Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length

 
Advanced search

1087070 Posts in 71980 Topics- by 19233 Members - Latest Member: Midnight1961
Jump to:  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
Print
Author Topic: Finding/Testing Mouthpieces  (Read 780 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
jasonlvazquez
*
Offline Offline

Location:
Joined: Jan 20, 2017
Posts: 3

View Profile
« on: Oct 12, 2017, 11:55AM »

Hello!

I am in search of finding a new mouthpiece. I have never been too gear savvy and just always played on what I had. As I'm moving forward in my playing, I've been considering changing my equipment and trying some new things. With that said, is there anyway for me to test a bunch of mouthpieces without having to go to a music festival booth? I know I can ask fellow trombone players, but some aren't too fond of letting me test them.  :-P

My local music stores only have a small selection of mouthpieces to try out and I haven't had much luck there in finding something that feels completely comfortable for me.

Please let me know what suggestions you all have!

Best Regards,

Jason
Logged

Jason
Full Pedal Trombonist

*
Offline Offline

Location:
Joined: Jun 16, 2009
Posts: 2982

View Profile
« Reply #1 on: Oct 12, 2017, 01:39PM »

Besides going to a festival booth you could make a trip to a mouthpiece maker. Which would be far.

Really these seem like your only options.

If you have the funds you can buy a few and send them back if they donít gel with you. Many makershave decent enough return policies. Just pay for shipping and they will refund the mouthpiece cost. 
Logged

We don't just embrace insanity here, we feel it up, french kiss it and then buy it a drink.
Geezerhorn

*
Offline Offline

Location: PA
Joined: Feb 9, 2012
Posts: 5557
"Lego My Trombone"


View Profile
« Reply #2 on: Oct 12, 2017, 01:46PM »

Used mouthpieces are usually found pretty cheap on eBay. Just buy up a bunch and resell the ones your don't like back on eBay. It has worked for me. Trombones, too!

...Geezer
Logged
BGuttman
Mad Chemist

*
*
Offline Offline

Location: Londonderry, NH, USA
Joined: Dec 12, 2000
Posts: 51134
"Almost Professional"


View Profile
« Reply #3 on: Oct 12, 2017, 02:39PM »

I like to find an older retailer with a "box o' mouthpieces" usually for cheap.  I would buy interesting ones.  First thing you need to do is to decide if you want a bigger or a smaller mouthpiece.  Make a change and go from there.  Note that you need a couple of weeks at least to test out a mouthpiece.  There is a honeymoon period, then a period where nothing seems to work, and finally an alignment of you and the mouthpiece.

Now if you want to do this scientifically, a session with Doug Elliott or Dave Wilken can shorten the search.  They can analyze your embouchure and make suggestions for mouthpieces.
Logged

Bruce Guttman
Solo Trombone, Hollis Town Band
Merrimack Valley Philharmonic Orch. President 2017-2018
Steven

*
Offline Offline

Location: Bonistan, New York
Joined: Dec 12, 2007
Posts: 2324

View Profile
« Reply #4 on: Oct 12, 2017, 02:57PM »

Can you manage a trip to southern California?  Hornguys have plenty of mouthpieces to try.
Logged

Steven Cangemi
SilverBone
Put the Cool in "Coulisse!"

*
Online Online

Location: Portland, OR
Joined: Sep 16, 2006
Posts: 3828

View Profile
« Reply #5 on: Oct 13, 2017, 12:23AM »

When I was looking at changing, first I zeroed in on an approximate size that worked for me (I was helped in doing so by living near a mouthpiece maker).  Then I bought a bunch of cheap eBay mouthpieces in that size to decide which one I liked best.
Logged

-Howard

The nastiest fellow I've known
Smashed his trombone and ruined its tone.
There's a simple excuse
For his slush pump abuse:
He was born to be bad to the bone.
Geezerhorn

*
Offline Offline

Location: PA
Joined: Feb 9, 2012
Posts: 5557
"Lego My Trombone"


View Profile
« Reply #6 on: Oct 13, 2017, 05:29AM »

When I was looking at changing, first I zeroed in on an approximate size that worked for me (I was helped in doing so by living near a mouthpiece maker).  Then I bought a bunch of cheap eBay mouthpieces in that size to decide which one I liked best.

Yes.

I think it would be a most daunting task for me to walk into a music store or what-have-you and test all their mouthpieces. I would somehow want to narrow it down first or have that visit narrow it down to a few basic sizes. Then another trip to see what different cup shapes, bore/back-bore sizes did for me. Even then, it's almost using the shotgun approach.

For me, it can take months to properly eval a mouthpiece!

But if you are a very seasoned player with years and years on the horn, then you probably wouldn't even be posting a question about it b/c you would know what works and what doesn't and it would just be a matter of trying out a variation or two on what you are already using.

But best of luck to you! I just wouldn't expect an "ah-hah" moment or a light switch to get flipped and you find yourself suddenly sounding like a top pro b/c you found THE mouthpiece that was radically different from any you have ever tried before. I guess it can happen, but more likely it's a process.

...Geezer
Logged
boneagain
*
Offline Offline

Location: Richmond, VA
Joined: Aug 4, 2007
Posts: 2064

View Profile
« Reply #7 on: Oct 13, 2017, 05:45AM »

...
If you have the funds you can buy a few and send them back if they donít gel with you. Many makers have decent enough return policies. Just pay for shipping and they will refund the mouthpiece cost. 

Even if you COULD get to a festival, this might be the better option, if you are really serious.  As Geezer notes in a later post, it takes more than a few minutes to try a mouthpiece.  This is ESPECIALLY true in the bruhaha of a festival vendor area.

Your "soft machine" will adapt to almost anything.  Unless you play the mouthpiece for some number of days (that number depends entirely on the player and how easily they "give in" to new equipment) you will get many "false positives" and probably as many "false negatives." 

I have heard more than a few players come into ensembles with new mouthpieces (horns, valve covers, counterweights, bell wraps, etc. etc) and sound different the first week and then, after one or two more weeks, sound JUST like they did before, except that their endurance went down for a while.  It usually took a week or two after THAT to figure out if the endurance would get better than before, or worse, or the same. 

Best is a guided search with a good teacher or specialist like Elliott or Wilken as noted above.  But in any case, the most important element will be time.

Logged

Dave Adams
Staunch admirer of all who still make a living at this!
crazytrombonist505
*
Offline Offline

Location: West Chester, PA
Joined: Oct 13, 2016
Posts: 191

View Profile
« Reply #8 on: Oct 14, 2017, 05:56AM »

Used mouthpieces are usually found pretty cheap on eBay. Just buy up a bunch and resell the ones your don't like back on eBay. It has worked for me. Trombones, too!

...Geezer

You can also check out the classified add section here on the forum. Iíve have saved allot of money by buying mouthpieces here on the forum instead of paying the price to get them brand new. And as Geezer stated above, eBay is a good option too  Good!

Good luck!
Logged
Geezerhorn

*
Offline Offline

Location: PA
Joined: Feb 9, 2012
Posts: 5557
"Lego My Trombone"


View Profile
« Reply #9 on: Oct 14, 2017, 06:03AM »

You can also check out the classified add section here on the forum. Iíve have saved allot of money by buying mouthpieces here on the forum instead of paying the price to get them brand new. And as Geezer stated above, eBay is a good option too  Good!

Good luck!

 Good!

If you stay off the BIN button and can win the auction-ending bid, your chances of selling them back at the same or even a higher auction price is better.

...Geezer
Logged
vegasbound
There are 2 types of trombone player....Urbie & everyone else!

*
Offline Offline

Location:
Joined: Aug 2, 2008
Posts: 2529
"Get your tee shirt from http://www.derekwatkins.co"


View Profile
« Reply #10 on: Oct 14, 2017, 06:05AM »

Usual questions....  Why do you need a new mouthpiece.   What do you play on now?  What has your teacher suggested?   And finally save yourself time and dollars talk to DE
Logged

'There will never come a day when I don't need to practice'- JJ Johnson
Pre59

*
Offline Offline

Location: Devon UK
Joined: May 26, 2015
Posts: 582

View Profile
« Reply #11 on: Oct 14, 2017, 08:42AM »


Please let me know what suggestions you all have!



Leave well alone until you are driven by a tangible need, or come across a box of old mouthpieces one/some of which shows you a real benefit. That'll give you an idea of the dimensions that are good for you, and then with this experience you'll be able to make better choices when you're ready.
Logged

In my reality..
LowrBrass

*
Offline Offline

Location: Philadelphia-ish, PA
Joined: May 17, 2015
Posts: 391

View Profile
« Reply #12 on: Oct 14, 2017, 11:00AM »

Just a footnote in addition to everything else that's been said...

...I know I can ask fellow trombone players, but some aren't too fond of letting me test them.  :-P...

True, some aren't. But some are. Suss out the ones who are. You're not the only curious trombonist out there.
I just bummed borrowed a couple mouthpieces off a gearhead buddy this past Monday, which I'll be keeping for at least a month.
I lent out a 'piece last year to another buddy, and he loves it, and I've written it off as a permanent gift at this point.

Plus... I carry a spray bottle of "mouthpiece cleaner" (wintergreen alcohol) around with me.
If we're doing impromptu mouthpiece test swaps and if people care about germs, then I can clean the mouthpieces before and after so nobody gets squeamish.
(But most people I swap mouthpieces with don't seem to care about germs.)
Logged
jimkinkella
*
Offline Offline

Location:
Joined: Nov 26, 2008
Posts: 57

View Profile
« Reply #13 on: Oct 14, 2017, 12:00PM »

I haven't personally tried them, but these guys seem to have a pretty good trial policy:
http://www.mouthpieceexpress.com/catalog/returns.php?osCsid=t69lpf4du0k2tjvtsa4tjb1vb7
I'd hit everything with alcohol before and after trying.
Horn shopping is always a great excuse for a roadtrip!(whenever possible, of course)
Ebay and this forum are great places to pick up used pieces, and you can always turn them back out to the wild if they don't work.
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
Print
Jump to: