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The Trombone ForumCreation and PerformanceOther Musicians and Ensembles(Moderator: blast) 100 years old. The first jazz recording.
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Graham Martin
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« on: Aug 22, 2017, 03:48PM »

Original Dixieland Jass Band - Livery Stable Blues. This is the first ever jazz recording, now celebrating its 100 year birthday. And the ODJB also went on to spread the jazz message all round the world. Good!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Um4xhfwYnvg

It is of course nonsense to say they invented jazz but they certainly did a lot to popularize it.
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Grah

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robcat2075

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« Reply #1 on: Aug 22, 2017, 04:28PM »

Not enough animal sounds in jazz today.
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Robert Holmén

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davdud101
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« Reply #2 on: Sep 20, 2017, 05:41AM »

Ah, nothin' like some good ol' Jass!
I find it interesting that the playing when compared to later "Dixieland"/trad. jazz has VERY many 'long notes' and is much closer to straight in feel than today's triplets-based swing.
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BGuttman
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« Reply #3 on: Sep 20, 2017, 06:28AM »

This tune was also called "Barnyard Blues".  We had a tuba player who could make a really good moo through his tuba, but a lot of the other animal sounds were a bit beyond us.

Notice that EVERYBODY plays behind each soloist.

Thanks for sharing this, Grah.
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Bruce Guttman
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« Reply #4 on: Sep 20, 2017, 07:29AM »


Notice that EVERYBODY plays behind each soloist.


It makes for very tedious effect after a few minutes. The whole thing sounds like the "big finish". 

Aside from the animal noises, I'm not sure they really take solos... maybe it was just accidental that someone slightly peeked out above the texture for a bit.  Don't know
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Robert Holmén

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Pre59

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« Reply #5 on: Sep 20, 2017, 11:21AM »

Collective improvisation was the norm until Louis Armstrong pretty much invented the concept the individual soloist.
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