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Author Topic: Amateurs vs. Professionals  (Read 847 times)
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robcat2075

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« Reply #20 on: Sep 11, 2017, 05:31PM »

They're kind of like horoscope statements.  You can see yourself in them or not depending on your outlook.
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Robert Holmén

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Get your Popper, Dotzauer, or Kummer play-alongs!
Max Croot
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« Reply #21 on: Sep 11, 2017, 06:23PM »

Hi After playing professionally for some years and after experiencing the music scene, I quit  professional music because after witnessing  what happens I decided that I liked music too much to remain a professional. It is just a job to a lot of professionals. I know a lot of retired pro's who never play another note after they retire. You don't often see a retired tradesman, eg Plumbers, bricklayers etc who continue to hone their skills after the retire. I am now 88 and continue to practice every day. Currently practicing the old William Tell for a coming concert. I was never a soloist as such though I have played a lot of them, I was most happy as a team player and I can now concentrate on mentoring my students. The conductor of the orchestra is one if my ex students who started his own production company to perform opera and ballet. The older I get the better I used to be but I'm still sure the music is a great saviour. I have lost two wives to cancer and I get on my horn and blow the hell out of it. Thank god for the trombone.
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Bass Clef
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« Reply #22 on: Sep 11, 2017, 06:32PM »

Hi After playing professionally for some years and after experiencing the music scene, I quit  professional music because after witnessing  what happens I decided that I liked music too much to remain a professional. It is just a job to a lot of professionals. I know a lot of retired pro's who never play another note after they retire. You don't often see a retired tradesman, eg Plumbers, bricklayers etc who continue to hone their skills after the retire. I am now 88 and continue to practice every day. Currently practicing the old William Tell for a coming concert. I was never a soloist as such though I have played a lot of them, I was most happy as a team player and I can now concentrate on mentoring my students. The conductor of the orchestra is one if my ex students who started his own production company to perform opera and ballet. The older I get the better I used to be but I'm still sure the music is a great saviour. I have lost two wives to cancer and I get on my horn and blow the hell out of it. Thank god for the trombone.

That's inspiring!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

...Geezer
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Ellrod

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« Reply #23 on: Sep 11, 2017, 06:33PM »

88 eh?
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Torobone

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« Reply #24 on: Sep 11, 2017, 06:51PM »

Back to the original post. After spending about 30 years reading self-help books (I stopped 10 years ago), the article is typical of gimmicks to draw 30-somethings into some thought provoking ideas. I seriously doubt that the author had to make a choice of doing something for money or doing it for love. The article is more about behaving like a professional or not.

In the past 10 years, I have been so very fortunate to meet some lifetime trombone pros who still get a kick out of playing into their 70s. They have both my admiration and my envy.

And to Max's post, yes he is 88. I know a few other near-nonagenarians who can still really play and good for them all.
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Martin Hubel
Yamaha 891Z & 830 Xeno bass (both played regularly) , '74 Bach 42B, Yamaha 322 bass
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« Reply #25 on: Sep 11, 2017, 11:14PM »

That is a very interesting point and I can get what you mean. At a certain point, you dance with who brung you.

And yet there is an element of resignation and/or giving up that I am not comfortable with. I told my physician last month during a routine exam that this 69-year old runs 3 miles every morning and then lifts weights for strength gain for 1/2 hour afterwards. I told him I am not ready to give up.

And I don't think any player - regardless of what he has attained - should give up either. Now, that doesn't mean he should drive himself mad by unnecessarily pushing himself. But I think there should always be a certain amount of pushing oneself to do those things that he would like to do better, even if it isn't on the current dinner plate.

There is a gentleman on this Forum (I hope he is still on) who has retired from professional playing. Now he is trying to make those improvements to his playing that (if I understand him correctly) he had always wanted to do. Even in retirement, he is not giving up.

And I don't think anyone should give up trying to improve and just milk it for the rest of the time. I simply can not buy that any pro anywhere should resign themselves to not trying - on some level of effort and it doesn't have to be Herculean - to improve some aspect of their playing, always.

If we combine our thoughts, then a player will continue to work on his weaknesses. But his weaknesses will not be his absolute weaknesses. They will be his strengths that are relatively weak compared to his other strengths. He is still striving to make gains, however.

...Geezer

Yes I agree with that general sentiment. My point (and I think the point the author was making) was not that a professional should not try to improve and just milk what they have for the rest of their career, but more that at some point, your strengths will define the kind of playing you will do professionally, and you might want to put the time you have in improving those aspects of your playing that you are actually banking on.

In other words, finding ways to sell what you're already doing well (and to keep improving that) is more likely to make you succeed professionally than working on your weaknesses and hoping somebody will notice that you got generally better.


A good image is this : you want to cross a corn field that has a few pre-existing paths going across it. Even if some paths may make more turns, or lead to dead ends, it's still going to be faster to just follow these paths than trying to force and cut your way through the crops until you've cut down the whole field.

Another one : playing an instrument is a quest, but it's also an adventure. Circumstances affect your quest - and letting yourself find something nice you weren't searching for may be just as fun as finding what you were actually looking for.
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Maximilien Brisson
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« Reply #26 on: Sep 12, 2017, 12:38AM »

What I have seen is that nearly all play because they love music. At least that is the start point for most people. For amateurs I believe the social factor also is high. For professional musicians there can be one disturbing factor; money....how to make a secure life with family, house, car etc.

The pressure for result is in fact high also among many amateur bands, orchestras around. I just see some of the brass bands here in Norway.

There is all types of persons in everything but I see there is often lot of humble and clever people that survive in the professional life.
I also see there sometimes is a lack of joy in the professional world. Especially among some string players. Trombone players are often more enthusiastic of course!

Leif
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Bass Trombone - Conn, Holton
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