Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length

 
Advanced search

1086890 Posts in 71947 Topics- by 19229 Members - Latest Member: Alfred
Jump to:  
The Trombone ForumTeaching & LearningBeginners and Returning Trombonists(Moderator: bhcordova) 1st thing to do when getting a brand new trombone?
Pages: [1] 2  All   Go Down
Print
Author Topic: 1st thing to do when getting a brand new trombone?  (Read 1642 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
NWHarry
*
Offline Offline

Location:
Joined: Mar 6, 2017
Posts: 2

View Profile
« on: Jul 10, 2017, 08:37AM »

I will be receiving a brand new Yamaha YSL-891Z trombone tomorrow and wanted to know what I should do when opening the package? Of course, I will look for OBVIOUS damage, but should I also look for very small dents and scratches? I doubt any will be found with this quality instrument.
But more importantly, since I don't know if there is any residual oil/wax left over from the manufacturing process, should I carefully wash & clean it (in my bath tub), then reapply lubricant on the tuning slide and slide itself?
Logged
Matt K

*
*
Offline Offline

Location:
Joined: May 6, 2010
Posts: 7177

View Profile
« Reply #1 on: Jul 10, 2017, 08:42AM »

Yamaha horns actually come with a little booklet on 'first things to do' if I'm not mistaken as well as one on how to maintain it.  Inspect it and then lube up the slides and get playing  Good!
Logged

What's in a name? that which we call a tenor-bass posaune
By any other name would smell as sweet;
Geezerhorn

*
Offline Offline

Location: PA
Joined: Feb 9, 2012
Posts: 5557
"Lego My Trombone"


View Profile
« Reply #2 on: Jul 10, 2017, 08:44AM »

I will be receiving a brand new Yamaha YSL-891Z trombone tomorrow and wanted to know what I should do when opening the package? Of course, I will look for OBVIOUS damage, but should I also look for very small dents and scratches? I doubt any will be found with this quality instrument.
But more importantly, since I don't know if there is any residual oil/wax left over from the manufacturing process, should I carefully wash & clean it (in my bath tub), then reapply lubricant on the tuning slide and slide itself?

How can you go wrong by doing all the things you listed to do, as long as you are as careful as you indicated you would be!

The only other thing I like to do with a new horn, whether actually new or just new to me is to burnish the inside of the outers with a 1" (or so) strip of bath towel spindled around my cleaning rod, pumping (very carefully) until the tube warms up.

...Geezer
Logged
jackbird
*
Offline Offline

Location:
Joined: Sep 11, 2015
Posts: 40

View Profile
« Reply #3 on: Jul 10, 2017, 09:19AM »

The first thing is to put duct tape over the small end. Then extend the slide to 7th position and duct tape it in place. Electrical tape is ok in a pinch. Then fill it with milk. It will take about half a gallon, depending on what bore you have. Now leave it in the sun for a couple days. Then play a couple notes as high and loud as you can. You might want to practice on another horn first so you don't blow any clams in the milk. That will only make chowda, if you know what I mean. After that, the manufacturing oil won't be a worry.
Logged
BGuttman
Mad Chemist

*
*
Offline Offline

Location: Londonderry, NH, USA
Joined: Dec 12, 2000
Posts: 51133
"Almost Professional"


View Profile
« Reply #4 on: Jul 10, 2017, 09:22AM »

I've heard some very negative things about "milk treatment" and I've never done it myself.  If you choose to do the milk treatment, be warned.  It will provide a very welcoming environment for biologics to grow in.
Logged

Bruce Guttman
Solo Trombone, Hollis Town Band
Merrimack Valley Philharmonic Orch. President 2017-2018
jackbird
*
Offline Offline

Location:
Joined: Sep 11, 2015
Posts: 40

View Profile
« Reply #5 on: Jul 10, 2017, 09:35AM »

...and the second thing to do is to put  :) or  Evil after your sarcastic postss, or peoplew ill start calling you a troll. :/
Logged
timothy42b
*
Offline Offline

Location: Colonial Heights, Virginia, US
Joined: Dec 7, 2000
Posts: 12297

View Profile
« Reply #6 on: Jul 10, 2017, 09:55AM »

I've heard some very negative things about "milk treatment" and I've never done it myself.  If you choose to do the milk treatment, be warned.  It will provide a very welcoming environment for biologics to grow in.

It's a trumpet thing.  I've seen it recommended before.

Logged

Tim Richardson
Matt K

*
*
Offline Offline

Location:
Joined: May 6, 2010
Posts: 7177

View Profile
« Reply #7 on: Jul 10, 2017, 10:20AM »

I'd alwyas been told its a horn thing that moved its way into the trumpet world.  One of my techs indicated its real benefit is smoothing out burrs, which I'd be surprsied if a new Yamaha has any of!
Logged

What's in a name? that which we call a tenor-bass posaune
By any other name would smell as sweet;
BGuttman
Mad Chemist

*
*
Offline Offline

Location: Londonderry, NH, USA
Joined: Dec 12, 2000
Posts: 51133
"Almost Professional"


View Profile
« Reply #8 on: Jul 10, 2017, 10:45AM »

I will say, if you are removing the plastic from the factory, I'd swab out the inside of the outer slide first thing.  Even before I put lube on it.

Also, count on having to lube your slide every day or so for a while.  You need to build up a layer on the inside of the outer slide that will be a foundation for any further lube.  If they furnished a bottle of the "Yama-snot", use that.  It's great stuff.
Logged

Bruce Guttman
Solo Trombone, Hollis Town Band
Merrimack Valley Philharmonic Orch. President 2017-2018
GetzenBassPlayer

*
Offline Offline

Location: Seattle, Washington
Joined: Aug 21, 2002
Posts: 6277
"Learn as little as you have to, as well a"


View Profile
« Reply #9 on: Jul 11, 2017, 02:05AM »

1st thing I do I'd pay for it Evil
Logged

Pro level? Pro level!  You make it pro, you make it good You make it loved and play nice Then its a pro level horn
Leif

I can justify my position with a trombone in my hands and that's good enough for me
Beware wise men bearing equations  C. Stearn
sonicsilver
*
Offline Offline

Location:
Joined: Apr 11, 2016
Posts: 509

View Profile
« Reply #10 on: Jul 11, 2017, 02:40AM »

Who's got the patience for QC and cleaning when there's a shiny new horn lying there in silence?

Just stick it on your face and start playing.
Logged
billepstein

*
Offline Offline

Location: Smoky Mountains
Joined: Aug 20, 2006
Posts: 37

View Profile
« Reply #11 on: Jul 12, 2017, 05:42AM »

I've heard some very negative things about "milk treatment" and I've never done it myself.  If you choose to do the milk treatment, be warned.  It will provide a very welcoming environment for biologics to grow in.

...and you'll never be able to play fleischig passages well :D
Logged
conn88plyr
Keith Hilson
*
Offline Offline

Location:
Joined: May 2, 2009
Posts: 73

View Profile WWW
« Reply #12 on: Jul 12, 2017, 08:19AM »

Who's got the patience for QC and cleaning when there's a shiny new horn lying there in silence?

Just stick it on your face and start playing.

Agreed!  It's not a terrible idea idea to at least clean out the slide if not the whole horn after the first week or two to clear out any accumulated polishing compound, oils, etc; if there is a valve involved giving the bell section a bath might not be the worst idea at this time. 

However, for me the most important thing would be enjoying your new trombone!  One doesn't get a new horn every day and the excitement and inspiration that comes with it!
Logged

Keith Hilson
Trombone Shop Manager
Schmitt Music, Brooklyn Center MN

Conn 88HO, Bach 42BO, Martin Urbie Green, Kuhnl & Hoyer Slokar alto
greenbean
*
Offline Offline

Location: California
Joined: Dec 26, 2012
Posts: 1552
"Brass Kahuna"


View Profile
« Reply #13 on: Jul 12, 2017, 08:44AM »

Gee, I read this whole thread (including troll posts) and THEN re-read the first post.  You are buying a Yamaha.  You don't have to do anything.  Just refresh the slide with some Yamaha slide lube and start playing.  Excellent horn.  Have a blast.  Maybe give it a bath after a week or two... 
Logged

--Yamaha 620G bass w/ Shires HW bell
Radar

*
Offline Offline

Location: Rochester NY
Joined: Feb 23, 2012
Posts: 700

View Profile
« Reply #14 on: Aug 19, 2017, 07:23AM »

New Yamaha horns come with lube that is the same as what they used in the factory.  Lube the slide and start playing, then follow standard cleaning and maintenance practices that you would on any horn.  A new slide may be a little scratchy, it should play in over time, don't be tempted to do anything extreme to the slide to get rid of the scratchiness other than playing it for a while.  There are a lot of old wives tales about things to do with new horns, Milk really!!!  I have heard of filling horns with mineral oil, and letting it soak in to seal pores inside of the horn, which makes more sense to me than the milk treatment. 
Logged
watermailonman

*
Offline Offline

Location: Sweden
Joined: Aug 1, 2004
Posts: 1420
"Do your best and then do better"


View Profile WWW
« Reply #15 on: Aug 19, 2017, 08:57AM »

The first thing is to put duct tape over the small end. Then extend the slide to 7th position and duct tape it in place. Electrical tape is ok in a pinch. Then fill it with milk. It will take about half a gallon, depending on what bore you have. Now leave it in the sun for a couple days. Then play a couple notes as high and loud as you can. You might want to practice on another horn first so you don't blow any clams in the milk. That will only make chowda, if you know what I mean. After that, the manufacturing oil won't be a worry.

What???? Don't know

/Tom
Logged

Listen to my playing on soundcloud https://soundcloud.com/user-796193724
Visit my page at https://sites.google.com/site/brazzmusic/

Instruments: King 2b+, Kanstul 1570, Kanstul 1662. m-pieces: Bach 6 3/4, Hammond 12 ML, Hammond 20 BL
Torobone

*
Offline Offline

Location: Toronto area
Joined: Sep 7, 2009
Posts: 2171

View Profile WWW
« Reply #16 on: Aug 19, 2017, 11:08AM »

I will be receiving a brand new Yamaha YSL-891Z trombone tomorrow and wanted to know what I should do when opening the package? Of course, I will look for OBVIOUS damage, but should I also look for very small dents and scratches? I doubt any will be found with this quality instrument.
But more importantly, since I don't know if there is any residual oil/wax left over from the manufacturing process, should I carefully wash & clean it (in my bath tub), then reapply lubricant on the tuning slide and slide itself?

Welcome.  Hi One of my first posts was to ask about the care and feeding of my 891Z, new in 2009.

Applying your own lube straight away on tuning slides is a good idea, simply so you know how it was done. Three things (or so):

1. You'll want to clean your slide daily until you don't get black off on the cleaning cloth. This took about 3 weeks for my horn.

2. Slide lubing. I use 2 products: 1) the Yamaha cream that came with my horn, and 2) Yamaha slide oil (or lubricant, whatever is says on it. I put the smallest amount of the cream on each stocking, and then I use a little more slide lube as well. After the slide is broken in, I have to clean my slide about twice per week with the cleaning rod and then the lubing mentioned above.

3. Lead pipes. You have 2, the NY (as chosen by Wycliffe Gordon) and the LA (as chosen by Andy Martin). The LA might be good for playing into a mic in LA, but everyone else I  know settles on the NY as it plays better in a live setting.

Good luck and enjoy your 891Z. I still love playing mine as my main horn.
Logged

Martin Hubel
Yamaha 891Z & 830 Xeno bass (both played regularly) , '74 Bach 42B, Yamaha 322 bass
RMTrombone
*
Offline Offline

Location:
Joined: Dec 4, 2013
Posts: 79

View Profile
« Reply #17 on: Aug 19, 2017, 11:56AM »



1. You'll want to clean your slide daily until you don't get black off on the cleaning cloth. This took about 3 weeks for my horn.


In my opinion, your new horn will not play right until you get it perfectly clean.

My new King took about three intense cleanings to get the "manufacturing grime" off. Yamaha may differ.

My choice was to not put on slide lube until the slide was clean.

Ask the dealer to clean the horn. Also check that the water key is working and sealing perfectly. (Did it get bent in shipping?)

Bill Watrous claimed he cleaned the slide with a cheesecloth covered rod every time he put the horn back in the case.
Logged
Torobone

*
Offline Offline

Location: Toronto area
Joined: Sep 7, 2009
Posts: 2171

View Profile WWW
« Reply #18 on: Aug 19, 2017, 02:59PM »

In my opinion, your new horn will not play right until you get it perfectly clean.

My new King took about three intense cleanings to get the "manufacturing grime" off. Yamaha may differ.

My choice was to not put on slide lube until the slide was clean.

Ask the dealer to clean the horn. Also check that the water key is working and sealing perfectly. (Did it get bent in shipping?)

Bill Watrous claimed he cleaned the slide with a cheesecloth covered rod every time he put the horn back in the case.

There are 2 things in play here: "manufacturing grime" and seating the inner and outer slides.

Manufacturing grime can be any residue left after the horn is built. Poor build quality might result in grime in the horn, blobs of solder left in places or parts that come off. Over the first 2 years of my Bach's life, 2 solder joints came apart. I all of my Yamahas, no joints have failed.

What I was referring to was seating, or wearing / breaking in, new metal components. The pistons in engines are another example. The oil in new engines is typically changed after a brief period. For me, this period lasted for 3 weeks with daily cleaning.

As for Bill Watrous, there is an old video of him cleaning his slide. During that video, he claimed that using cheesecloth on a cleaning rod until the metal became warm was a way to remove dirt, small dents and imperfections. To me, removing dents seems unlikely, but every single trombonist I've met has their own way to clean their horn. Let's assume it works for them.

I use a cleaning rod wrapped in cheesecloth every time I clean my horn, but I only do this when the slide is not perfect or before playing somewhere important like a gig. My experience may be more relevant to the OP as we play the same model.

I'm not a fan of leaving the slide without lube at any time. I also would never run my car without oil. Your mileage may vary.
Logged

Martin Hubel
Yamaha 891Z & 830 Xeno bass (both played regularly) , '74 Bach 42B, Yamaha 322 bass
RMTrombone
*
Offline Offline

Location:
Joined: Dec 4, 2013
Posts: 79

View Profile
« Reply #19 on: Aug 19, 2017, 03:33PM »

Just to be clear; I did not play the slide until I had it cleaned and lubed. I was using Slide-O-Mix two part at the time, I find (as most do) that it does not work on a dirty slide.
Logged
Pages: [1] 2  All   Go Up
Print
Jump to: