26 on: Jul 18, 2017, 07:27PM »

Good luck.  The Bordogni/Rochut exercises are great for developing tone and style.  For bass trombone sometimes you can play it down an octave, but tenor clef down an octave often works better.

In case you think these are "one and done", Megan O'Malley (Jhereg) had to prepare #7 for an audition and she was just unemployed by the end of Ringling Brothers Circus.
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Bruce Guttman
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« Reply #27 on: Jul 18, 2017, 07:36PM »

Good luck.  The Bordogni/Rochut exercises are great for developing tone and style.  For bass trombone sometimes you can play it down an octave, but tenor clef down an octave often works better.

In case you think these are "one and done", Megan O'Malley (Jhereg) had to prepre #7 for an audition and she was just unemployed by the end of Ringling Brothers Circus.

Yup. Ive seen bordognis asked on several bass trombone audition lists. It seems to be more commonly asked on uni auditions but ive seen it on a couple of pro ones too. What is usually asked is "one bordogni of your choice at pitch and down one octave". I believe the point is mainly so the panel can hear you have a consistent sound quality across your range. The mistake I see a few people make, is that they choose a bordogni closer to the back of the book that is more "technically challenging" in an attempt to show that off, when really all the panel want to hear is a good sound quality in both registers. If I take an audition where this is asked, i usually pick one of the first 10 (usually no. 4). Those give me the best chance of showing my best sound without having to worry about fast technical passages. Save that for another area of the audition.
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