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Author Topic: Picking up a trombone after 28 years!  (Read 1072 times)
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demaxx1
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« on: Aug 01, 2017, 12:47PM »

Hi Guys, I have been lurking around the forum now for a few weeks. I recently picked me up a tenor trombone with an F attachment similar to what I used to play. I started playing trombone in the 8th grade. I played both concert and marching band through high school. I had a private teacher my Jr. and senior years. Then took music my first two years in college. At the same time I split time playing with a gospel/jazz band. I know how does gospel and jazz go together?  But it worked wonderfully! Then I took a real job and the trombone just become a dust collector in the corner which I later sold.

I for some reason kept the lip drills that me and my private teacher used to go through. Lots of scales and arpeggios. I figured that would be the best place for me to start.If you have other ideas I would gladly listen.

I have noticed something, I have a beard and mustache now. My wife does not want me to shave it off. It seems to be giving me some issues.I press to hard to get a good seal, and that seems to keep me from hitting lower notes well. When I loosen up the pressure to what I remember, I don't get a good seal and can't get a good tone on anything. Suggestions on how to keep the beard and stache, and still get a nice seal would be appreciated. Thanks in advance guys. 
« Last Edit: Aug 01, 2017, 04:57PM by demaxx1 » Logged
BGuttman
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« Reply #1 on: Aug 01, 2017, 12:50PM »

Can you slip the mouthpiece under the stache?  That's what I do.
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LowrBrass

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« Reply #2 on: Aug 01, 2017, 03:52PM »

A buddy of mine grew a mustache, and after finding himself in your situation, he decided he didn't really need his low register.
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gregs70

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« Reply #3 on: Aug 02, 2017, 07:46PM »

Welcome back, man!  I have played with a 'stach and soul patch for most of my adult life.  Never an issue.  When I shaved it off a few years back, no real change in my playing.  When I grew it back, it felt off for a few weeks than I was back to normal.
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demaxx1
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« Reply #4 on: Aug 02, 2017, 08:10PM »

Welcome back, man!  I have played with a 'stach and soul patch for most of my adult life.  Never an issue.  When I shaved it off a few years back, no real change in my playing.  When I grew it back, it felt off for a few weeks than I was back to normal.

Thanks! My stache and beard are really stiff hair. It feels like it is pricking my lips when I play. I may try to trim it so that it is above my lip, and keep practicing.
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Geezerhorn

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« Reply #5 on: Aug 03, 2017, 03:46AM »

I have a worn spot on my soup strainer on one side of my upper chops, so I trim the other side to match. I never liked to let it grow long to where I would have to brush it off to the sides. I don't like to eat hair.  :(

My full and luxurious beard never enters into the party.

My long, golden locks never get in the way.

My muscles that ripple and gleam in the sunshine help me support the horn.

When I flash a smile, a ray of light sparkles on my teeth and people hear a "ding".

I was "off" for 45 years. Now when I play high, very very high, it sounds like a fine thread of gold woven into a silken fabric. And when I play low, very very low, the men sigh & the ladies cry.

...Geezer
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Russ White

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« Reply #6 on: Aug 03, 2017, 04:14AM »

Long Tones. Hours and hours and hours of long tones. When I came back to the horn after about the same layoff you have had, I had a teacher tell me the best thing I could do would be to not play anything at all but long tones until I could hold a tuner dead solid on pitch for an hour. He was being just a bit hyperbolic, but it was really good advice. Make it a major part of your re-immersion program. It will help everything else.
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« Reply #7 on: Aug 03, 2017, 04:37AM »

After a similar layoff, I found that more short practice sessions brought my chops back more quickly than anything.  I also found a good teacher as soon as I got the horn, and started with lessons right away.  Good Luck

Ray
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Pre59

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« Reply #8 on: Aug 03, 2017, 05:08AM »


My full and luxurious beard never enters into the party.

My long, golden locks never get in the way.

My muscles that ripple and gleam in the sunshine help me support the horn.

When I flash a smile, a ray of light sparkles on my teeth and people hear a "ding".

I was "off" for 45 years. Now when I play high, very very high, it sounds like a fine thread of gold woven into a silken fabric. And when I play low, very very low, the men sigh & the ladies cry.

...Geezer

Keep taking those tablets!...  :)
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Geezerhorn

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« Reply #9 on: Aug 03, 2017, 05:13AM »

Keep taking those tablets!...  :)

Lol. AND having those dreams!

I know the OP didn't really ask for this kind of advice, but it seems required on this Forum. lol   Slurs; slow at first and increasing the speed/complexity of them. Concentrate on absolutely no visible motion in the chopal area!

...Geezer
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JimArcher

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« Reply #10 on: Aug 03, 2017, 06:39AM »

My gap was 42 years.  I restarted in 1999, since then I've always had a 'stash & beard, never did anything to adapt, never had a problem
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demaxx1
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« Reply #11 on: Aug 08, 2017, 08:52PM »

My gap was 42 years.  I restarted in 1999, since then I've always had a 'stash & beard, never did anything to adapt, never had a problem

 Good!
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Geezerhorn

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« Reply #12 on: Aug 10, 2017, 06:01AM »

Sorry guys, but I still have you all beat at 45 years!

...Geezer
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demaxx1
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« Reply #13 on: Aug 11, 2017, 03:44PM »

Sorry guys, but I still have you all beat at 45 years!

...Geezer

 Good!
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billepstein

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« Reply #14 on: Aug 14, 2017, 09:09AM »

I first grew my moustache at age three. Yeah, RIGHT.

Snagged some pretty good gigs with it on my face over the next 40 odd years, then quit playing.

Coming back now at age 70 I found that:
A: Moustache had to go
B: Conventional wisdom slurs, slurs, slurs were good for muscles but death on regaining tone and intonation. Attack! Attack! my teacher used to holler. He was right. Now I play each Remington warm-up twice, slurred and attacked.
C: Don't know when, if ever, I'll unconsciously hit THAT note again. So many 'A's come out as Kazoo 'E's and vice-versa. 
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« Reply #15 on: Aug 14, 2017, 10:47AM »

It was 35 for me. In addition to all the advice in this thread, I'd also suggest that you get a book of easy to intermediate jazz solos and a book of Rochut etudes to rebuild your sense of melody. Long tones, intervals, etc. are fine, but our goal is to make music.

Enjoy the ride1

Joel
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Geezerhorn

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« Reply #16 on: Aug 14, 2017, 11:08AM »

It was 35 for me. In addition to all the advice in this thread, I'd also suggest that you get a book of easy to intermediate jazz solos and a book of Rochut etudes to rebuild your sense of melody. Long tones, intervals, etc. are fine, but our goal is to make music.

Enjoy the ride1

Joel

 Good!

I think that is great advice, but there are a lot of "symphonicos" who think "jazz" is a four-letter word. And there are a lot of "jazzers" who might think that Rochut or etude is a four-letter word. But your advice to practice being musical - regardless of whatever genre you are fond of - is sound. Actually, I believe that even the most basic exercise ought to be practiced as musically as possible.  Clever

...Geezer
« Last Edit: Aug 15, 2017, 04:09AM by Geezerhorn » Logged

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