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The Trombone ForumTeaching & LearningPractice Room(Moderator: blast) Learning and Practicing Sulek - "Sonata 'Vox Gabrieli' "
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Krazzikk

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« on: Jul 12, 2017, 08:06AM »

Hey guys, I just got this piece in the mail yesterday and I'm thinking about performing it at Solo and Ensemble next February. I'm looking for some advice on what I should be thinking when I look at this piece, and some specific advice on how to practice and perform this piece.

Also what kinds of things should I be thinking about performance-wise and can I best utilize the practice time I have with the pianist(or where will the trouble spots be). I have a real beast of a pianist(calling them an accompanist almost feels wrong) in mind who I think would be up to play this with me so hopefully that wont be a problem.

In short I'd love to hear any and all information and advice you have regarding this piece (or general principles). I saw one post about this piece from 2006 but it was limited and just had some information about the history and general information about it.

Thanks for everything! :)
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Ellrod

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« Reply #1 on: Jul 12, 2017, 08:52AM »

Youtube.
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djdekok

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« Reply #2 on: Jul 12, 2017, 08:57AM »

That would be an ambitious piece for Solo and Ensemble.
Also, as a single-movement work, meant to be performed in its entirety, you may wish to inquire of your band director if there is a time limit for solo performances at that festival/contest.
Hope you have a 12-fingered accompanist!  :D
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Daniel De Kok
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« Reply #3 on: Jul 12, 2017, 10:04AM »

Listen a ton.  You will definitely develop a good rhythmic ability especially triplet wise.  But listening is the best, if you can hear it you can play it.  And its probably one of the only pieces I think playing with a recording is warranted because of some of the weird rhythms.  Its a beautiful piece so find the beauty and also find the harshness. 
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Trombinders

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« Reply #4 on: Jul 12, 2017, 11:01AM »

Study the piano score while listening, helped me a lot!  :)
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harrison.t.reed
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« Reply #5 on: Jul 12, 2017, 12:36PM »

The piano part is far more difficult than the trombone part, which is relatively easy. It's a piece to show off how good someone is as a piano accompanist disguised as a trombone feature, so make sure you have a professional level piano accompanist.

There is a digital music program that has this piece and it follows you if you are miked. I recommend using it but I forget what it's called. It's better to use it with the follow feature turned off.

The real challenge is playing in time with your pianist. At UMass, the pianist wouldn't play it unless tge student could play the solo in time with a met.
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"My technique is as good as Initial D"
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Krazzikk

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« Reply #6 on: Jul 13, 2017, 10:12PM »

The piece is well within the time requirements of the festival.

I found an accompanist who seems well qualified but is asking $150 to learn the piece and a 30 minute rehearsal at my school(additional rehearsals at $75/hour). Despite the difficulty of the part I'm not sure I can't justify spending that much for him to learn the part. I generally thought accompanists didn't charge for learning the part.
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trombonemetal

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« Reply #7 on: Jul 14, 2017, 06:04AM »

The piece is well within the time requirements of the festival.

I found an accompanist who seems well qualified but is asking $150 to learn the piece and a 30 minute rehearsal at my school(additional rehearsals at $75/hour). Despite the difficulty of the part I'm not sure I can't justify spending that much for him to learn the part. I generally thought accompanists didn't charge for learning the part.

They will when it's something that hard. Sulek, Creston, Tomasi, etc.
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Kris Danielsen
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harrison.t.reed
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« Reply #8 on: Jul 14, 2017, 06:28AM »

30 minutes is probably not enough time to rehearse.
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"My technique is as good as Initial D"
T-396A - Griego 1C
88HTCL - Griego 1C
36H - DE XT105, C+, D Alto Shank
3B/F Silversonic - Griego 1A ss
pBone (with Yellow bell for bright tone)
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« Reply #9 on: Jul 14, 2017, 11:52AM »

In a piece of this difficulty, it is imperative that you study the score and mark certain spots in the trombone part so that you have landmarks. The piece is highly tied into the emotiona. look at what was going on in eastern Europe (former Yugoslavia in particular) and you will hear a musical example of what was going on.

Also this sonata is true chamber music with each being showcased. It reminds somewhat
of the Hindemith trombone sonata

 I heard Per Brevig give the premier in the 1970's at the International trombone Workshop in Nashville. His performance was astounding in bringing out the emotions of the sonata.

I have had two students perform this solo on their senior recitals. You will need more than 1/2 hour to make sure you are rock solid hearing each other.

This spring I heard John Ilka,  principal of the North Carolina Symphony and trombone professor at University of North Carolina School of the Arts, perform the Sulek on an undergraduate's collaborative senior piano recital. She had played it for one of my students senior recital a few years ago.She did a masterful job both times. Mr. Ilka was no slouch either. He had a good grasp of the emotional qualities. Technic-wise they both made the piece seem easy.
 
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harrison.t.reed
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« Reply #10 on: Jul 14, 2017, 01:14PM »

It'd be less expensive to use Smart Music. And it'll follow you to a T.
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"My technique is as good as Initial D"
T-396A - Griego 1C
88HTCL - Griego 1C
36H - DE XT105, C+, D Alto Shank
3B/F Silversonic - Griego 1A ss
pBone (with Yellow bell for bright tone)
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