Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length

 
Advanced search

1073401 Posts in 71208 Topics- by 18871 Members - Latest Member: movelearn
Jump to:  
The Trombone ForumTeaching & LearningPractice Room(Moderator: blast) Is there anyone out there who tongues with the syllable "thu"?
Pages: 1 [2]  All   Go Down
Print
Author Topic: Is there anyone out there who tongues with the syllable "thu"?  (Read 1140 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
fsgazda

*
Offline Offline

Location: Dover, Delaware, USA
Joined: Jan 30, 2002
Posts: 867

View Profile WWW
« Reply #20 on: Jul 13, 2017, 06:41PM »

Honestly, it works for me and doesn't seem to be a detriment. I am actually incapable of tonguing fast with "da" or "ta". I'm not sure why though.

For me "thu" is a flatter and faster stroke and it's easier to keep the air flowing.
Logged

Associate Professor of Music, Delaware State University, Dover, DE.
harrison.t.reed
*
Online Online

Location: Colorado
Joined: Apr 5, 2007
Posts: 2343
"Spartan Brass Band!"


View Profile
« Reply #21 on: Jul 13, 2017, 07:20PM »

Post a vid so we can hear how it works!   Idea!
Logged

"My technique is as good as Initial D"
T-396A - Griego 1C
88HTCL - Griego 1C
36H - DE XT105, C+, D Alto Shank
3B/F Silversonic - Griego 1A ss
pBone (with Yellow bell for bright tone)
fsgazda

*
Offline Offline

Location: Dover, Delaware, USA
Joined: Jan 30, 2002
Posts: 867

View Profile WWW
« Reply #22 on: Jul 14, 2017, 10:29AM »

Quick vid that I took at the end of today's morning session.  Just a simple tonguing exercise using "thu".

https://youtu.be/NyKp0qxJdvs
Logged

Associate Professor of Music, Delaware State University, Dover, DE.
Andrew Meronek

*
Offline Offline

Location: Livonia, MI
Joined: Sep 30, 2001
Posts: 6818
"Justly Intoned"


View Profile
« Reply #23 on: Jul 14, 2017, 02:23PM »

Quick vid that I took at the end of today's morning session.  Just a simple tonguing exercise using "thu".

https://youtu.be/NyKp0qxJdvs

Youtube labelled that category "comedy"?  :/
Logged

"All musicians are subconsciously mathematicians."

- Thelonious Monk
harrison.t.reed
*
Online Online

Location: Colorado
Joined: Apr 5, 2007
Posts: 2343
"Spartan Brass Band!"


View Profile
« Reply #24 on: Jul 14, 2017, 05:30PM »

Sounds good to me. It all depends on the style of music but that is a very useable articulation.
Logged

"My technique is as good as Initial D"
T-396A - Griego 1C
88HTCL - Griego 1C
36H - DE XT105, C+, D Alto Shank
3B/F Silversonic - Griego 1A ss
pBone (with Yellow bell for bright tone)
watermailonman

*
Offline Offline

Location: Sweden
Joined: Aug 1, 2004
Posts: 1319
"Do your best and then do better"


View Profile WWW
« Reply #25 on: Jul 15, 2017, 06:48AM »

For some reason, this syllable works the best for me in getting a clear articulation without much motion. I was instructed to us "Ta", but that always resulted in a lot of jaw motion and created problems in double tonguing. Just out of curiousity, I'm asking to see if there is anyone else who does this too?

It is not possible to give advice if this is good or not without hearing you. Me personally think "thu" is very close to "tu" or "du" or even "lu". To me the difference is a "thu" is either between the teeth or just behind the teeth. If behind the teeth it could be done both dorsal and non dorsal ways. Does it sound good? If it sounds good on a recording it is another tool in the box for you.

The background of language makes it tricky to understand exactly what you are doing. Me for example, as I'm Swedish the English ta is the Swedish tå and the English tu is the swedish ta. Question is if there are English dialects here to consider too.

As to different toungings.

For single tounge I use both ta and da  -  with 1. tip of tounge right behind teeth, as well as 2. dorsal attacks with the tounge against the roots in the jaw.

I also use different kinds of "la" attacks 1. la as to remove the tounge when saying la. 2. la as using the tip of the tounge as a valve and move it side to side, against or behind the teeth. It sounds a bit like a valved instrument when I use that, but it is sometimes useful because I can do it pretty fast. I once asked if anyone else here used that but I think no one really understood. It's okey if you don't.

Then we have the double tounge and triple tounge and the doodle tounge and my own variant of fast single tounge that is ta-da-ta-da. I can't single tounge ta-ta very fast but ta-da works for sixteens at the speed of 126 and the ta and da sound the same so no one can tell.

I guess you do what you have to do

Record yourself and listen  Hi

/Tom
Logged

Listen to my playing on soundcloud https://soundcloud.com/user-796193724
Visit my page at https://sites.google.com/site/brazzmusic/

Instruments: King 2b+, Kanstul 1570, Kanstul 1662. m-pieces: Bach 6 3/4, Hammond 12 ML, Hammond 20 BL
harrison.t.reed
*
Online Online

Location: Colorado
Joined: Apr 5, 2007
Posts: 2343
"Spartan Brass Band!"


View Profile
« Reply #26 on: Jul 15, 2017, 07:05AM »

Tom he posted a video.
Logged

"My technique is as good as Initial D"
T-396A - Griego 1C
88HTCL - Griego 1C
36H - DE XT105, C+, D Alto Shank
3B/F Silversonic - Griego 1A ss
pBone (with Yellow bell for bright tone)
watermailonman

*
Offline Offline

Location: Sweden
Joined: Aug 1, 2004
Posts: 1319
"Do your best and then do better"


View Profile WWW
« Reply #27 on: Jul 15, 2017, 07:11AM »

Tom he posted a video.

Yes, but the one posting a video is a professor at a school not the original poster, anyhow I thought my answer could give some ideas. The idea to experiment to increase your toolbox. Try the tip your teacher gives you but never stop to experiment on your own too.

/Tom
Logged

Listen to my playing on soundcloud https://soundcloud.com/user-796193724
Visit my page at https://sites.google.com/site/brazzmusic/

Instruments: King 2b+, Kanstul 1570, Kanstul 1662. m-pieces: Bach 6 3/4, Hammond 12 ML, Hammond 20 BL
harrison.t.reed
*
Online Online

Location: Colorado
Joined: Apr 5, 2007
Posts: 2343
"Spartan Brass Band!"


View Profile
« Reply #28 on: Jul 15, 2017, 07:44AM »

Haha whoops!
Logged

"My technique is as good as Initial D"
T-396A - Griego 1C
88HTCL - Griego 1C
36H - DE XT105, C+, D Alto Shank
3B/F Silversonic - Griego 1A ss
pBone (with Yellow bell for bright tone)
Georgilocks
*
Offline Offline

Location:
Joined: Jun 5, 2017
Posts: 25

View Profile
« Reply #29 on: Jul 15, 2017, 09:12AM »

For me "thu" is a flatter and faster stroke and it's easier to keep the air flowing.

Same for me. Sadly, I only figured it out late my sophomore year in high school.
Logged
savio

*
Offline Offline

Location: Norway
Joined: Aug 10, 2006
Posts: 5032

View Profile WWW
« Reply #30 on: Jul 17, 2017, 12:41PM »

For some reason, this syllable works the best for me in getting a clear articulation without much motion. I was instructed to us "Ta", but that always resulted in a lot of jaw motion and created problems in double tonguing. Just out of curiousity, I'm asking to see if there is anyone else who does this too?

I dont know but maybe some do. It isn't easy to answer this because there is so many different kind of articulations needed to play even a simple piece of music. I'm sorry I always use the term simple music because it doesn't really exists. What do exists is music with different character. It varies a lot even inside the same piece.

I'm not sure exactly what I do my self, but I know I use different "things" to achieve different results depending on the character of the music.  I wouldn't think so much about it but let the music steer the tongue. If it doesn't work you might need a lesson with a teacher.

Nothing wrong with thu if it works for you?

Leif

Leif
Logged

Bass Trombone - Conn, Holton
Pages: 1 [2]  All   Go Up
Print
Jump to: