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The Trombone ForumCreation and PerformanceMusical Miscellany(Moderators: JP, BGuttman) Is it okay to puff your cheeks when you play?
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timothy42b
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« Reply #40 on: Jul 05, 2017, 06:05AM »

Here's a little more discussion for Dave's page:

http://www.wilktone.com/?p=4183

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Tim Richardson
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« Reply #41 on: Jul 05, 2017, 06:11AM »

Here's a little more discussion for Dave's page:

http://www.wilktone.com/?p=4183


"It’s hard to argue that Rosolino is playing “wrong” based on how good it sounds." - Wilktone

It doesn't necessarily follow that his method is right for everyone, though.

...Geezer
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oslide

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« Reply #42 on: Jul 05, 2017, 07:17AM »

He was a trumpet player, correct, but if HE did it there must be something to it...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nRcVBsEAnbk
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« Reply #43 on: Jul 07, 2017, 03:46PM »

Really?  Hmmm.  People see things differently. 

Try at 30 sec and watch the muscles.  They're dancing all over the place. 


I know what you mean though. It does seem excessive, doesn't it. That's probably the danger for us amateurs - to watch someone play in the way they play on such a high level and then try to imitate it. There was a golfer many years ago named Miller Barber who had a very peculiar "flying elbow" swing and yet there he was raking in a ton of PGA money. I have to wonder how many amateur golfers tried to imitate his swing the following Monday during league play.

How much better off would be all be if we adhered strictly to what our instructor showed us how to do.

...Geezer
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growlerbox
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« Reply #44 on: Jul 07, 2017, 11:08PM »

Another data point: Alistair White playing with James Morrison https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kfr29jkDoXU.

Seems to keep the puff well away from the corners.  Sounds all right to me!
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« Reply #45 on: Jul 08, 2017, 02:46AM »

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nYrZ9YvVooM
If it sounds good it is ok to puff your cheeks when playing any brass intruments.
 
Actually sometimes the puffing can be a good way to find your corners.
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baileyman
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« Reply #46 on: Jul 08, 2017, 04:53PM »

Fooling around a bit with Frank style puffing, it seems there is a possibility that what he was doing was reducing his muscular effort to only those muscles that mattered.  I suspect if I allowed the relaxation required to have those little puffs form, then I would be using less effort and might last longer before fatigue.  If that's the case I can speculate the puffs could be the result of hours long gigs with lots of solo and backup.  Shutting down unnecessary muscles seems like a good thing to try. 

I'm just speculating, but interesting results happen in the practice room. 

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BillO
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« Reply #47 on: Jul 10, 2017, 09:51PM »

I puff a little for some of the lower notes.  It seem to improve the tone.  The higher I go the less I need to puff to get that 'fat' sound I like.

Whatever works for you, but be critical.   Recording yourself helps.
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Geezerhorn

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« Reply #48 on: Jul 11, 2017, 03:56AM »

Fooling around a bit with Frank style puffing, it seems there is a possibility that what he was doing was reducing his muscular effort to only those muscles that mattered.  I suspect if I allowed the relaxation required to have those little puffs form, then I would be using less effort and might last longer before fatigue.  If that's the case I can speculate the puffs could be the result of hours long gigs with lots of solo and backup.  Shutting down unnecessary muscles seems like a good thing to try. 

I'm just speculating, but interesting results happen in the practice room. 


It's an interesting concept. I thought some veteran drum & bugle corp guys would weigh in on this. I imagine they - at the time - knew every possible way to cheat fatigue!

...Geezer
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davdud101
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« Reply #49 on: Jul 25, 2017, 05:12PM »

I puff a little for some of the lower notes.  It seem to improve the tone.  The higher I go the less I need to puff to get that 'fat' sound I like.

Whatever works for you, but be critical.   Recording yourself helps.

same for me too, BIll... on ALL points  Idea!
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Radar

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« Reply #50 on: Aug 31, 2017, 01:21PM »

I have a tendency to puff my cheeks on Tuba, but don't seem to do it on other instruments.  I'm working on getting it out of my Tuba playing also.  It's not the most efficient use of your air.  There are always exceptions to every rule, and Dizzy and other puffers have used the puffed cheeks and it works for them, but I think if you look at the majority of professional players they don't puff out there cheeks.  By the way I am working with a brass instructor to help me break bad habits like my puffing, I highly recommend finding a good teacher.  I play my warm-up with a small mirror on my stand, and play particular attention to whether or not I'm puffing and it is working.
 
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