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Author Topic: Jet-Tone Design  (Read 424 times)
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Pteranabone

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« on: Aug 11, 2017, 08:53PM »

In the 70's, many prominent brass players were playing (or at least endorsing) Jet-Tones.  (I bought the Urbie Green "M" as a student, contrary to my instructor's advice).  I note that they are of a lighter material than most mouthpieces and lack plating.  They are also all V shaped rather than cupped.  Anyone have any knowledge in why they chose their engineering design parameters?  Also, how did they garner so many endorsements (beyond the obvious $ answer).
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BGuttman
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« Reply #1 on: Aug 11, 2017, 10:14PM »

You may notice that there weren't many classical players endorsing Jet Tones.  I have a Jet Tone B.  It's a good "high note getter" but I never liked my tone on it.  Apparently not too many other folks did either.  I think some of them were aluminum.  Mine seems to be.
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Bruce Guttman
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Driswood

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« Reply #2 on: Aug 12, 2017, 03:31PM »

In the 70's, many prominent brass players were playing (or at least endorsing) Jet-Tones.  (I bought the Urbie Green "M" as a student, contrary to my instructor's advice).  I note that they are of a lighter material than most mouthpieces and lack plating.  They are also all V shaped rather than cupped.  Anyone have any knowledge in why they chose their engineering design parameters?  Also, how did they garner so many endorsements (beyond the obvious $ answer).

I'm pretty sure they had an option of mouthpieces made from aluminum. Would be light and would require no plating.

Jerry Walker
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Dukesboneman

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« Reply #3 on: Aug 12, 2017, 04:33PM »

Most Jet Tone Mouthpieces were around a 12C-ish size. They also made the oddist Bass Trombone mouthpiece I`ve ever seen.
For a very brief period in the 1980`s they made a 6 1/2 Al and a 7C. I have one of the 7C`s made out of Aluminum.
The rim contour feels very much like my Doug Elliott 98 rim.The Mouthpiece gets a different sound (slightly) because of the alluminum.
A sound tech friend of mine that also makes speakers said that he stopped using aluminum because it does`nt  react to sound vibrations that same as say  - Brass
I always thought the design was cool looking.
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Pre59

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« Reply #4 on: Aug 13, 2017, 01:55AM »

I had a Buddy Morrow model. It was silver plated and had what I can only describe as an inverted cup, played high very easily with a clear cutting sound. It was about the same width as an 11C, but had a flatter rim, and I used it to liven up a "butchered" Bach 12 horn.

You can see a little of the shape here; the inside profile is similar to outer.

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Jet-Tone-jet-tone-mouthpiece-reissue-series-trombone-BM-Buddy-Morrow-mode-P-O-/112456526625?epid=1263001356&hash=item1a2eee6b21:g:LWgAAOSwAO9ZUCfa
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oslide

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« Reply #5 on: Aug 13, 2017, 05:48AM »

Looks like an extreme double cup, if I see it right.
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BGuttman
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« Reply #6 on: Aug 13, 2017, 08:26AM »

I don't know about the Buddy Morrow model, but mine (B) was a "single cup".
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Bruce Guttman
Solo Trombone, Hollis Town Band
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Pre59

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« Reply #7 on: Aug 13, 2017, 09:48AM »

Looks like an extreme double cup, if I see it right.


Not really, the inside dropped straight down a little way, and the cup or bowl was concave rather than convex. One of a kind?
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novalvz
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« Reply #8 on: Today at 06:54 PM »

I have an original one in brass.  Stamped "BUDDY MORROW MODEL 1" .

The inner cup shape is as described by Pre59.   
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TromboneMonkey

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« Reply #9 on: Today at 06:57 PM »

The Ms and Ds that I've seen have a cup that goes up to the edge of the throat and then drops immediately into the throat (a very clean, hard angle).  Other than the Morrow I used to own, I've never played one I thought was usable, much less good.
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-John
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