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Author Topic: Gloves that came with trombone  (Read 672 times)
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stealthheartocarinaZ
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« on: Jul 11, 2017, 07:28PM »

So when I got my trombone back in January (it was pre-owned but never used), there was a pair of gloves that came with the case. The guy told me that they were cleaning gloves, but why would you need gloves to clean a trombone? Someone in band told me that they were marching gloves, but they really don't look or feel like it unless whomever bought them was really cheap. Do you guys happen to have a idea on what these were used for? I'm sure if I can add a picture, but I can describe them if need be.
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« Reply #1 on: Jul 11, 2017, 07:31PM »

Did you buy a cheap used chinese instrument off of ebay or amazon?  Those all come with the same either infant or giant sized (never a useable size) versions of the gloves.  They rip easily.  And they are 100% BAND DIRECTORS CHOICE TROMBONE BACH YAMAHA. 
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« Reply #2 on: Jul 11, 2017, 07:44PM »

Agree with Noahharry; these gloves always come with Chinese instruments and are one of the little idiosyncrasies of these horns, like nickel silver outer slide tubes regardless of the design of the rest of the trombone.  They have no real use beyond whatever you might use white gloves for otherwise...
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Keith Hilson
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« Reply #3 on: Jul 11, 2017, 11:27PM »

Chuck em, its because you have an instrument that was probably originally sold through eBay or some small shop that isn't really a music store.

I took a look at your profile and I'm guessing it's the allora? Go ahead and find a used Yamaha student model for about $100 or upgrade to something with decent credibility and an F attachment (not a requirement but allows you to get the most out of your instrument, for educational purposes)
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« Reply #4 on: Jul 12, 2017, 04:23AM »

The white gloves give me the impression that the factory is trying to make their horns appear to be of a higher quality than they actually are. It would be like serving center-cut bologna on a silver platter. It's still baloney.  :-0

...Geezer
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Matt K

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« Reply #5 on: Jul 12, 2017, 04:35AM »

If its a Chinese horn then everyone is correct, they aren't worth much of anything.  You might wear the gloves if you have a reaction to the horn perhaps, but allergies to the plating are not super common. 

That said, there are polishing cloths for instruments, although I don't see any for asle on the hickeys website which is the only place I've ever seen them for sale. Usually they're marked with the company logo though. If its just white gloves, they don't do much of anything!
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« Reply #6 on: Jul 12, 2017, 07:22AM »

White glove service.
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greenbean
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« Reply #7 on: Jul 12, 2017, 08:11AM »

I can sell you a good student instrument if you are interested.  Yamaha.  Cheap.
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BillO
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« Reply #8 on: Jul 12, 2017, 10:44AM »

... like nickel silver outer slide tubes regardless of the design of the rest of the trombone.

What's wrong with nickel silver outers?
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« Reply #9 on: Jul 12, 2017, 12:42PM »

So when I got my trombone back in January...........

Does that mean you sent yours back for repair?

  I use the white gloves for laying along the open case edges so that I can just set the horn down for breaktime.  One glove on one end and the other under the slide.

  I read where Allora was German made or engineered - doesn't matter but they are sorta cheap.  Mine was a Christmas present. Amazed
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« Reply #10 on: Jul 12, 2017, 12:49PM »

I'm pretty sure Allora is made in Markneukirchen.

The white gloves can be handy if you have a nickel plated instrument.  Keeps your hands from turning black.  A fellow musician had a St. Petersburg Tuba and he wore his gloves wheneve he played it.
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Bruce Guttman
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« Reply #11 on: Jul 13, 2017, 07:38AM »

Many years back I played quite often in ensembles at The Smithsonian Institution and we used white gloves to protect the historical instruments that we used --- "Over-The-Shoulder" brasses and ophicleides mainly.  I recall them also using a very specific type of wax to protect the finish of those irreplaceable horns. I suppose the white gloves in discussion are intended for the same purpose ?
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« Reply #12 on: Jul 13, 2017, 07:45AM »

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Never look at the conductor. You just encourage them.

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« Reply #13 on: Jul 13, 2017, 08:57AM »

Many years back I played quite often in ensembles at The Smithsonian Institution and we used white gloves to protect the historical instruments that we used

I direct a handbell ensemble, and it is tradition to wear gloves when ringing, supposedly to protect the brass.

However, gloves collect dirt at the same rate as your hands, and are washed less frequently.  It isn't really protective, but I go with the flow on this one. 
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Tim Richardson
stealthheartocarinaZ
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« Reply #14 on: Jul 22, 2017, 01:09PM »

Chuck em, its because you have an instrument that was probably originally sold through eBay or some small shop that isn't really a music store.

I took a look at your profile and I'm guessing it's the allora? Go ahead and find a used Yamaha student model for about $100 or upgrade to something with decent credibility and an F attachment (not a requirement but allows you to get the most out of your instrument, for educational purposes)

Thank for the information. Unfortunately, this is the best I can do right now. It's not horrible compared to the ones that the school has on hand - the slide moves smoothly and it plays in tune. Buying a better horn is definitely a requirement once I get into college, but for right now I just don't have the money to upgrade.

I know you guys are probably going to lecture me about bad quality, but this is the best gift that anyone has ever given me and the best we could do with the money we had. Trust me, the school horns suck. Before I was playing trombone I was really upset because I was having a lot of trouble finding an instrument I could play and have fun with. I do agree, I need a better trombone, but right now it's pretty good for where I am standing right now, and I'm fine with waiting for the money.  Good!

Also, I got this trombone on Craig's List. The owner's son had apparently bought it somewhere but never used it. I know a few people have been asking where I got it.

"White glove service." I'm dying XD
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