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Author Topic: What to Do for College?  (Read 5574 times)
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Exzaclee

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« Reply #40 on: Jun 24, 2017, 10:44PM »

Good job Ethan!

Keep grinding at it, you seem driven. That's what your teachers want.

That's what I look for - we don't necessarily look for the best musician on a particular instrument, we look for the hardest worker.

As far as majors, take your time. You might find that majoring in something else suits you better. You might find that you can't do anything but music.

Follow your path. You'll be alright.
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WayneB
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« Reply #41 on: Jul 21, 2017, 06:06AM »

Ethan,
I think Gabe and Bruce are spot on, respectively, in their suggestions. Explore in your youth...embrace the whole you, not just the musician part. And yes, most of the top (public, at least) Universities are not going to ignore a very talented, non-music major instrumentalist in filling a seat in their best ensembles. Nowadays, I hear that "some" of the colleges are using a "curtain" (similar to the pros) at least for the initial on-site placement audition. I could be wrong about this last point.
Now, How about MINORING in music?   

I remember fondly, more so now that he is gone and I get up in years, Frank Crisafulli offering some advice about music as I entered college. (Ed Kleinhammer pretty much echoed the same advice later on.) I was going to major in accounting at the University of Illinois, but the business college at that time did not offer a minor. Frank said "Good, stick with accounting." After I gave him a startled glance, he chuckled, "No, this is not about your ability, it is about some security." Long story short: I ended up majoring in Business Operation Research, a weak Industrial Engineering degree of sorts. I was placed in Harry Begian's top band as his principal bass trombone as a sophomore business major and was tapped for the University's Pit Orchestra. I do recall...and this is way back...that John Daly, former principal at the Denver (now Colorado) symphony was a Psychology major. More recently, I believe he got his PhD in Finance and launched a second career as a business professor.     

I would be interested in other viewpoints here on the forum, but I would venture that the larger public schools (e.g. Indiana U, IU of Michigan, U of Illinois; there are probably a lot of other schools, large and small) might provide more flexibility for non-major instrumentalists whereas the private academies such as Eastman, Cleveland Institute, Julliard, etc. would largely require a music commitment at the point of undergraduate admission.

What I do think is still very important (still now)is the reputation of the trombone teacher(s), at least in presenting your credentials to qualify for an initial professional audition down the line. Realistically, there has to be some screening out, or appropriately "screening in" of candidates, the orchestra committee can not simply hear 500 players. I continued to go to Evanston, IL for lessons, as the Illinois professor was not a fit for me at the time.     

Keep in mind, my now ancient observations pertain to my experiences in the Symphony side of the profession.
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« Reply #42 on: Jul 21, 2017, 10:04AM »

Ethan,

I am going to give you another school to consider that is in Michigan.  Western Michigan, the trombone teacher there is Steve Wolfinbarger.  He is a great teacher.
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« Reply #43 on: Jul 21, 2017, 12:10PM »

Ethan,

I am going to give you another school to consider that is in Michigan.  Western Michigan, the trombone teacher there is Steve Wolfinbarger.  He is a great teacher.
Well, I would but my dad is a chip (he's currently taking online classes on Central Michigan University) which they have a huge rivalry, so not sure how that will turn out for his reaction, but I'll see if I can look into it.

As for major, I think I'll do bass trombone performance since I love playing bass trombone in the bands I'm in.  Or computer engineering which I'm taking AP Computer Science A and MS Office next year. 

 
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Ethan Wadie
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« Reply #44 on: Jul 21, 2017, 01:13PM »

Well, I would but my dad is a chip (he's currently taking online classes on Central Michigan University) which they have a huge rivalry, so not sure how that will turn out for his reaction, but I'll see if I can look into it.

As for major, I think I'll do bass trombone performance since I love playing bass trombone in the bands I'm in.  Or computer engineering which I'm taking AP Computer Science A and MS Office next year. 

 

I'm a WMU and U-M graduate. You wouldn't go wrong at any of the schools you mentioned earlier. People in Michigan (I'm born and raised there) tend to think of WMU and CMU as teacher colleges, which is what they started out to be, but in my estimation most all of the state schools in Michigan that offer a music major (I don't think Lake Superior SU or Michigan Tech offers it) have solid music programs.  I don't know about CMU's engineering programs but WMU's are solid.

Wayne and CMU unfairly get short shrift, but there have been some fine teachers at both schools through the years.
WMU--well, you'll rarely hear me say a bad word about Western ('87, MM Conducting, with trombone study with Russ Brown and Steve Wolfinbarger).  The DOB at WMU, Scott Boerma, is a trombonist as well. Apply yourself here and I promise you won't regret it.
Oakland and Grand Valley, have been up-and-coming for decades.
Ava Ordman will be a demanding teacher, but you'll know your stuff by the time you leave MSU. (can't believe I said something nice about ol' Spartyland Evil)
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WayneB
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« Reply #45 on: Jul 21, 2017, 01:23PM »

Computer Engineering? Then, Illnois and Michigan would be good calls; highly ranked...as are their music schools.  Very hard to get into those Engneering schools, but you know that already, I'm sure, To get considered for the top performance music ensembles there, more often titled Wind Symphony, Symphonic Band, etc. you should just tell them that you are willing to meet the rehearsal requirements when you take an audition for placement. The course description, and thats where the rehearsal time are listed, will state that the course is normally for Music majors, but that does not preclude your acceptance into the ensemble if you are willing to do extra rehearsal time to be in them.
Wayne
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« Reply #46 on: Jul 21, 2017, 01:25PM »

If you want to go down tech, you may also wish to consider something out of the business school too.  The school I went to has a good MIS program (information systems) and leaves you very well rounded.  There is also now a music minor in basically the business of music... and some of the classes count towards both. So you may be able to double dip, get some credit towards the minor just by doing the major.  Something to consider at least.  We did programming in my degree, but mostly focused on applied programming without getting too much into the thickets of lower level languages. Did mostly SQL and C#.
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WayneB
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« Reply #47 on: Jul 21, 2017, 01:48PM »

Yes, teachers at CMU, but also performers...
I often joke about Randy Hawes (Detroit SO Bass, and now Northwestern faculty) going to the "Central Michigan Conservatory of Music." So, the observations about going to WMU, CMU, Mich. State are very, very valid with respect to dedicated teachers. A rap on many of the prestigious academies, such as Eastman, is that you are not guaranteed attention, as in time with the master performing faculty, as the enrollments are actually pretty large.
Michigan has a very fine musical tradition, from grade school up...college directors include Revelli, Begian and Carl Bjerregard, etc.
Yep. you are in a good spot geographically.
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« Reply #48 on: Jul 25, 2017, 10:43PM »

"Do what you love, and you’ll never work another day in your life."

I just completed my first year teaching music in the public school system teaching general music and band K-8. I also teach trombone and euphonium privately to 20 students and am a brass tech at a local high school. Even though I'm always working during my "off" hours.. I really don't feel like I'm working at all because I enjoy teaching music so much.

I graduated high school with a 2.5 GPA and never took lessons before college. I didn't decide until the last semester of my senior year on what I wanted to do for college. I decided on music because I thought, "Well, music is easy! It's the only thing I'm good at anyway." So.. I pursued music education. I got into a program as a "pre-major" and quickly realized that music was hard and I wasn't good at trombone. I almost quit after my third year into the degree because of some poor performances I had. I decided to stick with it and graduated. Every step through the program was hard and looking back I appreciate it all. The failed auditions, the poor performances, the "pre-major" status to begin my collegiate career... it all made me into who I am today. I don't know if I was lucky.. but I personally know I worked really hard to get to teach public school, private students, and marching band.

Music is not an easy path whether it is education or performance.. but I do know that I would much rather "work" all these hours (12-14 hrs per day) and enjoy what I do than do something I don't enjoy. You have to find your passion.. and it might happen at the beginning of your collegiate career or it might not happen until later on. Do something you really enjoy and it will support you financially.

Just my two cents!
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EWadie99
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« Reply #49 on: Jul 31, 2017, 09:42PM »

UPDATE: I'll buy some AP prep books for Calculus BC and Computer Science A and will look over and study over the rest of the summer and before the AP tests.  I'm still thinking about the major but who knows, maybe I'll make the double major idea work out.  Just thought I give a little update.
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Ethan Wadie
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« Reply #50 on: Aug 27, 2017, 07:09PM »

UPDATE: I decided on Oakland University so far for applying.  It's close and I heard the music program there is great and most of my friends who graduated are currently attending there.  If I do well on my AP tests, I'll get 12 credit hours (AP Calculus BC - 8 credit hours, AP Computer Science A - 4 hours) and I'll have most of my required math credits done if things go according to plan.  I'll probably go into Multivariable Calculus (I think it's basically Calculus III) my first semester of college and will take Linear Algebra the next so... I'll have all my required math courses done during my first year of college if things go into place! :D Good!  Also, I think that the double major can still be up for debate, but who knows maybe I'll make it work and will put a lot of work into it if needed.  My majors will be B.A. of Mathematics and Trombone/Bass Trombone Performance.  Just thought I give more of an overview and another update on what I decided!

Thanks all!

Ethan
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