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The Trombone ForumHorns, Gear, and EquipmentInstruments(Moderators: tbone62, slide advantage) Accessing the high register on a Holton tr-150
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norbie2009

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« on: Aug 13, 2017, 06:52AM »

I just received a Holton tr-150 I purchased from a forum member. The serial number dates it to the early 70s. It needs some work but is in playable condition. Beautiful sound and easy to color.

It is difficult to play the high register. I have a Yamaha xeno to compare to. The high g on up on the Yamaha slots easily: not so on the Holton. It's just hard to play. So, what can I do about it? Pull the lead pipe and replace? Check the rotor for alignment? Just practice until I get used to where the high register slots? Something else? I'd appreciate your input.
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harrison.t.reed
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« Reply #1 on: Aug 13, 2017, 07:52AM »

Is it just this G  Tenor Clef ? What about the Bb above it?

There are some horns where that partial is no bueno. Sometimes it's caused by the design, or it could even be a dent in the tuning slide, an offset rotor, or a very minor leak in the water key.
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norbie2009

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« Reply #2 on: Aug 13, 2017, 08:05AM »

Sorry if I wasn't clear, it is the g you listed and the notes above it.
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« Reply #3 on: Aug 13, 2017, 11:01AM »

I have a friend who has a 150 and easily plays  Bb up an octave. So its not the design. Harry is right about  being squirrelly on a lot of horns, though. I'd fill your horn with water and check for leaks.
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mr.deacon
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« Reply #4 on: Aug 13, 2017, 01:04PM »

Sit with a tuner and make sure your positions are right.

Remember there are only two slide positions on a trombone. Right and wrong!

I had a Holton TR256 (aka the Friedman tenor) that I was just fighting in the upper partial. I found out later after sitting in front of a tuner that the positions in upper partial were in different spots then any other horn I've ever played. Once I stopped fighting the horn and put my slide in the right spot the horn spoke just as easy as any other tenor.

Shires, Yamahas, ect. have us spoiled these days with horns that have very consistent tuning and little to no wacky notes on the slides!

Try that before ditching the horn or modding it.
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norbie2009

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« Reply #5 on: Aug 13, 2017, 03:40PM »

I have a friend who has a 150 and easily plays  Bb up an octave. So its not the design. Harry is right about  being squirrelly on a lot of horns, though. I'd fill your horn with water and check for leaks.

Thanks for the advice. I did fill it up but could find no leaks.
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norbie2009

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« Reply #6 on: Aug 13, 2017, 03:46PM »

Sit with a tuner and make sure your positions are right.

Remember there are only two slide positions on a trombone. Right and wrong!

I had a Holton TR256 (aka the Friedman tenor) that I was just fighting in the upper partial. I found out later after sitting in front of a tuner that the positions in upper partial were in different spots then any other horn I've ever played. Once I stopped fighting the horn and put my slide in the right spot the horn spoke just as easy as any other tenor.

Shires, Yamahas, ect. have us spoiled these days with horns that have very consistent tuning and little to no wacky notes on the slides!

Try that before ditching the horn or modding it.

Thanks - sound advice no pun intended. There is something else I noticed. I am used to wide slides, at least that's what I've been playing on for a couple of years. The Holton has a narrow slide. The angle of my chops to mouth piece changes between the narrow and wide slides, which has been throwing the high register off. I will use a tuner and find where the notes lay, but that change of angle is not helping. I hope that makes sense.
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« Reply #7 on: Aug 13, 2017, 05:56PM »

I can say that all the Holton tenors I have played have been a bit wonky as far as intonation goes.  Other players have reported to me that they thought otherwise.  But I would try other leadpipes.  That is just me; YMMV.
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