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The Trombone ForumTeaching & LearningPractice Room(Moderator: blast) Slide technique practice out of facetime?
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bigbassbone1

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« Reply #20 on: Jun 21, 2017, 01:18PM »

I am going to diagree strongly with those saying you cant improve something like slide technique away from the horn. That goes for almost any form of technique actually.... having said that, of course, if you never practice with the instrument you wont improve. Simple as that.

A practice technique I use and have heard from multiple sources who really know what they are talking about, Is to visualise a "perfect" execution of what you are practicing. Your brain is a powerful tool, and if you focus, you can mentally create a lot of sensations in your body as though you are actually practicing something. When you have a clear, mental image that is a perfect rendition of what you are practicing  (in this case slide technique) you have a great foundation with which to build your "actual" practice with your instrument. You have a clear "perfect" goal in mind, so when you actually play you should notice immediately when something you do physically doesn't match your perfect mental version and be able to adjust. I believe its an efficient way to practice and gets you achieveing your goal of practice much faster than simply playing something over and over, trying to notice what you are doing wrong each time, rather than comparing to a "perfect" version you have "already played".
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SilverBone
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« Reply #21 on: Jun 21, 2017, 03:34PM »

I learned valve fingerings by playing air baritone.

But slide technique is a different animal, I think.  Though in my 20+ years off the trombone I occasionally played air slide just to see if I remembered the positions.  There's a lot more than positions to slide technique, though.
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« Reply #22 on: Jun 21, 2017, 10:26PM »

I am going to diagree strongly with those saying you cant improve something like slide technique away from the horn. That goes for almost any form of technique actually.... having said that, of course, if you never practice with the instrument you wont improve. Simple as that.

A practice technique I use and have heard from multiple sources who really know what they are talking about, Is to visualise a "perfect" execution of what you are practicing. Your brain is a powerful tool, and if you focus, you can mentally create a lot of sensations in your body as though you are actually practicing something. When you have a clear, mental image that is a perfect rendition of what you are practicing  (in this case slide technique) you have a great foundation with which to build your "actual" practice with your instrument. You have a clear "perfect" goal in mind, so when you actually play you should notice immediately when something you do physically doesn't match your perfect mental version and be able to adjust. I believe its an efficient way to practice and gets you achieveing your goal of practice much faster than simply playing something over and over, trying to notice what you are doing wrong each time, rather than comparing to a "perfect" version you have "already played".

This makes sense to me. Good post  Good!

If the hand reacts while you are visualising performing a pattern or not may or may not help. I don't know if it adds to the result, but to me the micro-movements my hand is doing while I read the pattern (handling it as a kinetic pattern finding the best flow for regular or alternative positions) just happens.  I don't streach my arm as if I'm holding the trombone. The motion is just in the hand and I'm not holding the slide either. It is certainly more mental than physical. I have never reflected on this subject before, not until this thread came up.
I guess visualising "you can do it" is the big part, and that is what happens in the brain when you are imagening you can do it in a certain way. We know the psychological factors are there, always!

/Tom
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« Reply #23 on: Jun 22, 2017, 01:27AM »

Here's a slide position chart that I leave around the place in a NLP manner, for economical slide shifts when the time comes..

https://www.dropbox.com/s/84wod5hnyq21pbi/Slide%20Pos%20Chart%202016.pdf?dl=0

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« Reply #24 on: Jun 22, 2017, 03:18AM »

My teacher, the late Mr. Frank Crisafulli, was arguably was of those cosmic great teacher/player combinations. He taught me to practice with the slide "off the face" as follows. Hold the horn as you normally would -- except your lips are barely touching the mouthpiece. Do the slide motions for the passage. This can be done for just a couple of notes or an entire passage. Use the precise rhythm written but at slower tempo at first especially if it is a difficult passage. Do this both with and without articulations. When doing it with articulations, use air as well. Try to improve the coordination of the articulation and slide motion. Then do it on the horn ("on your face"). Go back and forth between on and off the face until the coordination and execution improves and it becomes muscle memory.

And the corollary practice method he taught is probably more important. Practice the passage on your face but only on one note. You can pick each note in the passage (and do them all one at a time). Ensure it is as good as you can make it (sound, rhythm, articulation, absolutely no hint of change/difficulty/tension in the air and your core abs/chest). If you can't play it well on one note, there's no way you can play it well as written. Go back and forth (on one note and as written). When you play it as written: *be sure it feels the same and it is as easy as when you practiced it one note.*
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urbie4
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« Reply #25 on: Jul 04, 2017, 06:29AM »

Is it possible to practice slide positions and technique without putting facetime? If so, how to do it?

Not really technique per se, but that's how I learned to play alto (or at least play in E-flat).  I'm sure most of us kind of have changes going around in our head most of the day -- so shortly after I got an alto, I decided hey, if I'm going to have this air trombone in my head all day, it might as well be an alto!  After a few weeks of doing that, I could play with almost the same facility as on tenor.  Granted, the closer slide positions required (and still require) daily practice on the horn -- but just for getting my head around playing in E-flat, it was more by practicing in my head than with the horn.
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