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Author Topic: Criteria for jazz mouthpiece  (Read 2248 times)
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tbathras
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« Reply #20 on: Sep 12, 2017, 07:21AM »

I am stuck with a $170 mp I can't sell to save my life.

small shank m'pcs make good funnels to fill a flask.  Just sayin'.  Evil
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reedman1
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« Reply #21 on: Sep 12, 2017, 08:04AM »

Thanks, everybody. Doug Elliott, I really appreciate knowing more about your thought process in designing mouthpieces. Exzaclee, that was a terrific history lesson and helps fill in the gaps. Geezerhorn, good thoughts about ensembles.

I'm pretty new to trombone, as you guys have clearly guessed. But I'm not new to playing, or to mouthpieces. I played reeds for years. I had a long hiatus when I didn't play anything. Then at the age of 57 I picked up cornet, then trumpet. I've had a few safaris before, and I know that the goal is to fit my face, my horn, my style and my playing situation. And my budget, btw.

The only thing I really wanted to know was what mouthpiece makers mean when they say a mouthpiece is good for jazz. The answer seems to be "well suited for playing with agility," which seems to translate to "a little on the high side" because the slide doesn't have to move as far, which translates to "kind of small." Is that about right?

I'll just mention that in my first post, I did say "I know that whatever mouthpiece someone is happy playing jazz on is a jazz mouthpiece." I meant it. And if I have to play something that isn't jazz, I'll use the same mouthpiece unless the sound is somehow totally unsuitable.

Thanks again for sharing your knowledge with me.
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BGuttman
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« Reply #22 on: Sep 12, 2017, 10:04AM »

I ended up buying a 7ST for my big horn and then ended up not liking it as well as the Schilke 53 I have played for years. Of course, I waited until after the 30 day trial period to decide this, so I am stuck with a $170 mp I can't sell to save my life.

Wanna swap even up for an 8ST cup? (cup for cup)
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Bruce Guttman
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« Reply #23 on: Sep 12, 2017, 10:14AM »


All of the answers were serious. You just might not like what we have to say.

My answer was, in fact, not serious.
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« Reply #24 on: Sep 12, 2017, 03:16PM »

My answer was, in fact, not serious.
But you are always serious.  Don't know
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« Reply #25 on: Sep 12, 2017, 03:18PM »

 :D
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"My technique is as good as Initial D"
T-396A - Griego 1C
88HTCL - Griego 1C
36H - DE XT105, C+, D Alto Shank
3B/F Silversonic - Griego 1A ss
pBone (with Yellow bell for bright tone)
baileyman
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« Reply #26 on: Sep 17, 2017, 06:37AM »

Thanks, everybody. Doug Elliott, I really appreciate knowing more about your thought process in designing mouthpieces. Exzaclee, that was a terrific history lesson and helps fill in the gaps. Geezerhorn, good thoughts about ensembles.

I'm pretty new to trombone, as you guys have clearly guessed. But I'm not new to playing, or to mouthpieces. I played reeds for years. I had a long hiatus when I didn't play anything. Then at the age of 57 I picked up cornet, then trumpet. I've had a few safaris before, and I know that the goal is to fit my face, my horn, my style and my playing situation. And my budget, btw.

The only thing I really wanted to know was what mouthpiece makers mean when they say a mouthpiece is good for jazz. The answer seems to be "well suited for playing with agility," which seems to translate to "a little on the high side" because the slide doesn't have to move as far, which translates to "kind of small." Is that about right?

I'll just mention that in my first post, I did say "I know that whatever mouthpiece someone is happy playing jazz on is a jazz mouthpiece." I meant it. And if I have to play something that isn't jazz, I'll use the same mouthpiece unless the sound is somehow totally unsuitable.

Thanks again for sharing your knowledge with me.

Well then, keep playing and listening.  From inside a trombone section you'll get an idea whether your sound is adequately contributing.  This may indicate a change in piece.  Realize, though, that "The Trombone Sound" as per Kai Winding basically wrapped up around 1965 and since then it's been kindof loosie goosie.  But if you're in a band playing older charts and are among people who care, you'll end up with a smaller horn and a small Bach piece, generally. 

If you get into improvisation, you may seek out a piece that helps the horn do what you want. 
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MikeBMiller
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« Reply #27 on: Sep 17, 2017, 08:37PM »

Wanna swap even up for an 8ST cup? (cup for cup)

Bruce - sorry I just saw this. Looks like the 8 is actually a bit smaller than the 7 and I need to go bigger. But if you're interested, I would give you a good deal or. Ay e you have something else to trade. Thanks.
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BGuttman
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« Reply #28 on: Sep 17, 2017, 08:54PM »

Bruce - sorry I just saw this. Looks like the 8 is actually a bit smaller than the 7 and I need to go bigger. But if you're interested, I would give you a good deal or. Ay e you have something else to trade. Thanks.

8 is supposed to be exactly like a Bach 4G, but I find it feels smaller (I regularly play a Wick 4Bx).  The 7D seems to work fine on my Bach 36 for concert band and I thought the 7ST might work for orchestra.  But my Wick 4BS is working pretty well.

I'm not sure you can go much bigger than a 7 in Warburtons without going into the bass range.  We're talking 6 or lower for the size.  I played a 3B in place of a 1 1/2 G (still use it on my Euphonium).  I have a 25 year old 3 (now the 3B) that needs plating that I can trade perhaps with a bit of cash (me to you).  We can take this off-line.  It's not helping the OP.
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Bruce Guttman
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« Reply #29 on: Sep 18, 2017, 01:22AM »

In my reality I want a m/p/horn combination that plays broad when at a lower volumes and the "points" at higher ones. Also how it blends or leads is important; so I've found that a smaller horn and larger V cup m/p works for me. The Wick 9BS is a good alternative to a VB 6.5AL not being an air hog and having a clean upper register.
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In my reality..
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