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Author Topic: Stripping stubborn King lacquer  (Read 887 times)
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bonesmarsh
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« on: Jul 15, 2017, 07:29AM »

I have a vintage 1970s all yellow lacquered King 606 I wanted to strip the lacquer from. Three hours of Polystrippa --and one quart/litre--didn't remove even a speck of it.

Another 2 hour application-- and a full can-- of automotive paint stripper didn't touch it.

Finally I used Easy-Off Heavy Duty Oven Cleaner and it ate the lacquer effortlessly in less than 10 minutes. Spray on, wipe off.

Easy-Off should also work on that old King orange lacquer that is stubborn.

For the record the listed ingredients of epoxy remover is the same ingredients listed on the can of polystrippa type stuff. Epoxy remover had also been suggested online, as an answer.
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« Reply #1 on: Jul 28, 2017, 06:36AM »

Take it to a tech. Have him dip it and buff it. I had a Conn 6H stripped and buffed. I knew with that Lustre-Conn finish I would be in for a fight. He charged me $40, and it was finished in a day.

Worth the $$$

Jerry Walker
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« Reply #2 on: Jul 28, 2017, 06:38AM »

I had great luck with CitriStrip on a late 80's 3B. Lacquer was crinkled in about three hours, and wiped right off. That King orange stuff is like iron. I don't think CitriStrip would have touched it.

Jerry Walker
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« Reply #3 on: Jul 28, 2017, 06:58AM »

I tried CitriStrip on the orange stuff once.  Nothing.
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« Reply #4 on: Jul 28, 2017, 07:02AM »

I tried CitriStrip on the orange stuff once.  Nothing.

I have a Conn Director I used CitriStrip on. After four coats, it only took some lacquer off.

Looks like it has leprosy............

Yeah, that LustreConn is tough stuff.

Jerry Walker
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« Reply #5 on: Aug 04, 2017, 05:47PM »

I recently picked up a 1955 2B with about 1/3 of the lacquer gone.  Used easy-off, followed by never-dull and it's all shiny now.  The finish still shows the color difference between what used to be lacquer and what used to be not, but it's better than it was.
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LeoInFL
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« Reply #6 on: Aug 06, 2017, 04:29AM »

No offense to those who've had spotty results with Citristrip, but every horn I've used it on (dozens of different makes & models that includes Kings, Conns, Bachs, etc) the lacquer has always come completely off.  It may take 2 coats because I use a brush and may miss a spot or two after the 1st coat, but the stuff has done its job every single time.

I remember in my first attempts with Citristrip I would get 70-80% of the lacquer removed. I learned that even though at times I wouldn't get the results from an overnight application, it's not about the duration but the temperature.  The stuff works best when the air temp is warm (~85 deg F or hotter). 4-5 hours in my un-conditioned enclosed porch is what it usually takes me. The lacquer then basically sloughs off the horn in sheets when I rinse the Citristrip off with water.

Please keep in mind that once the lacquer is removed it will require a polishing. I've always had great results with Wright's Brass Polish.
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« Reply #7 on: Aug 06, 2017, 05:04AM »

No offense to those who've had spotty results with Citristrip, but every horn I've used it on (dozens of different makes & models that includes Kings, Conns, Bachs, etc) the lacquer has always come completely off.  It may take 2 coats because I use a brush and may miss a spot or two after the 1st coat, but the stuff has done its job every single time.

I remember in my first attempts with Citristrip I would get 70-80% of the lacquer removed. I learned that even though at times I wouldn't get the results from an overnight application, it's not about the duration but the temperature.  The stuff works best when the air temp is warm (~85 deg F or hotter). 4-5 hours in my un-conditioned enclosed porch is what it usually takes me. The lacquer then basically sloughs off the horn in sheets when I rinse the Citristrip off with water.

Please keep in mind that once the lacquer is removed it will require a polishing. I've always had great results with Wright's Brass Polish.

Maybe that is why I never had much luck with it in my basement!

...Geezer
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harrison.t.reed
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« Reply #8 on: Aug 06, 2017, 09:00AM »

Related question:

My 3B silversonic from 1970 is, I believe, laquered. Does anyone know if the laquer is also covering the gold wash on the inside of the bell as well?
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« Reply #9 on: Aug 06, 2017, 10:50AM »


I remember in my first attempts with Citristrip I would get 70-80% of the lacquer removed. I learned that even though at times I wouldn't get the results from an overnight application, it's not about the duration but the temperature.  The stuff works best when the air temp is warm (~85 deg F or hotter). 4-5 hours in my un-conditioned enclosed porch is what it usually takes me. The lacquer then basically sloughs off the horn in sheets when I rinse the Citristrip off with water.

I stripped the remaining lacquer off of an Olds P-22 using Klean airline grade stripper. The Home Depot guy walked me through it. High grade gloves, mask (itís corrosive), hot weather outside. No confined spaces, and apply, then remove after 12 minutes. Iíve used citrustrip and easyoff before, but I donít like leaving that stuff on for extended periods unattended.
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