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Author Topic: High note articulation  (Read 4261 times)
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ssking2b

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« Reply #60 on: Aug 23, 2017, 11:40AM »

All correct about the Accousticoil.  The inventor/manufacturer, Don Novy, makes them himself.  He is now over 80, and just not feeling like working too hard.  I hope to work out something with him and my partners where we can make it, and sell it. I will keep the forum posted, as we will want to get a few folks to experiment with it soon.  I have a friend who is experimenting with the trumpet version now, and having some success.

Since it has always been a one man operation, distribution has been small.  When I first tried it I didn't care for it.  Later, after some experimentation with placement, the result was stunningly good.  Don never said it would work for everyone in every horn...but at a relatively inexpensive price, it won't hurt your wallet to try it.  If we do reach an agreement with him, we intend to keep the price affordable.  It's more important to us keep a good product around, not to make a fortune.  But, to paraphrase Tevye, a small fortune couldn't hurt!
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Bob Riddle

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« Reply #61 on: Aug 28, 2017, 04:04PM »

Just posted a video unedited of an exercise for consistency of attacks ,while working on  obtaining a (feel) for every note.This can be started on any note.I chose a middle "F" because it is how it was originally given to me.
Bob Riddle



https://youtu.be/WbitAbaxAws
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Geezerhorn

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« Reply #62 on: Aug 29, 2017, 05:49AM »

I recognized the pattern immediately! I use it for long tones and endurance training by breathing in through my stuffed-up nose. lol

So now I'll have to start using it for expanding my range! I like the idea of alternating high & low. I use the same concept on ballad songs that are pitched high. I'll start them off high and then play the second chorus as low as possible. Alan Kaplan's "Fools Rush In" is a good one for that. There are some important low B's to try for in trigger b2nd when I play his chart down two octaves after playing it up as written. Roy Agee's "I'm In The Mood For Love" - in swing - is great for that variation as well; lots of low C's and if I alternate low/high - there is a high D to make. I should try to do a recording of me playing it alternately low/high sometime. If (when) I can play through it hitting lush low C's and a vibrant high D - all lyrically - I'll figure those songs are no longer "etudes" for me. lol

My point is that to improve upon high note articulation and high-note development in general, I think it's important to sometimes also alternate with lots of low-range work - as you did on the demo. Why? Well, for me - I think it helps keep me from getting muscle-bound (for lack of a better term); keeps the chops supple - same as the Michael Davis warm-up flexibility exercises do for me (as well as opening up my tone) and helps to more smoothly connect the ranges, which just hitting one high note after another might not tend to do. So it's part of an "attack the high range (and low range) from all angles" strategy.

And I believe there is another good reason to incorporate that exercise or one like it: it can serve as a bench-mark for progress over time. Right now, I am using the Range Exercise in the Michael Davis "15-Minute Warm-Up Book" for that purpose. I use his play-along track and when I get the high Bb arpeggio out that is the end of his exercise, I quickly turn the volume down on my stereo (without taking my chops off the mpc) and continue extending the exercise up by half-steps. I can clearly note my progress over the past 8(?) months and it's encouraging. The only caveat with that approach is to not jump off the bridge (or do a mpc switch - LOL) if I have a bad day (or three). It's the long-term trend I believe that is important to keep focusing on. Okay, glean encouragement from the good days and fuggetabout (ala Sam) the bad days. lol

Anyway, thanks for sharing! Hope to see you soon!

...Geezer
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timothy42b
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« Reply #63 on: Aug 29, 2017, 05:51AM »

I recognized the pattern immediately!

It has a name, spiderweb.
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Tim Richardson
Bob Riddle

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« Reply #64 on: Aug 29, 2017, 06:33AM »

 Good! Exactly!

Bob Riddle
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svenlarsson

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« Reply #65 on: Aug 31, 2017, 07:11AM »

About the conversation a while back, (not about the exact place to put the slide but how to name the positions), I found the book "Alternate Position System For Trombone" by Tom Malone. Copyright 1974.
His nomeclature is close to the Scandnavian.
Ex. 7th partial G position 1.7 abbreviation #2.
11th partial Eb position 1.5 abbreviation 1 1/2.
13th partial F# postion 1.4 abbreviation b1.

Of course this is only for talking about the positions.
As I hinted before, when we do play we use our ears and adjust the slide.
He is not using all possible positions though.

15th partial Ab pos. 2 abb. 2.
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Kanstul 1662. Bach 45B. Kanstul 1555. Besson Euphonium. Kanstul 66-S Tuba. Sackbuts in F/E/Eb Bb/A
And several horns I should sell.
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