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Author Topic: Sizing  (Read 1435 times)
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svenlarsson

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« Reply #20 on: Aug 07, 2017, 03:22AM »

Well David was tought strange ideas about breathing, as I was to, with a big push out from the belly.
Now it is generally admitted that is not the best way to inhale.
 
About blowing David use the whole body, both bell and ribs.

Many students try to blow only by squizing the ribs.

They have to learn how to use even the bottom for a good blow.

Davids way work. I like Cauld Gordons "keep the chest high at all times" method.

The important thing is to learn a good blow.
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Kanstul 1662. Bach 45B. Kanstul 1555. Besson Euphonium. Kanstul 66-S Tuba. Sackbuts in F/E/Eb Bb/A
And several horns I should sell.
BillO
A trombone is not measured by it's name.

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« Reply #21 on: Aug 07, 2017, 09:59AM »

Sorry to interject here but having been working on David Vining's breathing book this is exactly the opposite of what he says.

As he says your air doesn't go below your diaphragm.
I guess he's welcome to his opinion on this.  Yes, I know the diaphragm sits between the lungs and the stomach, but as you extend the diaphragm and chest to inhale air and create a large air supply/cavity, the sensation is very much felt in you stomach.  If you're not continually breathing that way you are leaving air volume on the table and it wont be there when you need it.

I have listened to many beginners try to extend a note by reducing their air supply only to produce a thin and vague sound when they breath using only their chest.  Just not enough air to get the job done.

I'm not saying you just use the belly, but you don't not use it either.  The sensation is there when you use the chest and belly.  Using the belly alone would be just ... er ... dumb.  Not to mention uncomfortable and difficult to accomplish.
 
I'm no David Vinning, but I know what works for me ... and many others.
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Matt K

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« Reply #22 on: Aug 07, 2017, 11:00AM »

Quote
I'm no David Vinning, but I know what works for me ... and many others.

Maybe!  Its easy to assume you do but unless you've been formally trained in the physiology of breathing, that you may not be doing it right (or that something incidentally works for others, or at least gives the perception that it does). Breathing pedagogy is a major component of most music ed programs; I even had to take a breathing proficiency, diagnosing common problems that most students will face --- and those habits don't die when you become an adult.

Part of Vining's pedagogy, or at least what he mentioned when he did a masterclass at my school, was creating an accurate "body map" -- that is, knowing what is actually inside of your body.  He very strongly cautioned against using metaphors that created anti-body maps or things that were physiologically impossible - such as breathing through your toes.  Its an understandable shorthand, but given the plethora options out there for showing students what actually happens, there isn't much of a reason to substitute and students can easily overcompensate, attempting to follow imprecise instructions. 
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HeyPauly
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« Reply #23 on: Aug 07, 2017, 05:23PM »

Thanks for all the replies. Lots of food for thought.

Practice.  In fact, to open up the embouchure I might suggest a LARGER mouthpiece.  Bach sizes there are a little odd.  I might suggest a Schilke/Yamaha 47.  Larger than a 12C/7C but smaller than a 6.5AL.

You were right about a larger mouthpiece. I got my hands on a 6.5AL and it is quite different. Going to need to spend some time adjusting to it. Of course the most important thing is to practice.
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