Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length

 
Advanced search

1097026 Posts in 72562 Topics- by 19541 Members - Latest Member: Zorgnot
Jump to:  
Pages: [1] 2  All   Go Down
Print
Author Topic: Jazz trombone for concert band  (Read 2778 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Hmb
*
Offline Offline

Location:
Joined: Jul 6, 2017
Posts: 5

View Profile
« on: Jul 23, 2017, 02:21PM »

I'm thinking about purchasing a jazz Bb tenor trombone, which I would play in the pep band, jazz band, and concert band at high school and through college.
Would a jazz trombone be appropriate for a concert band or should I stick to my Yamaha student trombone for that?
Logged
Full Pedal Trombonist

*
Offline Offline

Location:
Joined: Jun 16, 2009
Posts: 3042

View Profile
« Reply #1 on: Jul 23, 2017, 02:57PM »

A concert band? Sure.

A serious wind band? Probably not.

It really depends on your college. How do they do things?
Logged

We don't just embrace insanity here, we feel it up, french kiss it and then buy it a drink.
Andrew Meronek

*
Offline Offline

Location: Livonia, MI
Joined: Sep 30, 2001
Posts: 7000
"Justly Intoned"


View Profile
« Reply #2 on: Jul 23, 2017, 07:00PM »

In high school, absolutely. Even in college, a jazz horn can be used on concert band kinds of stuff, but there is depends more on the literature, whether the 1st trombone needs to be lighter or heavier. IMHO it can be used a lot more than it typically is in college. Bigger is not always better, even for "serious" stuff. If you end up on 2nd trombone, it actually matters even less. 2nd parts are much more about your ears than your equipment.

So are the other parts, speaking of.
Logged

"All musicians are subconsciously mathematicians."

- Thelonious Monk
Le.Tromboniste
*
Offline Offline

Location: Basel, Switzerland
Joined: Aug 5, 2008
Posts: 448

View Profile
« Reply #3 on: Jul 23, 2017, 10:07PM »

If it's between buying a new horn and sticking to a Yamaha student horn.... What's the question? The most appropriate horn will be the one that plays/sounds best. Between a Yamaha 354 (i.e .500 bore) and a so-called Jazz horn aka just a small bore horn, +/-500... The Yamaha isn't made more appropriate by its size, and will be of lesser quality.
Logged

Maximilien Brisson
Le.Tromboniste
*
Offline Offline

Location: Basel, Switzerland
Joined: Aug 5, 2008
Posts: 448

View Profile
« Reply #4 on: Jul 23, 2017, 10:13PM »

Now if your Yamaha is a 356,might be a different question. The larger bore might make you blend with the others better even  though it won't play as nice as your new horn (plus having a trigger does help in a lot of advanced concert band pieces). But you'll want a good small bore horn in college no matter what.
Logged

Maximilien Brisson
Matt K

*
*
Offline Offline

Location:
Joined: May 6, 2010
Posts: 7412

View Profile
« Reply #5 on: Jul 24, 2017, 03:49AM »

Ysk 645, 646, or 630 would be better probably ly. Medium bore. Jack of all trades type deal where you could use it for everything. Esp. As an amateur
Logged

What's in a name? that which we call a tenor-bass posaune
By any other name would smell as sweet;
Radar

*
Offline Offline

Location: Rochester NY
Joined: Feb 23, 2012
Posts: 763

View Profile
« Reply #6 on: Jul 24, 2017, 05:43AM »

I know a few good Jazz players who are playing lead (and small Combo work) on what would be considered a student horn. If your student horn is in good condition and plays well you might want to consider using that as your jazz horn, and getting a Medium or Large bore horn for college concert band.  Even though you may be playing lead now in high school you might find yourself playing second or 3rd parts in College concert band.   
Logged
davdud101
The Kid

*
Offline Offline

Location: Detroit, MI
Joined: Jun 20, 2014
Posts: 1141
"Put yourself in the shoes of the listener."


View Profile WWW
« Reply #7 on: Jul 25, 2017, 11:21AM »

i just wanna be sure... when folks refer to a 'jazz horn', it just means 'small bore', right? I mean, there are plenty of groups/styles of NON-jazz music where small bore can fit, as well as many opportunities for a "classical" horn to perform in a jazz environment.

Little with semantics I guess
Logged

Don't practice until you get it right.
Practice until you can't get it wrong.
BGuttman
Mad Chemist

*
*
Offline Offline

Location: Londonderry, NH, USA
Joined: Dec 12, 2000
Posts: 51734
"Almost Professional"


View Profile
« Reply #8 on: Jul 25, 2017, 11:32AM »

I can't read the OP's mind, but I think he's talking about smaller bore trombones.  I've played 1st in my community band with anything from a King 2B to a Bach 36 (and larger).  Depends on how snooty the people in the band are.

Yes, I've used some small bores in Orchestra as well.  Sometimes a smaller horn blends better when you are trying to be a bridge to the French Horns.
Logged

Bruce Guttman
Solo Trombone, Hollis Town Band
Merrimack Valley Philharmonic Orch. President 2017-2018
Le.Tromboniste
*
Offline Offline

Location: Basel, Switzerland
Joined: Aug 5, 2008
Posts: 448

View Profile
« Reply #9 on: Jul 25, 2017, 11:51AM »

Yes, I've used some small bores in Orchestra as well.  Sometimes a smaller horn blends better when you are trying to be a bridge to the French Horns.

This!!!

Who exactly decided we had to play a large bore on 1st, lest we be called wimps?

I used to have a silver plated 1951 6H (which I regretted selling the minute I sold it...). I sold it to a guy who was studying at the college where I was rehearsing, so instead of bringing my 42, one day, I brought the 6H for him and played the rehearsal on it. My section was very skeptical, until we started playing (Rachmaninoff Symphony no. 2). It was the nicest blend and color palette we had in any of that program's rehearsals. Very eye-opening
Logged

Maximilien Brisson
BGuttman
Mad Chemist

*
*
Offline Offline

Location: Londonderry, NH, USA
Joined: Dec 12, 2000
Posts: 51734
"Almost Professional"


View Profile
« Reply #10 on: Jul 25, 2017, 12:09PM »

I think the same guy (it was probably a guy; I can't imagine a gal doing this) who decided that the only "real" French Horn was a double in F-Bb decided that the only "real" trombone had an F-attachment.  I say fie on him!!

I especially like small bores for intimate ensembles and French rep with only one trombone.  My Bach 36 with its F attachment is good, but a smaller horn like a King 3B-F or Olds Recording with F might even be better.
Logged

Bruce Guttman
Solo Trombone, Hollis Town Band
Merrimack Valley Philharmonic Orch. President 2017-2018
BillO
A trombone is not measured by it's name.

*
Offline Offline

Location: Ontario Canada
Joined: Jun 24, 2015
Posts: 3621

View Profile
« Reply #11 on: Jul 25, 2017, 02:17PM »

100 years ago everyone played small bore trombones.
Logged

Never look at the conductor. You just encourage them.

Have you noticed, some folk never stick around to help tidy up after practice?
BillO
A trombone is not measured by it's name.

*
Offline Offline

Location: Ontario Canada
Joined: Jun 24, 2015
Posts: 3621

View Profile
« Reply #12 on: Jul 25, 2017, 02:19PM »

100 years ago everyone played small bore trombones.
If your Yamaha is a YSL-354, it's fine for all those things you mentioned.  No need to buy another horn at all.
Logged

Never look at the conductor. You just encourage them.

Have you noticed, some folk never stick around to help tidy up after practice?
Woolworth

*
Offline Offline

Location: Monticello, Wisconsin
Joined: Mar 17, 2002
Posts: 3847

View Profile
« Reply #13 on: Jul 25, 2017, 03:33PM »

"Trombones don't play jazz; people play jazz."

For two years in my university symphonic band, all the tenor trombone players used .525 and .547 instruments, except the section principal, who played circles around everyone on his King 2B.  He was also principal in the university orchestra, using the same instrument.
Logged

Rich Woolworth
Trombonist, Composer, Arranger, Clinician, Bandleader

www.matrixmusic.com
heinz gries

*
Offline Offline

Location: heidelberg/germany
Joined: Mar 15, 2004
Posts: 653

View Profile
« Reply #14 on: Jul 26, 2017, 02:05AM »

"Trombones don't play jazz; people play jazz."
Good!
Logged

T.Mittag custom alto
Helmut Voigt alto with modified 36 Bach slide,brassark copper leadpipe
Conn 34H alto in D
Courtois alto
Bach LT6,gold plated,Hoelle copper tuningslide.
Getzen Super deluxe silver plated,copper rim bell
Getzen 3508R
leec

*
Offline Offline

Location: Huntsville Ontario
Joined: Jul 12, 2015
Posts: 175

View Profile
« Reply #15 on: Aug 17, 2017, 03:04PM »

If your Yamaha is a YSL-354, it's fine for all those things you mentioned.  No need to buy another horn at all.
Come on Bill, what has 'need' got to do with it?  Playing with my new Stork Custom T3 mp.  Ebay for $10 Cdn!
Logged
BillO
A trombone is not measured by it's name.

*
Offline Offline

Location: Ontario Canada
Joined: Jun 24, 2015
Posts: 3621

View Profile
« Reply #16 on: Aug 17, 2017, 03:41PM »

Come on Bill, what has 'need' got to do with it?  Playing with my new Stork Custom T3 mp.  Ebay for $10 Cdn!
We need to be able to by trombone stuff without having a need to.

Good price!
Logged

Never look at the conductor. You just encourage them.

Have you noticed, some folk never stick around to help tidy up after practice?
paulyg
*
Offline Offline

Location:
Joined: Feb 14, 2012
Posts: 273

View Profile
« Reply #17 on: Aug 18, 2017, 10:29AM »

The first trombone parts in most college-level concert band music have more in common with orchestra 2nd-3rd trombone parts than lead jazz bone parts. If I had to pick 'one horn to rule them all' for college (which I pretty much have with the exception of using a different beater) I'd go with a medium or large bore w/ an f-attachment. If you're planning on seriously gigging with a jazz band then you'll probably wear yourself out playing lead on long sets with a large bore, but if you're gonna try and cover a part on say, a Maslanka symphony for wind band, you're gonna have a bad time playing it on an instrument built for jazz.
Logged
DaveAshley

*
Offline Offline

Location: Lexington, Kentucky - Usually at sea
Joined: Jun 14, 2005
Posts: 2539

View Profile
« Reply #18 on: Aug 18, 2017, 12:06PM »

The Yamaha 354 IS a great "jazz Bb" trombone. "Student" label be damned!  Max Acree, who I consider to be an up-and-coming giant in modern jazz trombone, plays one exclusively!
You might think about a larger bore. Then you'll have everything covered.
Logged

BillO
A trombone is not measured by it's name.

*
Offline Offline

Location: Ontario Canada
Joined: Jun 24, 2015
Posts: 3621

View Profile
« Reply #19 on: Aug 18, 2017, 03:46PM »

If you're planning on seriously gigging with a jazz band then you'll probably wear yourself out playing lead on long sets with a large bore
Yeah that will happen. Many moons ago I found myself in 1st chair and all I had for a horn was a King 4B.  After 6 months my chops got used to it aided by a drop down from a 4G TO 6.5AL.  It was strenuous at fist, even with the smaller mouthpiece.
Logged

Never look at the conductor. You just encourage them.

Have you noticed, some folk never stick around to help tidy up after practice?
Pages: [1] 2  All   Go Up
Print
Jump to: