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Author Topic: lubricant for removable leadpipes  (Read 1318 times)
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Larry Preston Roberson
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« on: Sep 12, 2017, 04:21PM »

Greetings all! I have performed a precursory search of the forum and the Web, which has yielded sparse information, regarding my query. Until about a year ago, I had never owned trombones with removable leadpipes. Yet oddly enough, the last three I have acquired each have one: Bach 36B and 42B & Jinbao alto. The two Bachs are press fit and the Jinbao is threaded. My question pertains to the title of the post. What lubricant would you recommend, if any, for the pipe itself? As of now I just use them dry, except for a little tuning slide grease on the threads of the Jinbao. But, I'm hesitant to put tuning slide grease, or the like, on the pipe itself. This is to avoid messiness, more than anything, as I swab the bore of the inner tubes at the end of the day. I'm inclined to use slide cream or valve oil. I'm very methodical and diligent about maintaining my instruments. I always dry my horns well, swab the slides, and usually leave them out overnight before putting in the case. In the case of the leadpipes, I pull, dry, and leave them out of the trombone(s) overnight. If any of the trombones in question are stored for long periods, I pull the pipe out and store separately (or in the case), as I fear that it may seize up. Thanks again for any information. I look forward to your thoughts and opinions. Once again, what lubricant(s) would you recommend, if any, for the leadpipe?


p.s. What is the general consensus for spelling said paraphernalia; leadpipe or lead pipe? The former usually prompts spellcheck/auto correct and the latter typically yields news articles related to plumbing; in particular, woes like those of our friends in Flint, Michigan.
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hyperbolica
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« Reply #1 on: Sep 12, 2017, 05:06PM »

Sounds like a little OCD. I personally don't use any lube on leadpipes, but if I did I'd put some petroleum jelly. Or some Teflon tape. The cleanliness is important, so you'll have less need for the lube. Pipes will sieze up over time and neglect. I don't think you'll have any problems.
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Full Pedal Trombonist

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« Reply #2 on: Sep 12, 2017, 05:48PM »

When I clean my slide, which is the part of a horn I clean the most, I put a bit of some German spindle lube on the largest ends of the leadpipe. I'm sure any lube that you feel safe using on your trombone will do. I've used tuning slide grease also. Why not keep it free of corrosion and stickage?
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« Reply #3 on: Sep 12, 2017, 06:34PM »

Just had the Slide Dr. adjust my slide and he had a ton of grease on the leadpipe, way more than I usually put on it. I usually lube mine with trombotine to keep it from seizing like mentioned above.
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BillO
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« Reply #4 on: Sep 12, 2017, 06:39PM »

A little light silicone grease/jelly works for me.  A little dab'll do ya!
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« Reply #5 on: Sep 12, 2017, 07:29PM »

Tiny amount of tuning slide grease on the outside raw brass of the pipe. This keeps it from corroding and keeps it removeable. Also a lighter grease or heavy oil on the threads. Very small amount.
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« Reply #6 on: Sep 12, 2017, 08:13PM »

Inserting a leadpipe without some kind of lube is begging for trouble!!

A small amount of any kind of tuning slide grease on the tube and the threads will keep it from seizing & ensure a good seal.

Eric
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« Reply #7 on: Sep 12, 2017, 08:59PM »

I rub in some of the hetman tuning slide gel on the entire surface to help protect it and keep it from getting stuck.
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« Reply #8 on: Sep 13, 2017, 06:48PM »

Inserting a leadpipe without some kind of lube is begging for trouble!!

A small amount of any kind of tuning slide grease on the tube and the threads will keep it from seizing & ensure a good seal.

Eric


Listen to this man. I just sent my slide back to the shires factory complete with a slightly bent leadpipe and slightly bent inner tube because i was unaware. When I spoke with Ben on the phone I asked what they recomended for leadpipes, and he also said to use a tuning slide lubricant.
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elmsandr

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« Reply #9 on: Sep 14, 2017, 07:12AM »

A note on lubricant on threads...  be careful when tightening.  ANY lubricant on threads will mean that for a given torque, you have less friction on the threads.  Neat.  This ALSO means that for a given torque you will get more clamp load in the joint.  This means that even if you aren't 'over tightening' a joint, it is easier for you to over tighten it due to the fact that the threads are lubed.

So, just lay back a bit on tightening things up when you lube the threads.

Cheers,
Andy
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Andrew Elms
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« Reply #10 on: Sep 14, 2017, 10:34AM »

So, just lay back a bit on tightening things up when you lube the threads.
Good advice any time and WRT many things.
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JWykell
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« Reply #11 on: Sep 15, 2017, 03:19AM »

A note on lubricant on threads...  be careful when tightening.  ANY lubricant on threads will mean that for a given torque, you have less friction on the threads.  Neat.  This ALSO means that for a given torque you will get more clamp load in the joint.  This means that even if you aren't 'over tightening' a joint, it is easier for you to over tighten it due to the fact that the threads are lubed.

So, just lay back a bit on tightening things up when you lube the threads.

Cheers,
Andy

Actually when I was on the phone with Ben he also recommended loosening the pipe a touch (quarter turn?) before putting the slide away.
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Zandit75
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« Reply #12 on: Sep 18, 2017, 11:09PM »

I've inherited a Shires Bass Trombone, and I was looking to change over the lead pipes, but the one in it(#3) is stuck in there.
I've only tried undoing it with my hand, but it won't budge.
I was going to use a rag around the top of the lead pipe and then lightly use some pliers or grips to undo it.
Any other recommendations?
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cigmar

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« Reply #13 on: Sep 19, 2017, 02:56AM »

I've inherited a Shires Bass Trombone, and I was looking to change over the lead pipes, but the one in it(#3) is stuck in there.
I've only tried undoing it with my hand, but it won't budge.
I was going to use a rag around the top of the lead pipe and then lightly use some pliers or grips to undo it.
Any other recommendations?

Try using a wide, thick rubber band to grip the pipe.  If you can't budge it by hand, try gently using pliers with the rubber band.
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« Reply #14 on: Sep 19, 2017, 05:55AM »

Just a note on this...

1) Eric's advice, as always, is gold.

2) If you're using a thick grease (petroleum jelly, salemer red stuff) don't leave your horn in the car when it's 100 outside. It'll get well into the 130s or so in your horn case. That grease will warm up and run. If it gets in the slide it'll gum up your works. Bring your horn inside on hot days. I'm assuming this is what caused me some issues a few years ago.
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ChadA
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« Reply #15 on: Sep 19, 2017, 07:09AM »

Get a rubber strap wrench at a hardware store.  I use the smaller of these two for stuck leadpipes:  https://www.lowes.com/pd/Kobalt-2-Piece-Household-Tool-Set/50029434
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« Reply #16 on: Sep 19, 2017, 01:43PM »

I've inherited a Shires Bass Trombone, and I was looking to change over the lead pipes, but the one in it(#3) is stuck in there.
I've only tried undoing it with my hand, but it won't budge.
I was going to use a rag around the top of the lead pipe and then lightly use some pliers or grips to undo it.
Any other recommendations?
A leather strap works for me.  My Shires leadpipes get stuck after a while. I guess the constant MP insertions just tighten them up - so now I'm in the habit of loosening them off a 1/4 turn after each practice, and snugging up before hand.
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Never look at the conductor. You just encourage them.

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Zandit75
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« Reply #17 on: Sep 19, 2017, 04:52PM »

Thanks everyone for the responses.
I used the rag trick, and there really was no pressure needed on the grips, but it was obviously more than I could apply with just my bare fingers.
The piece of rubber sounds like the right thing to do, so I will keep that in mind for next time if it happens.
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