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Author Topic: 'Airy' tone  (Read 1005 times)
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andyincov
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« on: Mar 29, 2017, 11:54AM »

Hi all,

I have developed a new problem (I'm new to the trombone - about 5 months in).

I have found recently that i sometimes get quite 'airy' tone (can't think of a better word) when I play in a way that produced fairly strong tone recently.  Might this suggest some kind of instrument maintenance problem? I play a pawn shop early 80s King 606.

Thanks and feel free to move this post if I have posted in the wrong spot.

Cheers
Andy
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bonenick

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« Reply #1 on: Mar 29, 2017, 12:07PM »

Tell me how to do it  :D I would like to be able to do airy tone on demand (as in sub-tones).

This problem is often seen/heard after excessive pressure/high note playing. I would take some serious rest (start with a full day rest) than start with soft long tones and slur some partial in p or mf. Take often short rests (10-20sec every 2-3 min of playing)

Do you have any double buzz happening?
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andyincov
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« Reply #2 on: Mar 29, 2017, 12:10PM »

Tell me how to do it  :D I would like to be able to do airy tone on demand (as in sub-tones).

This problem is often seen/heard after excessive pressure/high note playing. I would take some serious rest (start with a full day rest) than start with soft long tones and slur some partial in p or mf. Take often short rests (10-20sec every 2-3 min of playing)

Do you have any double buzz happening?

Thanks - I'll try that

No double buzzing
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uncle duke
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« Reply #3 on: Mar 29, 2017, 07:07PM »

I use a mute when I play trombone 99% of the time.  I noticed the airy tone question earlier, pretty much knew the reply I'd type but decided to wait until I played again to be sure.

  I knew I would have the airy tone after removing the mute.  Personally, I like the airy sound but to find an answer for your question I'd say put more air through the horn until airy goes away then back off a little until you can barely hear airy again. 

  If you're going to be in a band then the airy sound may work for a bit until others, like a conductor/teacher, will want to know what they have in the back row as a trombone player.  Being shy and airy sounding may not work but for home use it's o.k. - better than going deaf.   
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Blowero

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« Reply #4 on: Mar 29, 2017, 08:01PM »

Make sure the cork didn't fall off your spit valve, and see if any joints in the trombone have broken loose.
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crazytrombonist505
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« Reply #5 on: Mar 30, 2017, 05:11AM »

Make sure the cork didn't fall off your spit valve, and see if any joints in the trombone have broken loose.

One time when I was playing in a pep-band I noticed that my sound was really airy and some notes weren't producing at all. I was freaking out over this! But after we played, I went up to my band director and told him about my problem. The very first think he checked was my spit valve, and sure enough, the screw had come out of the brace, and so my spit valve was just hanging there letting all the air out. So yeah, check your spit valve!  Good!
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uncle duke
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« Reply #6 on: Mar 30, 2017, 06:23AM »

Put the slide and mouthpiece together, put thumb over the open end and try blowing.  I'd think there shouldn't be any air leakage or sound.   
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crazytrombonist505
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« Reply #7 on: Mar 31, 2017, 06:33AM »

Put the slide and mouthpiece together, put thumb over the open end and try blowing.  I'd think there shouldn't be any air leakage or sound.   

Another alternative to this way is to insert the mouthpiece into the receiver. Place your thumb over the opening (which inserts into the bell section.) Then place the mouthpiece against your cheek. With your thumb securely on the other opening, try moving the slide. If it pulls on your cheek, that's a good sign that there are no leaks  Good!
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timothy42b
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« Reply #8 on: Mar 31, 2017, 06:57AM »

I'm not sure "airy" means the same to all of us. 

For me, if I do not set the mouthpiece on with the right amount of pressure on the lower lip, I will get an unfocused tone.  By that I mean if I use too little pressure.  YMMV. 
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Tim Richardson
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« Reply #9 on: Sep 19, 2017, 08:49AM »

An airy tone is quite beautiful... I took years to perfect mine :

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w2_yXduElaE
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