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Author Topic: Leadpipes  (Read 829 times)
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fleanutbutter
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« on: Aug 08, 2017, 05:36AM »

I recently bought a Wessex Supertenor horn that comes with three leadpipes.  I played it a bit last night and everything seemed to go pretty well using the leadpipe that is currently in the instrument.  I've never had a trombone with interchangeable leadpipes so I don't really know when to change them, how hard it is, and what the effect could be.  I've read that they change the resistance in the horn but I'm not sure what that necessarily has to do with anything important.  Is there a primer somewhere on leadpipes?  I searched the forum but didn't find anything that looked promising.  Perhaps one of the more experienced folks on the forum has some advice and is willing to share it?

I also noticed that the mouthpiece fits pretty loosely in the receiver - to the point I'm afraid it may actually fall out.  I've never run into that before - is that normal for a large bore horn?
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JimArcher

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« Reply #1 on: Aug 08, 2017, 06:04AM »

Many years ago I got an Edwards slide to use with my Bach Bass (they fit, same threads). The 'new' slide came with three 'pipes, I tried all three over a couple of months, finally picked one that seemed to work the best. 
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Jim Archer, an old, old Olds fan
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beansessette

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« Reply #2 on: Aug 08, 2017, 06:11AM »

As with any modification or addition to your instrument, a different leadpipe will make some things easier and some things harder. Find someone with a good set of ears and play for them using all three leadpipes so you can get a second opinion on which one helps you sound your best.
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Geezerhorn

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« Reply #3 on: Aug 08, 2017, 06:24AM »

If you are rock-solid on a given mouthpiece, all well and good!

However, I think what complicates things - at least for me - is: okay, I like this lead pipe with this mouthpiece but would this other mouthpiece work any better? Or would a different mouthpiece then make a different lead pipe better. That gets tricky.

...Geezer
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harrison.t.reed
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« Reply #4 on: Aug 08, 2017, 06:56AM »

The mouthpiece wobble -- are you using the mouthpiece that looks like the Gemini space capsule that came with the trombone?

I believe that horn takes a proprietary mouthpiece.

As for leadpipes, you need to experiment with the ones it came with. Sometimes leadpipes do the opposite of what you'd think they would do. You would think a really open pipe would offer less resistance, but at least on one horn I've got, the most open pipe is the only way to feel resistance at all.
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fleanutbutter
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« Reply #5 on: Aug 09, 2017, 11:49AM »

Thanks for the advice.

Yes I am using the "Gemini capsule" mouthpiece that came with it.  I wouldn't say it's wobbling but my experience with mouthpieces (limited and about 30 years old) is that you put them in and give a little twist and they snug up in the receiver.  This one will keep twisting without getting snug.

I boil the other advice down to doing a little experimenting to see which leadpipe works best with the mouthpiece that I have.  Maybe I'll swap them out and play with my teacher to see what he thinks.  If I get a new mouthpiece I can just repeat the leadpipe shuffle and see if a different one ends up on top of the heap.  That way I limit the variables a little. 
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Matt K

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« Reply #6 on: Aug 09, 2017, 11:53AM »

It's probably just smooth. I don't recommend twisting, you may end up either really wedging the leadpipe threads closed or worst case scenario tearing the leadpipe with enough time. Just drop it in. Just don't hold your horn upside down and it'll be fine  ;-)
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Ellrod

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« Reply #7 on: Aug 09, 2017, 12:20PM »

Re: loose mpc.

Try teflon/plumbers tape around the shank. IIRC, Sam Burtis used to advise using teflon tape to adjust the insertion of the mpc to an optimal depth. That was a long time ago.
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Steerpike
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« Reply #8 on: Aug 12, 2017, 10:10PM »

I think that mouthpiece is a Young design. I use one on my Bach 42 in preference to the wick 4al that I used to use.  The Wessex superbone I had a blow on sounded really good.
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sabutin

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« Reply #9 on: Aug 13, 2017, 12:03AM »

Re: loose mpc.

Try teflon/plumbers tape around the shank. IIRC, Sam Burtis used to advise using teflon tape to adjust the insertion of the mpc to an optimal depth. That was a long time ago.

I still do. I suppose it would also work to stop m'pce wobble as well.

S.
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« Reply #10 on: Aug 13, 2017, 01:45AM »

I use 2 leadpipes which are identical in shape but one is brass and the other sterling silver. Having played some quiet duo gigs recently I'm using the silver one, for no other reason that it softens the leading edge of the note a little, but without changing the blow.

To the OP, I'd stay with the one fitted to the horn when new, and use it until you REALLY feel that there's something that you'd like to change. Stay on the same 'piece as well, a box of mouthpieces and 3 leadpipes is the road to madness.. 
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