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Author Topic: German Trombone Mouthpiece  (Read 640 times)
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snieckarz
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« on: Aug 02, 2017, 04:01PM »

Hello all,

I recently aquired a German-style tenor trombone and I am looking for advice in purchasing a German mouthpiece that will work with the instrument. I currently play on a Giardinelli SYM-G/Bach 4G. I want to stay authentic and get a German mouthpiece, nothing American. Thanks!
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NBee

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« Reply #1 on: Aug 02, 2017, 04:13PM »

What make is the trombone? I have an 1850's Penzel that take a standard large shank mouthpiece. I know someone who has a Robert Schopper and taken a small shank. There are other examples that have their own tapers.

My point is German Posaunen didn't have a standard bore size or mouthpiece receiver. Hell, a lot of then didn't even have leadpipes. So knowing the make will help.
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Bach Mount Vernon 34 (1954): XT N103G, XT C+, D2 Alto
Bach 42GT (1988): XT N104G, XT HC, H8, XT 104G, XT G+, G+9
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scharnhorst
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« Reply #2 on: Aug 02, 2017, 05:25PM »

http://www.schmidt-brass.de/
Contact Schmidt brass.
I have an old Monke trombone, not a small shank and even denis wick medium shank did not fit right. Schmidt knows perfect match.
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Le.Tromboniste
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« Reply #3 on: Aug 03, 2017, 12:13PM »

Schmidt, or keep your eyes open on German eBay for batches of old mouthpieces.
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Maximilien Brisson
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« Reply #4 on: Aug 03, 2017, 02:45PM »

Kölner is the key term you want to look for, generally speaking. Schmidt is whom I would suggest, too.
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« Reply #5 on: Aug 03, 2017, 03:43PM »

Another nod to Schmidt! Fine pieces, which work well in German instruments. (Very different to American mouthpieces, but that's the point, right?)

M
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Matthew Walker
Bass Trombonist, Opera Australia 1991-2006
Greenhoe Custom Trombones, Technician, Artist, Designer. 2006-2012
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Owner, M&W Custom Trombones. LLC. 2015-
Le.Tromboniste
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« Reply #6 on: Aug 03, 2017, 04:19PM »

Kölner is the key term you want to look for, generally speaking. Schmidt is whom I would suggest, too.

Strangely, with JK, the "Cologne" series is their Jazz line
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Maximilien Brisson
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« Reply #7 on: Aug 03, 2017, 08:41PM »

Strangely, with JK, the "Cologne" series is their Jazz line

Ha, interesting choice. I use Schmidt's Bambula series (along with the original that accompanied the instrument) with my Scherzer and find them to work well. They apparently have a new line based on Weschke's mouthpiece, which would probably be great, too.
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Tim Dowling

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« Reply #8 on: Aug 04, 2017, 10:23PM »

Another thumbs up for Schmidt. The Bambula series really liven up a German trombone. For the OP I would recommend the Bambula model 4 1/2. I have several in evry possible shank size. German trombones are very inconsistant.
the Solist series is the "Kölner" form. Which is the traditonal German style mouthpiece that Vincent Bach based his earliest designs.
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Tim Dowling
Residentie Orchestra, The Hague
Royal Conservatory, The Hague
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