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The Trombone ForumTeaching & LearningPractice Room(Moderator: blast) 12 major scales in 2 octaves in 2 minutes?
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harrison.t.reed
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« Reply #40 on: Aug 12, 2017, 07:21AM »

Whole trombone drop, like it's hot.
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« Reply #41 on: Aug 12, 2017, 07:23AM »

Whole trombone drop, like it's hot.

Do a Jimi Hendrix and set it on fire!

...Geezer
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Alex McMahon
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« Reply #42 on: Aug 12, 2017, 08:16AM »

We do a similar thing where I teach (5-12 band). We do half of that since we introduce it in middle school. By mid/late 8th grade, students are challenged to play 12 majors, one octave no arpeggio, up and down in under a minute. This ties in with teaching key signatures and circle of 4th/5ths. Not all attemp, but those who do are recognized with a t-shirt called the "1260 club." We all practice them slowly and some go on to attempt 1260. I try to get the trombonists to do it chromatically, since it's less bouncing around on the slide and they don't lose time trying to figure out their next scale.

In your case, I'd go for chromatic and decide if you want to do the one octaves first or last so it doesn't stress you out switching between some scales two-octave and some one-octave. If it were me, I would do all the two octaves starting on F below the staff first, up to Bb, then switch over to one octaves for B up to E.
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Alex McMahon
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« Reply #43 on: Aug 12, 2017, 08:20AM »

Just looked at your all-state requirements, guess you have to do them in circle of 4ths starting on concert G. Bummer, but still doable.

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John Thomas
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« Reply #44 on: Aug 12, 2017, 09:50AM »

Instead of doing the math, I sat down with metronome and timer to figure this out.  To start with 12 scales, two minutes, 10 seconds per scale and breath.

1/4, 1/8 note pattern comes out to 108 bpm with a breath every 10 seconds considering you can play every 2 octave scale on 1 breath. 

This is very doable by a good high school player with F attachment.

I am band director that has sat on these audition panels for the all-state process in Texas for 30+ years and the number one reason players don't make the initial cut of the process is not knowing scales.  They leave those points on the table and don't go further even though they played the audition music better than others that played the scales and the music mediocre at best.  If you want to assure yourself of making the band make sure your know your scales.  If you can't spell them orally you can't play them, if you rely on slide patterns and tricks you will make mistakes in the audition. 

Scales are like spelling tests.  When we were young and had to study for spelling test we repeated the words orally or by writing them doing as many times as it took to get the correct spelling.  Learn scales the same way, say the key signature, how many sharps and flats and what they are, then spell the scale up and down, if you can't read it out loud you can't read it mentally while playing.  Most errors happen on the way down because many people say and teach that coming down is the same as going up just backwards.  Not true, we read music left to right, up and down, not backwards.  The reason fewer errors happen going up is because from the time we are young we hear and sing the ABC song, the going up the scale order the ABC's is ingrained with us from then on.  We never hear and are not taught in music well enough, AGFEDCBA.  Late in my career I realized much of this after teaching elementary  music in the middle of my career and being involved with the K thru 2nd grade teacher and how they taught reading. 

When we read a book we hear the words we are reading in our mind.  If you don't read music and first hear the note names of a scale in your mind as you read left to right up and down the staff you will have many errors.  Also, you must call a note by the correct name Eb and Ab must be called that name mentally and orally or you will play E or A natural or whatever note you have misnamed.  You cannot play the correct slide position if you don't mentally name the correctly first as you read.  As we become better and fluent readers this happens very naturally and in milliseconds.
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EdGrissom

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« Reply #45 on: Aug 13, 2017, 06:39AM »



I am band director that has sat on these audition panels for the all-state process in Texas for 30+ years and the number one reason players don't make the initial cut of the process is not knowing scales.  They leave those points on the table and don't go further even though they played the audition music better than others that played the scales and the music mediocre at best.  If you want to assure yourself of making the band make sure your know your scales.  If you can't spell them orally you can't play them, if you rely on slide patterns and tricks you will make mistakes in the audition. 




I judged the Texas auditions for many years also.  They played the scales first and if they botched them I pretty much quit listening to the rest of their audition.   Sad, but true.  . 
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« Reply #46 on: Aug 13, 2017, 10:05AM »

I attended one of Josh Hauser's warmup sessions, and we went through 12 keys with a playalong.  That seemed an effective way to do them, and even added some fun.

https://sites.tntech.edu/jhauser/brass-warmups-with-mp3-play-a-long-tracks/tromboneeuphonium-warmups-with-mp3-play-a-long-tracks/

I think Michael Davis's warmups have a playalong too, but I don't have them.

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Tim Richardson
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« Reply #47 on: Aug 13, 2017, 10:20AM »

I attended one of Josh Hauser's warmup sessions, and we went through 12 keys with a playalong.  That seemed an effective way to do them, and even added some fun.

https://sites.tntech.edu/jhauser/brass-warmups-with-mp3-play-a-long-tracks/tromboneeuphonium-warmups-with-mp3-play-a-long-tracks/

I think Michael Davis's warmups have a playalong too, but I don't have them.


The demos are very helpful to hear how it should be done. The play-alongs are nice as well. Sometimes I just use a metronome, especially when I want to extend the exercises higher and/or lower.

Using one of the popular notation programs, a play-along midi could be made of two-octave scales.

...Geezer
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MikeBMiller
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« Reply #48 on: Aug 14, 2017, 03:06PM »

That reminds me of my all state band audition my senior year of HS (1978 - yes I am old). I knew all my scales, but instead of telling us to play a certain scale, the judges said something like - play the scale that has 3 flats, or 2 sharps, etc. I was fine until they said play the scale that has 7 sharps. I had never seen 7 sharps in my life. So I thought about it for a second and then played the wrong scale. They finally told me what scale it was and let me try again. I'm still not sure that I know what scale has 7 sharps.
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BGuttman
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« Reply #49 on: Aug 14, 2017, 04:34PM »

Psst - C# major.  Same as Db major. :)
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MikeBMiller
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« Reply #50 on: Aug 14, 2017, 05:12PM »

Psst - C# major.  Same as Db major. :)

Good to know for my next all state band audition. If they have an all state geezer band. I still got 3rd. 1/2 point out of second, but the guy that got first just killed the rest of us by 10 points on a 200 point scale. But he isn't playing trombone any more, so I want a do over!
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« Reply #51 on: Aug 15, 2017, 05:13AM »

Psst - C# major.  Same as Db major. :)

For extra points, what scale has 8 flats?

Don't laugh, I've played wind band music that had 8 flats in the key signature.  Remembering B double flat was tricky.  I understand there's a familiar orchestral piece too but I've never seen that one.





































(Db minor)

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Tim Richardson
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