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Author Topic: College Pointers  (Read 395 times)
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dgstern4
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« on: Oct 14, 2017, 05:04PM »

Hello,
     I'm a freshman in college, currently working on a dual major Music Ed/Music Performance, but I'm not sure if in the following years I would be able to handle two music degrees at once (especially in light of student teaching), so I've been considering focusing on education and dropping the performance degree. When I went into the performance program, I was planning on being more of a freelancer, maybe a studio musician after graduation, but honestly I've never been particularly interested in working in the whole orchestral world, and it seems that a lot of the performance track is geared toward helping young players enter that market. So my question here is, as I am currently still undecided about whether I would like to go into education or freelancing, would it be better to stick with the dual major or focus on education. I know a few trombonists that freelance in my city that never went to college at all, so I can't imagine it would matter that much, but I figured I'd ask someone who knows more before making any lasting decisions. Thanks in advance!
    Douglas
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robcat2075

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« Reply #1 on: Oct 14, 2017, 05:41PM »

I recall that a commenter in a previous thread like this noted that the "studio musician" market for trombone players is so small as to be non-existent for practical purposes.

Music Ed...

I have been a music ed major and taught band in a public school.

Education is for people who love teaching. Liking the subject is not enough. You need to love the teaching process. Not just the gifted and cooperative students but also the ones who have zero interest and zero civility. In a public school job you have to successfully manage all of them.  It's an unhappy fit for people who would rather be doing something else.

You need to love answering the same question 100x over because you will be asked the same questions and need to solve the same problems 100x over.

A music ed job is 90% education, 10% music. It is very unlike the musical experiences you will have in college.


Since you have noted that successful trombonists don't necessarily need a degree in trombone playing, have you considered other non-music majors that might be interesting and useful and lucrative?  It's easy to switch gears now while you are a freshman. You can still take lessons and still play in ensembles without being a "major".
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Robert Holmén

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Nanook

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« Reply #2 on: Oct 14, 2017, 05:58PM »

Rob, Great advice as usual....Ideally One needs to pay the bills and be happy at their jobs.  The order in which they are prioritized is up to each individual....

Nanook
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“Without deviation from the norm, progress is not possible.”-Frank Zappa
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