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Author Topic: New Rest Bar design for the Yamaha 456  (Read 922 times)
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Lawrie

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« on: Jun 25, 2017, 10:53PM »

Some of you may recall my folding rest bar design for the Yam 456 to enable it to fit in the case.

In practice I'm not really that happy with it and have evolved another design.  It is currently under trial with a buddy of mine and I hope to get some feedback at rehearsal tonight.

The design has a sliding restbar that locks into position so it won't rotate when in the playing position, BUT when slid back just 5mm it will move easily and allow you to rotate it 180 deg and slide a little further back so it will fit in the Yammie case.

The bar has a nut thread-locked to it and then a locknut is added for additional security.  The clamp has a hex hole broached into it for the nut to fit into to prevent bar rotation.  In addition, the forces applied to the bar when in use would naturally tighten the nut anyway.

At first I was concerned that I'd need to design some kind of anti-slide mechanism to prevent it accidentally moving backwards unexpectedly, but initial use has shown that this is not likely to happen.

Images here:
In the case - top view:


In the case - side view:


Playing position - top view:


Playing position - neck side 3/4 view:


Playing position - bell side 3/4 view:


In case - side view - half way through transition:


NOT in case - bell side 3/4 view - half way through transition:

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--=-- My credo - If something's worth doing, it's worth overdoing. - just ask my missus, she'll tell ya Grin --=--

You're only paranoid if you're wrong.
Lawrie

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« Reply #1 on: Jun 26, 2017, 05:40AM »

<snip>
It is currently under trial with a buddy of mine and I hope to get some feedback at rehearsal tonight.
<snip

Just back from rehearsal - my buddy is very pleased: Easy to put away and great support.
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--=-- My credo - If something's worth doing, it's worth overdoing. - just ask my missus, she'll tell ya Grin --=--

You're only paranoid if you're wrong.
crazytrombonist505
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« Reply #2 on: Jun 26, 2017, 01:17PM »

Very nice!  Good!
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jpwell
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« Reply #3 on: Jun 28, 2017, 08:28AM »

Is it bolt on or solder on
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Lawrie

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« Reply #4 on: Jun 28, 2017, 09:01AM »

Is it bolt on or solder on
Bolt on.  The clamp is in 2 pieces and has 2 cap head screws that hold it together around the brace - a 2.5mm Allen key is supplied.

The clamp is made of brass and will not slip if fitted correctly.  It is sized to be a very close fit to the brace and only needs to be tightened moderately.  It's actually very hard to get wrong.

As you can see from the pics I use cork for the rest cushion - I actually recycle Champagne bottle style corks for this as those bottles are opened without a corkscrew - this maintains the corks integrity and I don't end up with extraneous holes from the corkscrew.
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--=-- My credo - If something's worth doing, it's worth overdoing. - just ask my missus, she'll tell ya Grin --=--

You're only paranoid if you're wrong.
jpwell
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« Reply #5 on: Jun 28, 2017, 10:14PM »

don't see how it wouldnt just spin around
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Lawrie

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« Reply #6 on: Jun 29, 2017, 12:01AM »

don't see how it wouldnt just spin around

That's what this bit is about:
The bar has a nut thread-locked to it and then a locknut is added for additional security.  The clamp has a hex hole broached into it for the nut to fit into to prevent bar rotation.  In addition, the forces applied to the bar when in use would naturally tighten the nut anyway.
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--=-- My credo - If something's worth doing, it's worth overdoing. - just ask my missus, she'll tell ya Grin --=--

You're only paranoid if you're wrong.
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