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Author Topic: AR Resonance Mouthpieces  (Read 9714 times)
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lmalewic
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« on: Jul 16, 2017, 05:12PM »

Hello fellow trombonists,
I recently began working with Antonio Rapacciuolo of AR Mouthpieces and I am excited to announce that we have come out with something special for small-bore trombones. Antonio does have a full range of classical, and bass trombone mouthpieces also that are fantastic. If you would like more information on the pieces check out www.arresonance.com, and  https://www.facebook.com/arresonancesrl/. There are already 40-50 of them floating around the midwest for trumpet and now the same is happening for trombones. Antonio has a very unique two-piece mouthpiece system which allows you to tailor the piece to play the way you are used to rather than having to adjust to the blow of the piece. From my few weeks of playing on my piece I have noticed improvements in intonation, articulation and sound that I was not getting before. If you would like more information please send me an email, I do not get to check this forum too often. Please email me at     

l m a l e w i c   AT
g m a i l   DOT
c o m   

Here are some pictures.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/skl3eoynanbgm58/_DSC0023.jpg?dl=0

https://www.dropbox.com/s/gft9g9r396ia5fh/_DSC0016.jpg?dl=0

https://www.dropbox.com/s/obtmp1coy3g81dc/_DSC0008.jpg?dl=0
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« Reply #1 on: Jul 17, 2017, 03:07PM »

They definitely look the shiznit, and appear to be priced accordingly.  I guess the competition with Monette extends beyond the name.

The website doesn't yet have too many details regarding the trombone mouthpieces; what sort of sizes are being offered in the small bore range?
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« Reply #2 on: Jul 18, 2017, 08:05AM »

As far as sizes we are currently making a full range of small and large shank pieces. Here are the various rim sizes available for each....

Small shank:
26.0mm
25.7mm
25.4mm
25.1mm
24.8mm
24.5mm

Symphonic:
XL   27.2mm
VL   26.8mm
L   26.4mm
ML   26.0mm
M   25.6mm
MS   25.2mm
S   24.8mm

Bass Trombone:
BL   28.4mm
BM   28.0mm
BS   27.6mm

Get in touch with Antonio Rapacciuolo (via facebook) or myself via email (check original post) if you have any specific questions.
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« Reply #3 on: Jul 19, 2017, 07:11AM »

which cup deep, throat and backbore size are avaiable for the small shank version?
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« Reply #4 on: Jul 19, 2017, 09:31AM »

All of the small shank pieces have the same cup which is a C cup but not too shallow, and slightly V-Shaped. The throat is 6mm. We will be trying out different throat sizes eventually but for now there is no need for it. I've currently had 4 guys in Chicago come out to my place and they all left with a mouthpiece so the design is working great. There are 5 different backbores that we narrowed down from 9. You would need to try 3 of them to get a sense of which one fits your playing the best but we can probably do a good estimate by talking to you.

If you have more questions please email me at  L M A L E W I C at G M A I L dot C O M
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« Reply #5 on: Aug 24, 2017, 11:21AM »

Hey Forum,

I wanted to offer a review of the AR mouthpiece I just purchased from Luke. He mailed it to me two weeks ago with three different backbones (shanks) to try. I was previously using a hammond 13M since 2010. Another great mouthpiece.

My cup and rim size are similar to the Bach 6.5 size. This mouthpiece gave me a lot more core in the sound. Everything felt more stable and consistent. I tend to play vintage horns or tinker with parts because I like unique characteristics in my horns, but was looking for a component that could give me a uniformity in sound and an ease of playing across all registers without adjusting my face too much, and this piece has done it.

It also isn't as unforgiving as a Monette piece is...I enjoyed a Prana piece briefly but in live situations where I was pushing and playing incredibly loud it would back up on me and punish me for playing it differently than the "Dave Monette approach". This piece encourages good habits without punishing you for bad ones. It feels comfortable on the lips and has a nice weight to it. Heavier than my old Hammond but I like the stability that provides.

Luke also sent me three different screw on backbore shanks to try. Labeled 40, 43, and 46. They definitely make a difference in how the overtones sound--40 makes them sound closer together and very punchy, and 46 the overtones are spread out and broaden up the sound, 43 was right in the middle. There are also different resistances levels. Mine is one of the most open.

It may sound confusing but Luke is a pro trombonist with a lot of knowledge of musical situations and gear, so if you describe which horns you play on, which size and type mouthpiece you currently play, and the styles of music you want to use this piece on, he will steer you in the right direction.

Out of the backbores he sent I picked the 46--I like a broader tone especially on my .500 horns since I play pretty loud and punchy already.

The mouthpiece is also satin silver and looks beautiful! For the first time ever on a show, an audience member pointed to me and yelled "I want your mouthpiece!!" Haha. So if you're looking for a statement piece this can be it.

I'm hoping to try the Symphonic pieces at some point since I feel these mouthpieces can provide the attributes Symphonic players strive for in their approach.

Feel free to ask me any other questions I'll keep you posted!

-Ray
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« Reply #6 on: Sep 16, 2017, 12:45PM »

=====

I bought one from Luke today. In my 53 years as a trombonist it is the first mouthpiece that I have ever played that jumped out and grabbed me. For me, mouthpieces have always been a compromise. Compromise is not a word I would use to describe this AR Resonance piece.

It makes me sound like a better version of me. Wow. Mine is the small shank standard weight 24.8 mm, 6mm throat, 43 backbore, and a 10.5 shank. The shank number refers to how thin or thick the shank is. The 10.5 is quite thin, though there is a thinner one that Luke decided I should not even try because it wouldn't make a difference. I agreed, because it was so thin that you'd have to be extremely careful when inserting and removing the piece.

Anyway, this hep Italian cat that goes by the name of Antonio Rapacciuolo knows what he's doing! Ya dig?

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« Reply #7 on: Sep 16, 2017, 01:24PM »

OK.I give up. How do I get ahold of one in NYC? Anybody? Do they ship on approval?

S.
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« Reply #8 on: Sep 16, 2017, 01:33PM »

Sam, I  have one. I'll text you.
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« Reply #9 on: Oct 18, 2017, 07:15AM »

I purchased one of these about two weeks ago, a 25.1/60 with a 60/43/10.5 backbore.  Luke sent me out a few to try, four tops and two backbores.  The tops had inner rim diameters of 24.8mm, 25.1mm, 25.4mm, and 25.7mm.  The other backbore had a slightly longer throat (which I assume is cylindrical section) named a 60/40/10.5.

I gravitated toward the 25.1 and 24.8 tops.  My lips touch the sides/bottom of the 25.4 and 25.7, which didn't work too well for me.  I have a Bach Corp. 11C with a 6 1/2 rim threaded on and I don't bottom out on that one.  Your mileage may vary (They're making me up a 25.4 with a C+ cup now).  My lips tend to protrude a bit farther into the cup on larger rim sizes. 

Overall impression: this is a very stable mouthpiece with punch and power.  Bright, crisp sound.  In recordings I'm surprised at how much cleaner this mouthpiece sounds than most others I'm using.  I'm using it as a lead/commercial and Dixieland piece.  It feels a lot like a Greg Black 11C that I have, but punchier and more flexible.  I can move easier between low and high registers.  The rim profile reminds me of a Greg Black Bonilla model.  It works best for me on a .500 and smaller horn.  I've used it on my dual bore .500/.508 but that leaves me wanting a little more room to fatten the tone in middle and low registers.  Again, YMMV.  (I'm looking forward to trying out a 25.4 with C+ cup on this horn.) 

While I have dozens (hundreds?) of mouthpieces at home, this is on the short list of ones that I use regularly.  As a dedicated lead piece this fits the bill with the sound of a small mouthpiece that links with trumpets (11C/12C) while giving me a little more room to move around into the middle and low register without compromising the sound on top.  It was a close call, but I opted for the 25.1 over the 24.8 for that reason.  I'd definitely look at the 24.8 as a killer 11C mouthpiece with even more support up top.  I might pick one up later to have as an option. 

Luke was very easy to work with, I would put it on a short list of things to try if you are looking for a lead piece.

Ben
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« Reply #10 on: Oct 18, 2017, 09:17AM »

I purchased one of these about two weeks ago, a 25.1/60 with a 60/43/10.5 backbore.  Luke sent me out a few to try, four tops and two backbores.  The tops had inner rim diameters of 24.8mm, 25.1mm, 25.4mm, and 25.7mm.  The other backbore had a slightly longer throat (which I assume is cylindrical section) named a 60/40/10.5.

I gravitated toward the 25.1 and 24.8 tops.  My lips touch the sides/bottom of the 25.4 and 25.7, which didn't work too well for me.  I have a Bach Corp. 11C with a 6 1/2 rim threaded on and I don't bottom out on that one.  Your mileage may vary (They're making me up a 25.4 with a C+ cup now).  My lips tend to protrude a bit farther into the cup on larger rim sizes. 

Overall impression: this is a very stable mouthpiece with punch and power.  Bright, crisp sound.  In recordings I'm surprised at how much cleaner this mouthpiece sounds than most others I'm using.  I'm using it as a lead/commercial and Dixieland piece.  It feels a lot like a Greg Black 11C that I have, but punchier and more flexible.  I can move easier between low and high registers.  The rim profile reminds me of a Greg Black Bonilla model.  It works best for me on a .500 and smaller horn.  I've used it on my dual bore .500/.508 but that leaves me wanting a little more room to fatten the tone in middle and low registers.  Again, YMMV.  (I'm looking forward to trying out a 25.4 with C+ cup on this horn.) 

While I have dozens (hundreds?) of mouthpieces at home, this is on the short list of ones that I use regularly.  As a dedicated lead piece this fits the bill with the sound of a small mouthpiece that links with trumpets (11C/12C) while giving me a little more room to move around into the middle and low register without compromising the sound on top.  It was a close call, but I opted for the 25.1 over the 24.8 for that reason.  I'd definitely look at the 24.8 as a killer 11C mouthpiece with even more support up top.  I might pick one up later to have as an option. 

Luke was very easy to work with, I would put it on a short list of things to try if you are looking for a lead piece.

Ben

Ben...

I just got one in the mail. (Not familiar w/the nomenclature yet...2540 60 m'pce and I gravitated to the more open of two shanks ...60 43 10 5, whatever that means.) I only spent about 10 minutes on it so far...I don't want to confuse my chops too much before the Kyle Saulnier concert in Boston Sunday. (I'm playing the lead book and...as you know...it's a bear!!!) However, I succumbed early this morning after a good warm up. On first blow, I agree with everything that you said. The rim feels a little larger and "thinner"...maybe just more rounded...than a 6.5, the cup is a little shallower and more "cuppy" than the ones on my good Mt. Vernon 6.5A and the Minick I got from you (They're actually quite similar cups, those two m/pces.) and...surprisingly...the throat looks exactly like a 6.5AL and the backbore and taper match my 6.5A almost exactly. I say "surprisingly" because it doesn't play or sound anything like a 6.5-ish piece. A very even blow right on up through the 8th partial to the 12th. Dunno about it timbrally yet...gotta take into an ensemble in a good room to be sure...but it seems to be a bit brighter than my Minick on the .500 horn. Less room to color...loud or soft, it sounds much the same. Dunno about forceful attacks yet, either. We'll see.

But initial reaction?

A damned good design.

Later...

S.

P.S. Luke? Ben? Whomever? Where can I find a chart regarding the available sizes of cups, rims and shanks? What do the numbers mean?
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« Reply #11 on: Oct 20, 2017, 08:22AM »

Hey Forum,

I wanted to offer a review of the AR mouthpiece I just purchased from Luke. He mailed it to me two weeks ago with three different backbones (shanks) to try. I was previously using a hammond 13M since 2010. Another great mouthpiece.

My cup and rim size are similar to the Bach 6.5 size. This mouthpiece gave me a lot more core in the sound. Everything felt more stable and consistent. I tend to play vintage horns or tinker with parts because I like unique characteristics in my horns, but was looking for a component that could give me a uniformity in sound and an ease of playing across all registers without adjusting my face too much, and this piece has done it.

It also isn't as unforgiving as a Monette piece is...I enjoyed a Prana piece briefly but in live situations where I was pushing and playing incredibly loud it would back up on me and punish me for playing it differently than the "Dave Monette approach". This piece encourages good habits without punishing you for bad ones. It feels comfortable on the lips and has a nice weight to it. Heavier than my old Hammond but I like the stability that provides.

Luke also sent me three different screw on backbore shanks to try. Labeled 40, 43, and 46. They definitely make a difference in how the overtones sound--40 makes them sound closer together and very punchy, and 46 the overtones are spread out and broaden up the sound, 43 was right in the middle. There are also different resistances levels. Mine is one of the most open.

It may sound confusing but Luke is a pro trombonist with a lot of knowledge of musical situations and gear, so if you describe which horns you play on, which size and type mouthpiece you currently play, and the styles of music you want to use this piece on, he will steer you in the right direction.

Out of the backbores he sent I picked the 46--I like a broader tone especially on my .500 horns since I play pretty loud and punchy already.

The mouthpiece is also satin silver and looks beautiful! For the first time ever on a show, an audience member pointed to me and yelled "I want your mouthpiece!!" Haha. So if you're looking for a statement piece this can be it.

I'm hoping to try the Symphonic pieces at some point since I feel these mouthpieces can provide the attributes Symphonic players strive for in their approach.

Feel free to ask me any other questions I'll keep you posted!

-Ray

It's nice to hear a comparison to Monette here, since I like their mouthpieces.  Maybe this would work even better for me.  Certainly something to consider.
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« Reply #12 on: Oct 21, 2017, 07:03AM »

I purchased one of these about two weeks ago, a 25.1/60 with a 60/43/10.5 backbore.  Luke sent me out a few to try, four tops and two backbores.  The tops had inner rim diameters of 24.8mm, 25.1mm, 25.4mm, and 25.7mm.  The other backbore had a slightly longer throat (which I assume is cylindrical section) named a 60/40/10.5.

I gravitated toward the 25.1 and 24.8 tops.  My lips touch the sides/bottom of the 25.4 and 25.7, which didn't work too well for me.  I have a Bach Corp. 11C with a 6 1/2 rim threaded on and I don't bottom out on that one.  Your mileage may vary (They're making me up a 25.4 with a C+ cup now).  My lips tend to protrude a bit farther into the cup on larger rim sizes. 

Overall impression: this is a very stable mouthpiece with punch and power.  Bright, crisp sound.  In recordings I'm surprised at how much cleaner this mouthpiece sounds than most others I'm using.  I'm using it as a lead/commercial and Dixieland piece.  It feels a lot like a Greg Black 11C that I have, but punchier and more flexible.  I can move easier between low and high registers.  The rim profile reminds me of a Greg Black Bonilla model.  It works best for me on a .500 and smaller horn.  I've used it on my dual bore .500/.508 but that leaves me wanting a little more room to fatten the tone in middle and low registers.  Again, YMMV.  (I'm looking forward to trying out a 25.4 with C+ cup on this horn.) 

While I have dozens (hundreds?) of mouthpieces at home, this is on the short list of ones that I use regularly.  As a dedicated lead piece this fits the bill with the sound of a small mouthpiece that links with trumpets (11C/12C) while giving me a little more room to move around into the middle and low register without compromising the sound on top.  It was a close call, but I opted for the 25.1 over the 24.8 for that reason.  I'd definitely look at the 24.8 as a killer 11C mouthpiece with even more support up top.  I might pick one up later to have as an option. 

Luke was very easy to work with, I would put it on a short list of things to try if you are looking for a lead piece.

Ben

Ben, your impressions are virtually the same as mine. I'm probably going to pick up a 25.1mm cup to have as an option to my current 24.8mm. The 60 throat (6mm)(.236") is standard, I believe, throughout the small shank designs. The middle number, 40, 43, or 46, has to do with how far down, or the length of the throat is, (I think). The last number, 10.5 refers to how thin the shank is. There are thinner and thicker versions but I'm not sure which direction those numbers go as it pertains to the thickness of the shank. It's my understanding that the 43 throat/backbore and 10.5 shank are the most popular.

Perhaps Luke will chime in to bring some clarity to all of this.

Sam, this piece has made everything easier for me. What ever is in my head seems to come out a whole lot easier than any of my other pieces. So much so, that I only use the AR.
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« Reply #13 on: Oct 21, 2017, 08:48AM »

For those interested, Antonio has enrolled as a member so you can send him messages.  I hope he chimes in soon.  I'm also interested in what is coming.
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« Reply #14 on: Oct 21, 2017, 10:33AM »

Anyone played the bass bone pieces?
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« Reply #15 on: Oct 21, 2017, 10:40AM »

Hello guys, nice to meet you all!
First time here, quick story about me: I'm an Air Traffic Controller in Italy (Breslmair is a former ATCo too, in Austria, strange coincidence!), I've been playing trumpet professionally for many years as a second job, collected a few hundreds trumpets, countless mouthpieces, immensely in love with brass instruments and curious by nature.
Long story short, I needed a mouthpiece that performed as I wanted, I couldn't have any maker do what I wanted, I bought a CNC lathe, I learnt by myself, I made a few prototypes, people loved them, I sold some, I bought another lathe, sold more, another lathe...
Next Tuesday I'll receive my 5th one, a HUGE one, finally my life will be a little easier, hopefully. :)

I also own and run the www.italiantrumpetforum.it, the biggest trumpet community in Italy, I'm sorry this forum is having connectivity issues, I know what it means. BIG kudos to the guy/guys who own and run it, it's not an easy task.

Back to the topic: first of all thanks to all of the guys who are writing such nice reviews, sales are important but happy customers are even more important!
I'm very glad Sam Burtis is playing one of my pieces, I remember talking about his videos about Vocal Overtones a few years back in my forum!

Here's a quick explanation of all the weird numbers:
60 is the throat, 6.0mm (European, sorry!)
There are 60 and 65 options for small shank mouthpieces but 95% of the customers use 60 as it's a bit of a standard and because you can have a wide array of feelings just by changing the rest of the backbore, most won't need the 65 option.
40-43-46 express how long the cylindrical part of the throat is (40 being the longest), this impacts how stable harmonics will be, how hard it will be to "lip bend" a note, how easy it is to center it, how hard you have to work to make a high note speak, how clean the articulation is, how difficult an harmonic slur is and, in part, how far apart the harmonics are.
The final number says how "open" the backbore is (bigger number=thinner wall at the end): this GREATLY impacts the back pressure feeling, the harmonic spread, the brightness of the sound, the articulation and other "minor" things.

I also have a Symphonic trombone and Bass trombone series, more in the next message.

I'll be more specific once I'm back home, wife calls, it's Saturday night here, I've made some 50 mouthpieces today, fingers hurt, nails are black and chipped, I need a shower and some food!

(Luke, THANKS A LOT! You are doing a great job, most of my sales are happening because of you!)
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« Reply #16 on: Oct 21, 2017, 12:26PM »

Anyone played the bass bone pieces?

Not many bass trombone pieces yet in the US. Iíll have more of the pieces in about a week for a few interested guys to check out and hopefully they can post impressions and review on here about them. Stay tuned.
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« Reply #17 on: Oct 21, 2017, 12:49PM »

Not in the US but several in Europe and Australia, both for Symphonic and Big Band.
I'm proceeding with baby steps simply because trombone mouthpieces are relatively new and I'm struggling to make trumpet ones at the moment. My hope is that with the new lathe I will automate most of the steps freeing time to spend on trombone.

Here's a paper I've written with Luke regarding small shank mouthpieces, it's not in its final form but should give a rough idea of what to expect:

Resonance Trombone Mouthpieces
Small Shank Models

Rim Contour Ė The rim is slightly flat, a bit like a small shank Bach 3.

Cup Ė All the tops have a C style cup with a tendency to a V that is matched with a rather edgy entrance to the throat. This helps with stability and articulation. They work well in many jazz and commercial settings.

Throat Ė Each piece has a ď60Ē designation meaning that it has a 6mm throat size. Throughout the testing phase this size has worked the best and you can adjust the overall performance of the piece with a different backbore. If you are used to playing small pieces with a larger throat a ď65Ē or 6.5mm option is available.

Tops Ė Each top is named after its rim diameter in millimeters.
26.00 Ė Comparable to a Bach 4 size
25.70 Ė Comparable to a Bach 5 size.
25.40 Ė Comparable to a Bach 6.5 size.
25.10 Ė Comparable to a Bach 6.75 size.
24.80 Ė Comparable to a Bach 7 size.
24.50 Ė Comparable to a Bach 12 size.

Backbores Ė Below are the three of our most popular backbores.

60 40 10.5 Ė Close overtone spacing. Works well for players that use more compression.

60 43 10.5 Ė Middle of the road. Works the best for most players and is the backbore we usually suggest trying first.

60 46 10.5 Ė Widest overtone spacing. Works well for players that use open air and players looking for a more classical feel from the piece.

Other less popular sizes are 60 40 11, 60 43 11 and 60 46 11. These have a thinner shank than their counterparts so they offer a bigger/brighter sound with less slotting allowing the player to manipulate the pitch more. They are better suited for players who need to have more control over the instrument but they also require more precision by the performer. They are available upon request.
The remaining 3 sizes are 60 40 10, 60 43 10 and 60 46 10, noticeably tighter in feel with a much darker sound, specific for those who need a lot of air resistance. They also offer quite a compressed harmonic series.


What, I hope, sets my mouthpieces apart from most brands is the possibility to match any cup and rim to the kind of feeling, intonation, sound and articulation you like choosing among 9 (or more, if really needed) kinds of backbores.
This started when I was looking for "the perfect trumpet mouthpiece" years ago. Countless experiments lead me to the conclusion that what most players actually need is not a rim or a cup but rather the back pressure feeling that they expect from "the system". The system is a combination of factors: the receiver, the bell, the bore, the player, the mouthpiece, the room and so on. Once you find the right balance rims and cups are less and less important because the embouchure tends to relax more throughout the entire range and we players need to blow less air, push less against the teeth with obvious advantages in terms of ease, tone, intonation, sound and stamina.
In fact most (99% ?) of my customers don't even ask for different rims once they find the right backbore. The same happens with trumpet mouthpieces where, on average, players tend to push a lot more.
With most other brands, instead, you have very limited options for backbores and they generally are tied to specific cups and rims, so we tend to think that rims and cups are what define a mouthpiece.

Another region of the mouthpiece that I have experimented a lot on is the curve leading to the throat, that is a very important area because has a huge impact on articulation and stability without having to mess with the actual cup diameter, depth and shape. I have scanned countless mouthpieces and almost all have a similar design in that area. I've decided to go to a different route and I think/hope this is one of the reasons why the mouthpieces feel easy and focused.

Time for another break!
See you later!
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« Reply #18 on: Oct 21, 2017, 02:51PM »

I live in switzerland and am interested in trying out your symphonic and bass trombone mouthpieces. How can i go about trying them out?

I am curious to try them in high level english style brass bands where volume and articulation demands are particular.
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« Reply #19 on: Oct 21, 2017, 04:05PM »

-----

Great stuff, Antonio. Thanks for all of the information you have provided. A little light went on in my head head when you mentioned that what most players need is not a rim or a cup but rather the back pressure feeling that they expect from "the system". BINGO!! That's it, and it is what makes your mouthpiece so efficient and easy to play.

I find that playing your mouthpiece allows me to steer in a very musically satisfying direction, and I am sure the reason is because of the beautifully balanced system which allows for efficiency and ease of playing.

-----
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Scott Bentall-Freelance
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« Reply #20 on: Oct 21, 2017, 10:56PM »

I live in switzerland and am interested in trying out your symphonic and bass trombone mouthpieces. How can i go about trying them out?

I am curious to try them in high level english style brass bands where volume and articulation demands are particular.

Hello!
If you live where the Matterhorn is you are pretty close to Torino, in Italy, where I live.
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« Reply #21 on: Oct 22, 2017, 05:40AM »

Not many bass trombone pieces yet in the US. Iíll have more of the pieces in about a week for a few interested guys to check out and hopefully they can post impressions and review on here about them. Stay tuned.

I would be interested in the smallest rim size(27.6) piece.
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« Reply #22 on: Oct 22, 2017, 09:06AM »

Here's a comparison chart for small shank mouthpieces:

https://docs.wixstatic.com/ugd/a6c7cc_15ac1463a0fe4d2a81950b04217d0faf.pdf

And here a list of sizes for the large shank ones, still working on a comparison chart:

https://docs.wixstatic.com/ugd/a6c7cc_6db8cde8e4374896be4f1083616f0af3.pdf

Also, here are some photos of mixed pieces, trumpet, trombone, tuba...

https://www.facebook.com/pg/arresonancesrl/photos/?tab=album&album_id=403105750105041

Please let me know if I'm pushing it too much, I don't want to make this a sales pitch post.
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« Reply #23 on: Oct 25, 2017, 04:12PM »

Hello all-

I recently got an AR Resonance mouthpiece from Luke (who has been great to deal with) and would like to share my experience.  I got a 24.8 top with three shanks- a 40, 43, and a 46.  On my .508 horn, the 40 was a tad tight.  The 43 was very usable, but I ended up feeling the most comfortable on the 46, the most open of the 3.  After a 30 minute acclimation warm up, I felt completely comfortable on it.  It is simply the quickest responding mouthpiece Iíve ever played.  There is zero lapse between what you think and what comes out.  Upper register is much improved from what Iím used to.  Everything feels very stable, and it's extremely easy to go between registers.  The pitch is also very stable, no matter how much air you put through the horn, it locks in.  The sound is very clean, clear and pleasant.  As The Sheriff stated, this mouthpiece makes me play like a better version of me.  Wow- I kept saying that over and over again.  I wasnít even in the market for a new piece, but after 45 minutes, I couldnít go back to my regular mouthpiece!  These guys are really on to something, and I'm excited to see what they'll come up with.  Especially with the bronze, copper, stainless steel and titanium possibilities in the future. 
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« Reply #24 on: Oct 27, 2017, 02:38PM »

Hello all-

I recently got an AR Resonance mouthpiece from Luke (who has been great to deal with) and would like to share my experience.  I got a 24.8 top with three shanks- a 40, 43, and a 46.  On my .508 horn, the 40 was a tad tight.  The 43 was very usable, but I ended up feeling the most comfortable on the 46, the most open of the 3.  After a 30 minute acclimation warm up, I felt completely comfortable on it.  It is simply the quickest responding mouthpiece Iíve ever played.  There is zero lapse between what you think and what comes out.  Upper register is much improved from what Iím used to.  Everything feels very stable, and it's extremely easy to go between registers.  The pitch is also very stable, no matter how much air you put through the horn, it locks in.  The sound is very clean, clear and pleasant.  As The Sheriff stated, this mouthpiece makes me play like a better version of me.  Wow- I kept saying that over and over again.  I wasnít even in the market for a new piece, but after 45 minutes, I couldnít go back to my regular mouthpiece!  These guys are really on to something, and I'm excited to see what they'll come up with.  Especially with the bronze, copper, stainless steel and titanium possibilities in the future. 

-----

Still diggin' it? I've had mine for a while now and it's my all time fave.

====
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« Reply #25 on: Oct 28, 2017, 04:06AM »

-----

Still diggin' it? I've had mine for a while now and it's my all time fave.

====

Hey Scott- 

Yes, I still love it.  This mouthpiece is magic.  It keeps getting better the more I play it.  There seems to be no limits on what it can do, other than my own weaknesses.  It makes me go for things I would normally shy away from, because I wasnít sure theyíd come out.   The equipment never gets in the way.  Iíve been telling everyone about these, because I think theyíre really onto something.  Iíd love to try the 25.1 at some point too, but Iím completely happy with the 24.8
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« Reply #26 on: Oct 28, 2017, 06:20AM »

Hey Scott- 

Yes, I still love it.  This mouthpiece is magic.  It keeps getting better the more I play it.  There seems to be no limits on what it can do, other than my own weaknesses.  It makes me go for things I would normally shy away from, because I wasnít sure theyíd come out.   The equipment never gets in the way.  Iíve been telling everyone about these, because I think theyíre really onto something.  Iíd love to try the 25.1 at some point too, but Iím completely happy with the 24.8
----

I hear ya, brother! I had a chance to try Joel Adams' 25.1 top on my 43-10.5 shank and I'm gonna stick with the 24.8. If anything, I might pick up a 46-10.5 shank. I remember liking it when I was at Luke's place, but chose the 43-10.5 because it was "me" all the way. However, the 46-10.5 would be perfect for my church gigs. The first thing that popped into my mind when I tried it was.... "legit".

===
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Williams 6 (Bob)
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Conn 71H
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« Reply #27 on: Oct 28, 2017, 09:24AM »

----

I hear ya, brother! I had a chance to try Joel Adams' 25.1 top on my 43-10.5 shank and I'm gonna stick with the 24.8. If anything, I might pick up a 46-10.5 shank. I remember liking it when I was at Luke's place, but chose the 43-10.5 because it was "me" all the way. However, the 46-10.5 would be perfect for my church gigs. The first thing that popped into my mind when I tried it was.... "legit".

===


Ah, Nice!  I have a buddy who is getting a 25.1 soon, so Iíll be able to check it out next week.  And I agree, for me, 46-10.5 made me a better ďmeĒ.  I canít wait to see what the other metal options play like.  These guys know what theyíre doing!
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« Reply #28 on: Oct 28, 2017, 10:02AM »

Thanks a LOT Jeff and Scott, these posts make me very happy!
Iíve finally had a couple of hours to record and edit a video with Luca Begonia, a wonderful musician from Italy who used to play with Clark Terry, and happens to be an AR Resonance Artist :)
Here a link to the video:

https://youtu.be/QstI_ITvVl4

I hope you like it!
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« Reply #29 on: Oct 28, 2017, 10:34AM »

Thanks a LOT Jeff and Scott, these posts make me very happy!
Iíve finally had a couple of hours to record and edit a video with Luca Begonia, a wonderful musician from Italy who used to play with Clark Terry, and happens to be an AR Resonance Artist :)
Here a link to the video:

https://youtu.be/QstI_ITvVl4

I hope you like it!
====

You're welcome. Nice video. Thanks.

------
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« Reply #30 on: Oct 28, 2017, 02:50PM »

Thanks a LOT Jeff and Scott, these posts make me very happy!
Iíve finally had a couple of hours to record and edit a video with Luca Begonia, a wonderful musician from Italy who used to play with Clark Terry, and happens to be an AR Resonance Artist :)
Here a link to the video:

https://youtu.be/QstI_ITvVl4

I hope you like it!
Thanks for the video, and the great mouthpieces! 
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« Reply #31 on: Nov 02, 2017, 05:43AM »

Hi everyone,

I couldn't agree more with Jeff Martin on this!  I received the AR Resonance mouthpiece from Luke and I'm blown away.  First off, Luke is amazing to deal with.  He is professional, responds very quickly and just a super nice guy.  I received the same mouthpiece as Jeff, the 24.8 top with three shanks- a 40, 43, and a 46.  I play on a .500 bore and at first the 40 felt just a little tight for me.   So I moved to the 43 and I felt like I was at home right away.  I'm not an equipment junkie at all......I've been playing the same horns and mouthpieces for a long time.  But for some reason, this mouthpiece is allowing me to play WAY more efficiently than ever before.  The 46 feels a little more open but I kept going back to the 43 as that felt more comfortable for me.  After a week or so of playing on the 43 shank, I moved back to the 40 and it doesn't feel as tight anymore.  The slots in the upper and lower register are amazing.  You can scream in the upper register or you can play soft and high without any "crispy critters" sneaking into your sound.  The pitch locks in, articulation sounds great and it's just EASY to play.

I went back to my regular mouthpiece and it's just not the same.  Everyone I've played for on this mouthpiece absolute loves it more than what I was playing before.  Plus, it looks pretty cool! As a non-gearhead, I HIGHLY recommend checking this company out.  They are on to something and I can't wait to see what else they come out with.
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« Reply #32 on: Nov 02, 2017, 07:22PM »

I've been waiting to jump in on this thread until I had extensive quality time on my AR Resonance mouthpiece.

I bought a 24.8 top a couple of months ago, to use with my Lawler .500 (fantastic, but that's another thread), and quickly settled on the 43 back bore. The first blow was an "ah-ha!" moment like other have described here - wow-this-is-amazing kind of reaction. Like earlier posts, the mouthpiece blew so freely, with less effort, and great tone and clear articulation all over the horn from top to bottom.

Over time that feeling persisted, though at times it felt too small to me. I had a really busy fall, with a few weekends where I had as many as seven gigs over three days, and along about the fourth or fifth gig the 24.8 would start to feel a little cramped. I asked Luke to send along a 25.1 top. For me, it is even better. More room, more flexibility, absolutely no loss in the upper register, and for me it accentuates all of the good qualities I was enjoying in the 24.8. To me, this supports AR Resonance's assertion that the back bore is at least as important as the rim and cup.

I agree with the comments from earlier posts, and would add that it feels like it encourages proper support and articulation. I've played *many* 11C's and most recently one from a highly-regarded custom maker that I played for several months and really liked it, but only when playing the AR did I realize how much I was fighting it, and prior pieces I had used. I am not fighting the AR, it's liberating my efforts.

Gotta say, really amazing. When I think about how long people have been making trombone mouthpieces, it's impressive to see such an improvement in something so simple.

And Luke is a great guy to work with. Flexible, responsive, and accommodating. And I've already paid for everything so I'm not buttering him up.

My 2 cents, and cheers,

Don Mikkelsen
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« Reply #33 on: Nov 02, 2017, 08:44PM »

Wow, so many options, how do you make a decision?
I'm currently using a Schilke 59 on my Shires Trom, could someone suggest what the closest model from AR would be?
And just to throw in a complete newbie question, what different does the colour make, silver, rose or yellow gold?
I can see why there would be different sounds from bell made from different materials, but I honestly don't see how a MP made from different materials would make that much of a difference?
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« Reply #34 on: Nov 03, 2017, 05:52AM »

Firstly, all the discussion so far has been on tenor mouthpieces; generally between 11C and 5G size.

For the question about color affecting the sound, the color you see is a plating -- most mouthpieces are made of brass.  The different materials (generally silver plate vs. gold plate) affect how the mouthpiece feels.  This may affect your playing but shouldn't.  I would be cautious about any "colored" gold plate since a common metal used to change the color is nickel and some have an allergy to nickel.
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Bruce Guttman
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« Reply #35 on: Nov 03, 2017, 06:35AM »

Again, thanks to ALL of you guys, these reviews are very welcome!
I don't believe the finish on a mouthpiece affects sound or at least not in a way most players say they perceive. I'm leaning more toward the idea that the FEEL of the material affects our perception and ability to relax while playing. Gold is definitely more slippery and feels warmer to most, this totally has an effect on how you can play and thus sound, that's for sure.
Colored gold can be obtained in different ways, in my case 99.999999% of my gold plated mouthpieces are 24Kt, no additional things like cobalt that many use for hardening the surface: it doesn't look the same as 24Kt gold in my opinion.
My rose gold is just a mixture of 24Kt with copper, no Nickel at all. While people can be allergic to anything nowadays copper is less likely than Nickel. Still, I think pure gold is the best option and, to me, looks better in person than rose gold.
Silver: you can't go wrong, less striking but cheaper and looks cool enough already. :)
(Soon-ish I'll make them in surgical grade steel and possibly in phosphor bronze)
Thanks a lot to everybody!
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« Reply #36 on: Nov 03, 2017, 08:28AM »

Again, thanks to ALL of you guys, these reviews are very welcome!
I don't believe the finish on a mouthpiece affects sound or at least not in a way most players say they perceive. I'm leaning more toward the idea that the FEEL of the material affects our perception and ability to relax while playing. Gold is definitely more slippery and feels warmer to most, this totally has an effect on how you can play and thus sound, that's for sure.
Colored gold can be obtained in different ways, in my case 99.999999% of my gold plated mouthpieces are 24Kt, no additional things like cobalt that many use for hardening the surface: it doesn't look the same as 24Kt gold in my opinion.
My rose gold is just a mixture of 24Kt with copper, no Nickel at all. While people can be allergic to anything nowadays copper is less likely than Nickel. Still, I think pure gold is the best option and, to me, looks better in person than rose gold.
Silver: you can't go wrong, less striking but cheaper and looks cool enough already. :)
(Soon-ish I'll make them in surgical grade steel and possibly in phosphor bronze)
Thanks a lot to everybody!

 

I would love trying a bronze and stainless steel piece.  Iíll be on the lookout for those! 
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« Reply #37 on: Nov 03, 2017, 08:47AM »

I`m becoming interested in these. I play (mostly) a Bach 7C.
Do they have a similar rim and how does the cup compare?
I really like the sound and feel of my 7C`s but.... being the gear geek that I am
has anyone played a 7C -ish model?
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« Reply #38 on: Nov 03, 2017, 09:24AM »

I`m becoming interested in these. I play (mostly) a Bach 7C.
Do they have a similar rim and how does the cup compare?
I really like the sound and feel of my 7C`s but.... being the gear geek that I am
has anyone played a 7C -ish model?

From the guys that have left a post I believe Don Mikkelsen is now playing a 25.1mm top and that would be the closest to a 7C size. Kevin Cerovich just tried the 25.1 as well and is ordering one in gold plate.
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« Reply #39 on: Nov 03, 2017, 12:07PM »

I got my 25.4 V+ and C+ cups in this week.   

WOW.   

Totally blows my best Mt. Vernon 6 1/2AL out of the water.  I've gravitated more toward the V+; it's a little easier to blow through the harmonic series of the horn.  A little more slippery, which I like.  The C+ has more bounce but grips more.  I'm waiting to try some of the other backbores before making a final determination, i think the right backbore could make the C+ a good "lead" piece for me.  I'm hooked.

Everything is so stable, extremely easy to play in all ranges of the horn.  It doesn't have the same 'pop' up top as the standard C cup up high, but it's thicker and richer below middle Bb. 

Ben

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« Reply #40 on: Nov 03, 2017, 01:47PM »

I`m becoming interested in these. I play (mostly) a Bach 7C.
Do they have a similar rim and how does the cup compare?
I really like the sound and feel of my 7C`s but.... being the gear geek that I am
has anyone played a 7C -ish model?
---

See reply #22 and look at the comparison chart that Antonio provides a link to. The 24.8 top is closer to a 7C than the 25.1 according to the comparison chart. Try both.

==
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Scott Bentall-Freelance
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Kanstul 1606 (prototype)
Williams 6 (Bob)
1935 Williams "L" Arrowhead
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« Reply #41 on: Nov 03, 2017, 02:00PM »

Any comments re: large shank 4G-5G size? ~26.00mm
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« Reply #42 on: Nov 03, 2017, 02:20PM »

I got my 25.4 V+ and C+ cups in this week.   

WOW.   

Totally blows my best Mt. Vernon 6 1/2AL out of the water.  I've gravitated more toward the V+; it's a little easier to blow through the harmonic series of the horn.  A little more slippery, which I like.  The C+ has more bounce but grips more.  I'm waiting to try some of the other backbores before making a final determination, i think the right backbore could make the C+ a good "lead" piece for me.  I'm hooked.

Everything is so stable, extremely easy to play in all ranges of the horn.  It doesn't have the same 'pop' up top as the standard C cup up high, but it's thicker and richer below middle Bb. 

Ben


----

Ben, if you would please, tell us more about the V+ and C+ cups. How they differ from the standard cup, etcetera.

Thanks...

===
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Scott Bentall-Freelance
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Kanstul 1606 (prototype)
Williams 6 (Bob)
1935 Williams "L" Arrowhead
Conn 71H
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« Reply #43 on: Nov 03, 2017, 05:55PM »

----

Ben, if you would please, tell us more about the V+ and C+ cups. How they differ from the standard cup, etcetera.

Thanks...

===

Yes, please.....Iíd love to hear more, Ben. 
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« Reply #44 on: Nov 04, 2017, 09:29AM »

----

Ben, if you would please, tell us more about the V+ and C+ cups. How they differ from the standard cup, etcetera.

Thanks...

===
Yes, please.....Iíd love to hear more, Ben. 

It's been a while since I've been measuring mouthpieces, but in general, the V+ and C+ cups are a fair amount deeper than the "C" cup I have.  They feel more a kin to a 6 1/2AL cup in terms of depth, with the V+ feeling a bit deeper than the C+.    The cups seem to continue a similar angle/contour to this depth with the C+ "bowling", or flattening, out considerably before going into the cup and the V+ being much more seamless. 

Playing characteristics of the V+ is as different as a 12C to a 6 1/2AL.  The 25.1 C cup I have feels punchy and supportive, and a crushing upper register.  The V+ and C+ definitely have more room and feel larger.  More air is needed to support.  I keep coming back to a 6 1/2AL comparison and I feel it's apt.  But it feels rounder and more supported than any 6 1/2 I've played.  The sound doesn't get away from you.  Does that make sense?

The C+ is a different animal that I haven't completely figured out.  It has some of the punch of the normal "C" cup, but it doesn't move as easily between harmonics.  It feel too locked into certain notes.  Perhaps a different backbore will help alleviate this, as the sound is a bit denser than the V+, and I thinkt hat could be really useful in some situations.

Definitely apples and oranges.  I'm using my 43 backbore that I picked out with the 25.1 top.  I'm looking forward to checking otu different backbores with these tops.

Ben
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« Reply #45 on: Nov 04, 2017, 09:43AM »

It's been a while since I've been measuring mouthpieces, but in general, the V+ and C+ cups are a fair amount deeper than the "C" cup I have.  They feel more a kin to a 6 1/2AL cup in terms of depth, with the V+ feeling a bit deeper than the C+.    The cups seem to continue a similar angle/contour to this depth with the C+ "bowling", or flattening, out considerably before going into the cup and the V+ being much more seamless. 

Playing characteristics of the V+ is as different as a 12C to a 6 1/2AL.  The 25.1 C cup I have feels punchy and supportive, and a crushing upper register.  The V+ and C+ definitely have more room and feel larger.  More air is needed to support.  I keep coming back to a 6 1/2AL comparison and I feel it's apt.  But it feels rounder and more supported than any 6 1/2 I've played.  The sound doesn't get away from you.  Does that make sense?

The C+ is a different animal that I haven't completely figured out.  It has some of the punch of the normal "C" cup, but it doesn't move as easily between harmonics.  It feel too locked into certain notes.  Perhaps a different backbore will help alleviate this, as the sound is a bit denser than the V+, and I thinkt hat could be really useful in some situations.

Definitely apples and oranges.  I'm using my 43 backbore that I picked out with the 25.1 top.  I'm looking forward to checking otu different backbores with these tops.

Ben


Ben...

Are you going to be in the NYC area any time soon? I'd really like to try those cup variations.

Sam
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« Reply #46 on: Nov 04, 2017, 09:44AM »

Ben...

Are you going to be in the NYC area any time soon? I'd really like to try those cup variations.

Sam

Ditto that.
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« Reply #47 on: Nov 04, 2017, 10:45AM »




https://www.dropbox.com/s/f3anz3udzs1d7if/Foto%2004-11-17%2C%2018%2014%2028.jpg?dl=0

Hello!
I'll do my best to explain how they look and what they are meant for and please excuse me if I'm using a highly modified drawing (distorted on purpose in both axis and in the features themselves) but it's way too easy nowadays to replicate stuff that costed me so much time to prototype.
The idea behind the C+ is to increase the sense of stability of the harmonics and "punch" in the attacks and in the articulation. That curve serves for this scope and the way that curve changes from concave to convex brings to the other feature that's in a way what defines my mouthpieces on the cup side of them: the "transition to the throat".
There are no less than 10 parameters that play a role on how a mouthpiece sounds and feels and what we generally have access to when we want to change a parameter of a mouthpieces is, in most cases, just different cup options. To me this is like saying that to have a smoother running feel on a shoe you need to get a couple of sizes more. Or that a better grip on the sole is achieved by tightening the shoe laces.
Those curves are the cup-side homologous to the different shapes of the backbores I make: you shouldn't change what is familiar and appreciated (rim shape and diameter, cup volume and so on) to achieve different sound, performance, intonation, articulation and so on.

The V+ is a tick more towards what a trumpet player would call "a flugely sound" (well, that's how an Italian would translate it...): smoother sound, slots less defined and more prone to bending, slippery feeling when doing slurred harmonics and so on. It also feels more open even if the throat and backbore are the same. I would say it has a less brassy sound that can be very good in certain situations but it's a bit harder to tame.

Technically speaking the C+ has the same cup depth as my standard one but it's indeed perceived as deeper (that's why I hardly do what a player asks when he wants to modify something, I instead do what I know will make the player feel what he wants, unless the player already has direct experience with mouthpiece makers). In a way I wouldn't call the V+ a deeper cup as well, it's simply a different concept, not really related to the standard one.
But then we get to the hard topic of defining geometry, feeling and sound with words: where do we measure the depth? When does a cup end and where does the throat begin? When do we measure the internal diameter of a continuous curve?

Hope it makes sense!

What is important to me is that everyone is different (and every instrument is different!) and there is no chance a single size can fit all, that's why I make different backbores and cups. :)

Ciao!
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« Reply #48 on: Nov 04, 2017, 10:50AM »

For images, see here:

http://tromboneforum.org/index.php/topic,75147.0.html

Note that the Forum is not accepting images of any kind for upload; even to the Gallery.  You need to host your image somewhere else and "point" to it here using IMG tags as explained in the thread.

Looking forward to more edification.
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« Reply #49 on: Nov 04, 2017, 10:50AM »

Dropbox saved me again! :D
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« Reply #50 on: Nov 04, 2017, 10:56AM »

Thank you, Tony, for the explanation, it makes perfect sense.

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« Reply #51 on: Nov 04, 2017, 11:04AM »

Thank you, Tony, for the explanation, it makes perfect sense.


----

Yes, the explanation and drawing really brings it together for me.

Thanks Ben, and of course, Antonio.

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« Reply #52 on: Nov 19, 2017, 08:43AM »

I've been following this thread for a while, and have been over to the AR site. It's a 2 piece system right? A few diagrams (including shanks) and a simple overview would be helpful rather than having to pick out details from TTF posts. Better to lay out the benefits and advantages straight off the top without having to trawl through dropdowns to find that it is a 2 piece system. That's for the home page surely. The prices don't include the cost of individual parts, say, a top and 2 shanks for example. 

It does lend a certain mystique to the product though. Confused
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« Reply #53 on: Nov 20, 2017, 05:40AM »

Has anyone found a list or chart for the Backbore spec's? Nine different types?
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« Reply #54 on: Nov 20, 2017, 06:16AM »


Backbores Ė Below are the three of our most popular backbores.

60 40 10.5 Ė Close overtone spacing. Works well for players that use more compression.

60 43 10.5 Ė Middle of the road. Works the best for most players and is the backbore we usually suggest trying first.

60 46 10.5 Ė Widest overtone spacing. Works well for players that use open air and players looking for a more classical feel from the piece.

Other less popular sizes are 60 40 11, 60 43 11 and 60 46 11. These have a thinner shank than their counterparts so they offer a bigger/brighter sound with less slotting allowing the player to manipulate the pitch more. They are better suited for players who need to have more control over the instrument but they also require more precision by the performer. They are available upon request.
The remaining 3 sizes are 60 40 10, 60 43 10 and 60 46 10, noticeably tighter in feel with a much darker sound, specific for those who need a lot of air resistance. They also offer quite a compressed harmonic series.

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« Reply #55 on: Nov 20, 2017, 06:23AM »

Hello Pre59!
Sorry, my fault, the way this thread developed didn't allow for a recap of everything in the very first message, I think Luke or the Moderators can help with it.
It's a two parts system: top includes rim and cup, the other bit is the backbore (shank?).
Mouthpieces have different throats depending on the kind of mouthpieces: 6.00 and 6.50 millimeters for small shank mouthpieces, 7.20 and 8.00mm for large shank and bass trombone models.
All small shank share the same rim (but anything can be made on request) and all large shank share the same (but different from the small shank one) rim.
There is a comparison chart on the website that's an ongoing project (I don't really have much time to spend on my computer unfortunately).
Backbores all offer different feelings, sounds and harmonic series: describing the actual shape is very hard but we made the effort to summarize the outcome of most of them.
Unfortunately spending words like "it's great, it has a perfect intonation, best articulation ever" don't really help any customer so I let players express their opinion on them as we players talk by feelings and not by numbers or geometry.
It's a shame I can't help a lot more than this at this moment but I promise I'll do my best to serve you and the rest of the guys in the forum with a more comprehensive description as soon as possible.
I'm sorry you have the feeling I'm trying to add some mystique to my mouthpieces, it's totally the opposite: I try my best to explain things to my best ability but the nature of it makes it very hard.
While I work on a better description is there any specific question you would like to ask regarding the characteristics of the mouthpieces?
Tony
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« Reply #56 on: Nov 20, 2017, 06:54AM »

I've been following this thread for a while, and have been over to the AR site. It's a 2 piece system right? A few diagrams (including shanks) and a simple overview would be helpful rather than having to pick out details from TTF posts. Better to lay out the benefits and advantages straight off the top without having to trawl through dropdowns to find that it is a 2 piece system. That's for the home page surely. The prices don't include the cost of individual parts, say, a top and 2 shanks for example. 

It does lend a certain mystique to the product though. Confused

Hi,
I did mention that it is a two piece system in the original post on this thread and then a bit later Tony commented with a full description of the system and what each backbore does. Iíll make sure that all this information makes it to the website as well as the exact pricing in Euro and USD.
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« Reply #57 on: Nov 20, 2017, 08:57AM »

Thanks for the replies. Sorry about the "mystique" line, I was a bit frustrated by then..


 
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« Reply #58 on: Dec 05, 2017, 01:23AM »

Well, after following this thread and various recommendations I took the plunge.

I ordered a 25.1 /60-43-10.5 in silver

I've played it for a few days now and can honestly say it's blown everything else I've owned/tried in that size out of the water!!!

Totally blown away....... Thank you to the folk on here for bringing Antonios work to our attention and congratulations on an amazing product  Sing it!
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« Reply #59 on: Dec 09, 2017, 04:57AM »

Glad you enjoy it Chris.  I'm definitely enjoying mine!
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« Reply #60 on: Dec 16, 2017, 03:28AM »

Well, after following this thread and various recommendations I took the plunge.

I ordered a 25.1 /60-43-10.5 in silver

I've played it for a few days now and can honestly say it's blown everything else I've owned/tried in that size out of the water!!!

Totally blown away....... Thank you to the folk on here for bringing Antonios work to our attention and congratulations on an amazing product  Sing it!

Tweaked a little and now on a 26.0/60-43-10.5 in silver :-) Much better fit "For me"
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« Reply #61 on: Dec 16, 2017, 04:29AM »

Tweaked a little and now on a 26.0/60-43-10.5 in silver :-) Much better fit "For me"

Chris,

How did the product change work, was it a sale or return or have you kept the first m/p part/s?
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« Reply #62 on: Dec 16, 2017, 10:36AM »

I'll return the first one.
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« Reply #63 on: Dec 16, 2017, 12:10PM »

Just want to update quickly:

Loved my original top, but the rim was a little too small for my lips. I ordered one from Luke with a slightly larger rim, same cup size, itís right on the money. 10.5-46 backbore still.

Amazing mouthpiece. Still my go-to, and makes every horn I own sound even better and easier to play.
Sold the original top to a trombonist in California and he is enjoying it very much on his Bach 36B. Game changer.

Sidebar: I think I know half a dozen trombonists, including myself, playing on lawler .500 bores with AR mouthpieces. Amazing modern trombone combination. These pieces also really bring zip and new energy to Williams trombones. Works so well with my Williams Model 7...vintage and modern synergy, I call it.

Bravo Antonio!!

-RJM
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« Reply #64 on: Dec 16, 2017, 01:13PM »

Anyone playing any of Antonio's bass pieces? Thoughts?

Andrew
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« Reply #65 on: Dec 16, 2017, 02:35PM »

I'm on day 5 with a 25.1/60/10.5 with 43 & 46 backbores.  I experimented with the two backbones on the first few days, and for a while thought the 46 was going to work best. On the third night, I went back and forth between the AR and my Shires 11C (closer to 25.1 in actuality), and think I've determined that the 43 is probably a better all around fit, at least with the Williams 4 (.490)  I'm playing.
The openness and presence of sound is astonishing. I agree with previous comments that the upper register feels more secure, giving me more confidence up there.  I'm suddenly finding myself able to 'paste' D's, Eb's and F's like never before.

I can't wait to try this on my Williams 6 and Lawler .500 when I get home in April!

Once I feel fully adjusted, I'll report back with some more thoughts.  So far, so good!
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« Reply #66 on: Dec 16, 2017, 02:46PM »

Any chance that someone will have these at the American Trombone Workshop in March?
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« Reply #67 on: Dec 16, 2017, 04:39PM »

Any chance that someone will have these at the American Trombone Workshop in March?

I doubt it. Since Iím a player first I donít have time to make it to shows. If youíre interested hit me up at lmalewic(at)gmail.com. I let guys try them for a few days before making a decision (I do require a payment up front) and players really dig the pieces.
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« Reply #68 on: Dec 18, 2017, 01:35PM »

Hello guys, thanks a lot, again!
I'll try to reply to a few things:
I don't offer a trial service myself, it's impossible for me: I can barely make the mouthpieces customers or dealers order and in most cases is impractical because I live in Italy and shipping plus custom duties plus restocking fees would simply cost too much.
Some dealers offer this service (Luke most notably) but it's something he does, please don't ask me to do it.
Shops of course allow customers to try and everyone is invited to visit me in Italy to test many more sizes than any shop can carry. And if you think that US to Italy is a long trip... already six guys from Australia visited me this year alone! :D
Plus, it's Italy!!!

American Trombone Workshop: when is it? How does it work? Am I still in time to do it?

RJMason: thanks! I don't even know many of the trombone models you guys are playing but I'm glad you are finding my pieces fit for those horns. I never conceived the mouthpieces for a specific style of music or instrument, I'm just trying to make something that is as efficient and easy as possible, hopefully this makes them apt to many styles of music.
With my trumpet pieces I've seen a strange trend: depending on the country some call them "jazz pieces", some call them "classical pieces". To me it means that they can be used for any genre. :)
I've recently sold 4 mouthpieces to 4 top class Orchestra players in Italy and Switzerland and one of the pieces is exactly the one that Alan Kaplan is using. Again, this tells me that efficiency is the most important thing.
Luke is getting a few new cups (V+) in a matter of two days plus some more standard tops and backbores, don't make him sleep, bug him day and night! :D
Ciao!
Tony
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« Reply #69 on: Dec 18, 2017, 02:23PM »

The American Trombone Workshop is a yearly event hosted by the US Army Band.  It is in March.

http://www.usarmyband.com/trombone/
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« Reply #70 on: Dec 18, 2017, 02:40PM »

Tweaked a little and now on a 26.0/60-43-10.5 in silver :-) Much better fit "For me"

Still flirting with the 25.1 ...........  :/
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« Reply #71 on: Dec 19, 2017, 10:42PM »

Still flirting with the 25.1 ...........  :/

Hello Chris, how did you go about choosing initial sizes to try? I live in Sweden so would have to have some parts sent, but as Antonio wrote, itís impractical for him to send many parts, which I fully understand.
Cheers, John
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« Reply #72 on: Dec 20, 2017, 01:11AM »

I just chose the 2 sizes of mouthpiece rim that I already play on and asked for the most common cup and backbone shapes.
Cheers,
Chris.
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« Reply #73 on: Dec 20, 2017, 11:02PM »

Just want to update quickly:

Loved my original top, but the rim was a little too small for my lips. I ordered one from Luke with a slightly larger rim, same cup size, itís right on the money. 10.5-46 backbore still.

Amazing mouthpiece. Still my go-to, and makes every horn I own sound even better and easier to play.
Sold the original top to a trombonist in California and he is enjoying it very much on his Bach 36B. Game changer.

Sidebar: I think I know half a dozen trombonists, including myself, playing on lawler .500 bores with AR mouthpieces. Amazing modern trombone combination. These pieces also really bring zip and new energy to Williams trombones. Works so well with my Williams Model 7...vintage and modern synergy, I call it.

Bravo Antonio!!

-RJM

Hey! Thatís me!  After getting used to the mouthpiece with 7 shows of ďAnnieĒ and 2 Christian Rock Christmas Church gig, I have to agree, Definitely a game changer.  It just makes everything a little smoother and easier.  Currently using the 46-10.5 backbore.  The 43 was just a little tight for the 36B but would have been perfect if I still  had my Bach 16M.  Part of me wants to try the 25.7 size, but thatís just a thought as Iím pretty happy with the 25.4.
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« Reply #74 on: Dec 21, 2017, 09:48AM »

I got my 25.4 V+ and C+ cups in this week.   

WOW.   

Totally blows my best Mt. Vernon 6 1/2AL out of the water.  I've gravitated more toward the V+; it's a little easier to blow through the harmonic series of the horn.  A little more slippery, which I like.  The C+ has more bounce but grips more.  I'm waiting to try some of the other backbores before making a final determination, i think the right backbore could make the C+ a good "lead" piece for me.  I'm hooked.

Everything is so stable, extremely easy to play in all ranges of the horn.  It doesn't have the same 'pop' up top as the standard C cup up high, but it's thicker and richer below middle Bb. 

Ben

Hello Ben. I am finding the same thing w/the standard C cup...great above middle Bb, progressively less good...for me...on the way down from there. What shanks are you using on the C+ and V+?
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« Reply #75 on: Dec 21, 2017, 10:01AM »

What would be the 5G-ish sizes, and any feedback on them?
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« Reply #76 on: Dec 21, 2017, 12:08PM »

Hello Ben. I am finding the same thing w/the standard C cup...great above middle Bb, progressively less good...for me...on the way down from there. What shanks are you using on the C+ and V+?

Hi Sam,

I found the C+ to not work for me.  I've tried a bunch and it just is a little too dull.  I'm using a 43 shank on the V+ and now a 46 on the C.  The slightly bigger opens it up for me.  I'm curious if there's a V of similar depth/style to the standard C...
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« Reply #77 on: Dec 21, 2017, 03:43PM »

Hi Sam,

I found the C+ to not work for me.  I've tried a bunch and it just is a little too dull.  I'm using a 43 shank on the V+ and now a 46 on the C.  The slightly bigger opens it up for me.  I'm curious if there's a V of similar depth/style to the standard C...

Hmmmm...I'm using a 46 11 shank on the C and it's still not as good below middle Bb as I need. Even my NY 11C is better down there, as are of course the NY Clarke S and Mt. Vernon 6.5A too.

S.
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« Reply #78 on: Dec 23, 2017, 09:08AM »

Hey guys, just wanted to clear something up so it's not confusing. At the moment we are offering a standard cup and a V+ cup. The C+ that Ben has was a prototype we tried for him.
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« Reply #79 on: Dec 25, 2017, 12:35PM »

Tomorrow Iím traveling back to the USA to visit family and will be dragging my horn along so I can tryout an AR mouthpiece.

Since itís been a good long time since Iíve messed around with different pieces, let alone changing parts, I thought Iíd ask if any of you have ideas on how to go about that. Do I warm up on what Iíve been using and then start trying the new bits?

Any advice is welcome and seasons greatings to all,

John
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« Reply #80 on: Dec 25, 2017, 02:30PM »

Tomorrow Iím traveling back to the USA to visit family and will be dragging my horn along so I can tryout an AR mouthpiece.

Since itís been a good long time since Iíve messed around with different pieces, let alone changing parts, I thought Iíd ask if any of you have ideas on how to go about that. Do I warm up on what Iíve been using and then start trying the new bits?

Any advice is welcome and seasons greatings to all,

John
I'm sure Luke will help you get fitted.

Basically, start with what you use now and identify what you'd like to do better.  Then Luke can see if a change of backbore (or even cup) will help.

Good luck.
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« Reply #81 on: Dec 26, 2017, 03:35AM »

Just a tip for anyone with an AR - It might be a good idea to put a little oil in the threads of the cup-backbore connection.  I'm wishing I had done this.  Right now, mine is stuck together and I can't seem to get the two pieces separated. If all else fails, I'll see if I can get someone at Landress Brass to fix it when my ship gets to NY in a few weeks.
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« Reply #82 on: Dec 26, 2017, 05:28AM »

Hello Dave!
Unfortunately oil or grease won't help, I've tried all kinds of tricks and asked a few well known friends who make threaded mouthpieces, they always get stuck if you screw them good.
At the same time there's an easy fix, just get two pieces of THICK rubber and a plier. Bite on the backbore with the plier and hold the top with the hand, it will unscrew very easily.
Rubber is important both because you don't want to mark the mouthpiece and because it will help gripping on the mouthpiece. Trying with bare hands it simply impossible.
Let me know if it works!
Merry Christmas! (I'm late, I know... :) )
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« Reply #83 on: Dec 26, 2017, 06:17AM »

I use teflon tape on my threads. Not sure if the tolerances will work on these pieces but they work well on my DE pieces.
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« Reply #84 on: Dec 26, 2017, 06:32AM »

Just a tip for anyone with an AR - It might be a good idea to put a little oil in the threads of the cup-backbore connection.  I'm wishing I had done this.  Right now, mine is stuck together and I can't seem to get the two pieces separated. If all else fails, I'll see if I can get someone at Landress Brass to fix it when my ship gets to NY in a few weeks.
====

That happened to mine and I did what Antonio suggested I do. A good pair of pliers with some rubber. Bingo, off it came. I used rubber from an old bicycle inner tube I had lying around. After that I put a drop of liquid wrench brand penetrating oil on the threads and it has helped.

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« Reply #85 on: Dec 27, 2017, 01:22AM »

Will there be a booth for these at ITF?
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« Reply #86 on: Dec 27, 2017, 11:44AM »

I'll try! :)
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« Reply #87 on: Dec 27, 2017, 12:17PM »

I also use a silicone-coated oven mitt on each hand which provides me with enough grip around the rim and backbore.  :D Teflon tape works well, too, as Matt K. suggested.
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« Reply #88 on: Dec 29, 2017, 06:22AM »

Hmmmm...I'm using a 46 11 shank on the C and it's still not as good below middle Bb as I need. Even my NY 11C is better down there, as are of course the NY Clarke S and Mt. Vernon 6.5A too.

S.

Hi Sam, I wonder if mouthpiece insertion depth would solve that.  I little teflon to back it out a smidge.
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« Reply #89 on: Dec 29, 2017, 08:22AM »

Hi Sam, I wonder if mouthpiece insertion depth would solve that.  I little teflon to back it out a smidge.

Isn't a restricted lower range an inevitable outcome of a V shaped 'piece, hence the V/Cup that makers like Marc produce. My Marc 11 was in that mould.
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« Reply #90 on: Dec 29, 2017, 09:22AM »

Isn't a restricted lower range an inevitable outcome of a V shaped 'piece, hence the V/Cup that makers like Marc produce. My Marc 11 was in that mould.

I haven't ever found this to be the case. There's so many other variable that could explain it, but in general, a V shaped cup does not restrict low range.   
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« Reply #91 on: Dec 29, 2017, 04:59PM »

Hi Sam, I wonder if mouthpiece insertion depth would solve that.  I little teflon to back it out a smidge.

I've messed with it, Ben. The whole m'pce is a little longer than the ones I am used to playing, so backing the m'pce out a little is pretty much not an option...too flat for my extended 1st position preferences. And...since I am not going to take down the shanks on m'pces I have on spec or mess with my leadpipes, putting it in further won't work either.

The dues of equipment search... :-0 :-0 :-0 Hi Hi Amazed

S.
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« Reply #92 on: Dec 30, 2017, 05:26AM »

I haven't ever found this to be the case. There's so many other variable that could explain it, but in general, a V shaped cup does not restrict low range.   

Apart from the modular nature of these 'pieces, the 2 main differences (as far as I can tell) are, a angular edge to the throat horizon and a V profile. My own experience with V cups has been with some early Jet Tones and Giardinelli 5Ds'. I always had to go with a wider model to restore the lower register.
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« Reply #93 on: Jan 03, 2018, 08:51PM »

Alan Kaplan has a signature model now.

https://www.facebook.com/arresonancesrl/posts/431678343914448
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« Reply #94 on: Jan 06, 2018, 06:41AM »

I know this is still a bit in the future but we are planning on attending the ITF in July. I will keep you updated as we solidify our plans but this will be a great place to try out everything if you are planning on attending. Since itís only a few hours from Chicago it would be an easy drive so weíre planing on making it happen.
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« Reply #95 on: Jan 07, 2018, 01:46AM »

After reading here, I recently became an owner of one of these mouthpieces. I havenít been one to experiment with mouthpieces so I felt it was time to try something new. This also corresponds with changing my ideal sound and what my goals are now.

Just for some background, Iíve been using a 6 1/2 AL rim screwed onto and 11C cup for my Rath R10 .500 bore. I have also tried a Monette but never liked it.

When I first received both a 24.1 and a 24.4 cups from Luke, I immediately appreciated the ease. However, I found that my articulations were less clear and I fatigued faster than I should. Each time I played, things got better and easier. I think I really needed to make some changes in the way I have been playing and needed to make a transition to the new mouthpiece.

The piece I had been using feels much deeper that the AR top and I think the old one was too deep. I was doing some kind of movements in order to get the older setup to work. With the AR, large intervals and the high range because much easier. It also seems like the response is much more immediate. There were three shanks to try, 60/40/10.5, 43 and 46. I gravitated towards the bigger shank and had almost decided on the 10/46 shank but inadvertently tried the 43 a day later, finding it to be a great setup.

In addition to them being great mouthpieces, Luke who sells them was very helpful and gave me good ideas on how to tryout the new pieces.

My next project will be to try a V+ top on my .525 bore hone.  If you can, give them a fair try and know that you may have picked up some useless habits and may need to replace them with others.

Tanks to all who posted here,
John Tarr
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« Reply #96 on: Jan 08, 2018, 12:45PM »

Totally blown away....... Thank you to the folk on here for bringing Antonios work to our attention and congratulations on an amazing product  Sing it!

Chris this is not the first time we've heard this!  :)
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« Reply #97 on: Jan 08, 2018, 02:24PM »

Chris this is not the first time we've heard this!  :)


Ahh ! He just gets very keen..... on occasions.....

Chris Stearn
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« Reply #98 on: Jan 08, 2018, 02:59PM »

Ahh ! He just gets very keen..... on occasions.....

Chris Stearn

Still loving it  Pant :D
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« Reply #99 on: Jan 08, 2018, 03:13PM »

How does it work with the Inderbinen trombone? Evil Evil

(Note to self: wish I had remembered this for the kid who had the scholarship to buy a new trombone.)
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« Reply #100 on: Jan 09, 2018, 03:16AM »

How does it work with the Inderbinen trombone? Evil Evil



That is so not funny....... I hope you are happy Herr Guttman  Yeah, RIGHT.
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« Reply #101 on: Jan 09, 2018, 09:02AM »

Whatever happened to der Inderbinen? Seriously. I recall when the Inderbinen was Jesusís own trombone. What are you on now Chris?
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« Reply #102 on: Jan 09, 2018, 09:32AM »

Luke had sent me one of these a few months back when they were just gaining a foothold here in the US.  I really liked the piece, but felt a bit constricted in terms of how I wanted to color the sound.  Sure the mouthpiece locked me into pitch and partial easily, but I'd rather do a bit of extra work to get there if it meant I had more control over how the sound was colored.  I feel that's an integral and unique role of trombone - being able to change colors to blend with saxes and high brass.

Anyway, yesterday I was sitting next to a colleague during a rehearsal, and he had an AR similar to the one I had tried from Luke (except with a V+ cup and different backbore).  I put it in my horn for a few tunes and WOW!  All of the positives I remembered about the piece were there, but everything felt loose - the slots were looser, and I was able to more or less make the sound I wanted without being as locked in.   

I still have a few variables I'd like to change, but I was really impressed! 

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« Reply #103 on: Jan 09, 2018, 09:39PM »

Luke had sent me one of these a few months back when they were just gaining a foothold here in the US.  I really liked the piece, but felt a bit constricted in terms of how I wanted to color the sound.  Sure the mouthpiece locked me into pitch and partial easily, but I'd rather do a bit of extra work to get there if it meant I had more control over how the sound was colored.  I feel that's an integral and unique role of trombone - being able to change colors to blend with saxes and high brass.

Anyway, yesterday I was sitting next to a colleague during a rehearsal, and he had an AR similar to the one I had tried from Luke (except with a V+ cup and different backbore).  I put it in my horn for a few tunes and WOW!  All of the positives I remembered about the piece were there, but everything felt loose - the slots were looser, and I was able to more or less make the sound I wanted without being as locked in.   

I still have a few variables I'd like to change, but I was really impressed! 

I was "the colleague." And I have been impressed by it as well. Still on the fence about it...not quite aggressive enough in terms of brilliance of attacks...but I went back to my Minick "11C/7C on steroids" tonight (about 15 years and counting as my big band lead/solo m'pce of choice) in performance with the same band as the one to which one ntap refers above, and it was just too...unreliable...compared to the AR I've been trying.
 
Too "picky/choosy"in the registers above G4. (  )

Is there an available compromise? Do I just need to keep playing the AR until I adjust to it?

I really don't know.

Stay tuned.

S.

P.S. When ntap played it, he sounded wonderful. But he sounds great on almost everything.

P.P.S. This AR m'pce is the first one I've tried that really tempts me to pay the dues to make the switch on my .500 bore Shires lead/solo horn.

Let us pray...
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« Reply #104 on: Jan 10, 2018, 02:05AM »

I was "the colleague." And I have been impressed by it as well. Still on the fence about it...not quite aggressive enough in terms of brilliance of attacks...but I went back to my Minick "11C/7C on steroids" tonight (about 15 years and counting as my big band lead/solo m'pce of choice) in performance with the same band as the one to which one ntap refers above, and it was just too...unreliable...compared to the AR I've been trying.
 
Too "picky/choosy"in the registers above G4. ( )

Is there an available compromise? Do I just need to keep playing the AR until I adjust to it?

I really don't know.


Stay tuned.

S.

P.S. When ntap played it, he sounded wonderful. But he sounds great on almost everything.

P.P.S. This AR m'pce is the first one I've tried that really tempts me to pay the dues to make the switch on my .500 bore Shires lead/solo horn.

Let us pray...

Sam, what rim and backbore specs are you talking about here? Iíve tried a V+ cup with the 25.4mm rim and it wasnít quite right on my .525 Edwards, and didnít really feel like a lead piece on my .508 either. Iíve got the standard cup 24.8mm rim too which I like but it lacks a bit of fullness to the sound compared to my Reeves 11c. But perhaps I just need to spend some more time on it.

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« Reply #105 on: Jan 10, 2018, 06:36AM »

The beauty of the AR design is how much the backbore change will affect the blow/sound/feel of a piece. You can make it more stable or looser depending on what you use. Now with the addition of the V+ cup we have even more possibilities and should be able to fit most players needs. For me I find that with the AR pieces I donít think that I have to compromise to gain the benefits of the piece. Itís all about finding the right match for the player and instrument. Iím always happy to answer any questions and provide my opinion. Iíve now worked with enough players trying these out that I have a good idea about what will and what wonít work for someone. All the best!
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« Reply #106 on: Jan 10, 2018, 09:11AM »

Sam, what rim and backbore specs are you talking about here?

25.40 60 V+ cup, 60 43 10 5 shank.

Quote
Iíve tried a V+ cup with the 25.4mm rim and it wasnít quite right on my .525 Edwards, and didnít really feel like a lead piece on my .508 either. Iíve got the standard cup 24.8mm rim too which I like but it lacks a bit of fullness to the sound compared to my Reeves 11c. But perhaps I just need to spend some more time on it.

I tried that above V+ combo on my .525 and .508 for short time also. Initial results? It felt good on the .525, not so good on he .508. Go figure.

It's all a mystery as far as I am concerned. I just keep trying stuff and keep what works.

Later...

S.


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« Reply #107 on: Jan 11, 2018, 08:35PM »

I was "the colleague." And I have been impressed by it as well. Still on the fence about it...not quite aggressive enough in terms of brilliance of attacks...but I went back to my Minick "11C/7C on steroids" tonight (about 15 years and counting as my big band lead/solo m'pce of choice) in performance with the same band as the one to which one ntap refers above, and it was just too...unreliable...compared to the AR I've been trying.
 
Too "picky/choosy"in the registers above G4. (  )

Is there an available compromise? Do I just need to keep playing the AR until I adjust to it?

I really don't know.

Stay tuned.

S.

P.S. When ntap played it, he sounded wonderful. But he sounds great on almost everything.

You're kind Sam - anytime I can sit next to you I consider myself very lucky, and think the same of you. Whether you're on your 11C, Minick, or the AR I still feel that way!

It's always a question for me: comfort vs sound and response.  They aren't mutually exclusive; sometimes the more comfortable you are, the easier you can control and adapt.  But sometimes what's comfortable doesn't give you the best sound/response.  It's such a balancing act!  I played an 11C for over a year, because I found a piece that worked so well with my horn.  Ultimately, I've moved on to a Mt Vernon 6.5A - it's very similar to the 11C I was playing, but just a tad more comfortable. 

Anyway, that AR felt good, and sounded good too!
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« Reply #108 on: Jan 12, 2018, 02:41PM »

I was really happy with a 25.4 C top with the 43 bottom until I tried the V+ with the 46 bottom. My original plan was to try the V+ on my .525 bore horn but it was too restrictive. Just for fun, I put it into my .500 horn and bam, that was it.

It seemed nearly as easy in the high register as the C but with much better sound (for my ears) and the ability color the sound, as Sam mentioned. The main thing that I need to work with now is using much less effort than before. I used to wince at intervals that landed on a high ďgĒ but now it just pops out like never before, as long as I donít wince and struggle. Being that I mainly work as a Feldenkrais teacher, my effort levels are very important and this mouthpiece is helping me find much more ease than Iíve ever felt, even though I studied music.

Luke has been very helpful as well.

My next step is to order a V+ with the 65 bottom for the .525 horn.
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« Reply #109 on: Jan 13, 2018, 01:17AM »

You're kind Sam - anytime I can sit next to you I consider myself very lucky, and think the same of you. Whether you're on your 11C, Minick, or the AR I still feel that way!

It's always a question for me: comfort vs sound and response.  They aren't mutually exclusive; sometimes the more comfortable you are, the easier you can control and adapt.  But sometimes what's comfortable doesn't give you the best sound/response.  It's such a balancing act!  I played an 11C for over a year, because I found a piece that worked so well with my horn.  Ultimately, I've moved on to a Mt Vernon 6.5A - it's very similar to the 11C I was playing, but just a tad more comfortable. 

Anyway, that AR felt good, and sounded good too!

Not so much "kind" as truthful, Nick. And I sound quite different...at least to my ears...on those three m'pces you mention with my .500 Shires. Different shifts and different timbres through the ranges.

About the 11C/6.5-ish thing. I have always felt that 11Cs and 6.5s...especially 6.5As and even more especially with Mt.Vernon/NY examples...are just different sizes of the same m'pce. Ditto w/12Cs and 7Cs. It's just a matter of rim size/contour and where the shifts need to happen through say 3 octaves. The 12C/7C thing is brighter and more aggressive sounding; the 11C/6.5 thing is darker and fuller sounding. Less aggressive attacks, also. More flexible as well.

Anyway...

About the AR and chops in general. You may remember that I had a spring problem last week on my .500 spit valve, but I was too busy to get it fixed so I jury rigged a piece of cardboard and some rubber bands until I could get it to Terry Pierce. I dropped it off at Terry's a couple of days ago, but since I am still in the middle of trying to figure out how to play that AR m'pce and I had a few days off, I put the AR m'pce into my .508 horn...on which I usually play a Mt. Vernon 6.5A...and practiced extensively for a couple of days. It felt...and especially sounded...not so good (Sigh...), but I soldiered on. The first day it just wasn't working, but I continued playing it the second day. After several hours I was about to give up on that m'pce/horn combination. I put it down and did some other stuff for a few hours and then I picked it up again. Surprise!!! It suddenly sounded and felt really good!!!

The soft machine figured it out.

Duh.

It felt like another m'pce!!!

On a desert island with only one horn and one m'pce? Maybe even not so good? Robinson Crusoe style? We'd figure it out eventually.

Duh twice!!!

Later...

S.
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