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Author Topic: Endless wind... the Aerophor!  (Read 696 times)
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BGuttman
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« Reply #20 on: Sep 06, 2017, 05:28PM »

How about a tube attached to a tracheotomy hole?

Now there's an idea.  But we'd all have to get tracheotomies.  I personally don't want one -- I like to be able to talk. :-P
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Bruce Guttman
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robcat2075

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« Reply #21 on: Sep 06, 2017, 06:17PM »

When I was a boy it seemed like every medical drama would eventually have someone getting an emergency tracheotomy, ideally by someone who had never done it before.

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Robert Holmén

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« Reply #22 on: Sep 07, 2017, 05:07AM »

This is kind of ghoulish so I'll try to be sensitive.

Before polio vaccine in the mid 50s, the treatment was the iron lung, a device that squeezed your rib cage mechanically and allowed you to live.  There were thousands of people in these cages, some of them who lived 60 years or more that way.  They cost about the price of a small house in those days.

The US still has 6 or 7 people surviving in them, the UK has 1 I think, of course these numbers are a couple years old. 

One of the fears is that we no longer have anybody left who knows how to repair them. 
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Tim Richardson
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« Reply #23 on: Sep 07, 2017, 07:21AM »

Looks like it could be a challenge holding the tuba still while pumping with the right leg.

The modern day version of that would be to have a main pipe under the stage floor with bayonet type air fittings coming through the floor to which the musician plugged in his/her personal air hose.  A foot operated flow control valve would take care of volume control.:)

You could have some fun by injecting some helium into the system just upstream of the flute section to see if it improved their tuning.:D
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harrison.t.reed
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« Reply #24 on: Sep 07, 2017, 07:26AM »

This is kind of ghoulish so I'll try to be sensitive.

Before polio vaccine in the mid 50s, the treatment was the iron lung, a device that squeezed your rib cage mechanically and allowed you to live.  There were thousands of people in these cages, some of them who lived 60 years or more that way.  They cost about the price of a small house in those days.

The US still has 6 or 7 people surviving in them, the UK has 1 I think, of course these numbers are a couple years old. 

One of the fears is that we no longer have anybody left who knows how to repair them. 

what does this have to do with music? You forgot to tie the story in  :-P
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timothy42b
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« Reply #25 on: Sep 07, 2017, 08:03AM »

what does this have to do with music? You forgot to tie the story in  :-P

From the iron lung, I was thinking maybe a giant blood pressure cuff could squeeze our rib cage enough to do the air support needed on trombone.

I note that Temple Grande built herself a squeeze cage out of plywood to cope with her autism symptoms, but it is not known whether she ever played trombone. 

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Tim Richardson
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« Reply #26 on: Sep 07, 2017, 10:24AM »

I will pedantically note that the "iron lung" was more of a vacuum device. The reduced pressure inside the chamber allowed the higher pressure outside air to rush in through the patient's mouth and windpipe to the lungs. Then I presume there was some reverse pressure to exhale the air. Repeat.

Wikipedia says there were still 10 people on these devices in 2014

More recently, Christopher Reeve was unable to breathe on his own but he seemed to have been outfitted with a tube that blew air in through a throat hole.







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Robert Holmén

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