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Author Topic: Study: earplugs for everyone  (Read 2014 times)
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Torobone

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« Reply #40 on: Nov 26, 2017, 04:47AM »

A long time ago I got into a habit that I think has saved my hearing.  I wear earplugs AFTER the gig, driving home.  That allows recovery time, which is effective.

I found early in my career with a rock band that I would listen to music on the way to rehearsal but I would turn it off on the way home.

I believe a study I heard many years ago that it takes 8 times longer for the ear to recover from the duration of a loud noise.

Also, symphony musicians seem to suffer greater hearing loss from high frequency instruments like piccolos and violins than from loud instruments like tympani and trombones. It might be safer to be a rock musician provided the duration can be controlled.

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« Reply #41 on: Nov 26, 2017, 07:05AM »

A long time ago I got into a habit that I think has saved my hearing.  I wear earplugs AFTER the gig, driving home.  That allows recovery time, which is effective.

Wow, why haven't I tried this? This sounds like a great idea!  Good!
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« Reply #42 on: Nov 26, 2017, 10:42AM »

First off, I think some of us are overestimating the volume of a symphony orchestra.


You are correct when speak about duration being a bigger factor than volume. The district I work in has a full time audiologist. We are are requiry to have our hearing checked every year. I have also had state L&I officials follow me for a day.  The levels I experience are much higher than what is recommended, but because of the large amounts of time between classes (Itinerate elementary band) it is evened out. BTW, the person from the state recommend that I do exactly what Doug does; keep things quiet in the other areas of your life.
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« Reply #43 on: Nov 26, 2017, 01:29PM »

I have a set of decent earplugs that I wear when in situations that require it, mostly big band rehearsals/gigs. They change my sound perception enough that I don't wear it unless its absolutely necessary, so I only put them on when the charts call for the ridiculous lead trumpet fireworks, or if the trumpet player somehow ends up with his bell 3/4 in away from my ear.

I only started wearing them after an incident where our university big band had to play in a bar setting crammed into a corner... A loud lead trumpet soli came and I felt a short sharp stinging pain in my ear for half a second and then my ears were ringing after the gig. I did what Doug did and as soon as I got off the gig, I went home and went straight to sleep in complete silence. That seemed to have helped. My hearing tests are still as good as they were before the incident, so I think maybe that had something to do with it (although I didn't realize it at the time).

I would like to try the "hearing aids with a limiter" at some point to see how effective those are for myself.
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« Reply #44 on: Nov 27, 2017, 01:37AM »

A long time ago I got into a habit that I think has saved my hearing.  I wear earplugs AFTER the gig, driving home.  That allows recovery time, which is effective.

I almost never wear earplugs on a gig, but I've been experimenting with some options.  Etymotic makes some electronic "earplugs" that I like.  They're more like hearing aids with a limiter.  Everything sounds almost normal at lower volume or even for conversation, but at increased volume it still sounds the same, not louder.  The perception of your own sound is closer to normal than it is with regular earplugs.

https://www.etymotic.com/consumer/hearing-protection/mp915.html

They're not cheap but it's better than losing your hearing, and I like them a lot better than earplugs.

Thanks for sharing, Doug. These plugs are fascinating! For bands that cover a wide dynamic range (i.e. not simply a loud rock band) these sounds like a good concept. Given the expense, I'll do a little more homework, but I'm tempted.

Andrew
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Doug Elliott
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« Reply #45 on: Nov 27, 2017, 01:43AM »

They do use hearing aid batteries, and there's no real convenient way to save the batteries when you're not using them except to to open the battery compartments between uses.  I find it nearly impossible to handle those tiny batteries.
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« Reply #46 on: Dec 03, 2017, 03:58AM »

Talking about hearing, I'm reading a book at the moment by Len Beadell.  Len was a Government surveyor who in the late 1940s and 1950s, surveyed and supervised the construction of the first roads through the desert country in the centre of Australia to Western Australia.  The requirement for this road construction was partly driven by the British and Australian Government's plan to construct a rocket range at Woomera in South Australia.

Once the location for the rocket range had been decided, an airstrip was constructed and supplies for the road and construction crews were flown in by DC3.

In the course of construction of the roads, Len met a few groups of Aboriginal people who had not had previous contact with Europeans and others who had recently come into contact with cattle men.

He mentions a few times how the Aboriginals knew a plane was approaching at least 10 minutes before anyone else was aware of it.

The author doesn't say so but I think this is because the Aboriginal's hearing at that time would have been unspoilt by contact with noisy machinery or for that matter, entertainment equipment.

Perhaps we don't realise how much of our aural sensitivity has been lost simply due to the western lifestyle.

Just a thought.

 
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Doug Elliott
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« Reply #47 on: Dec 03, 2017, 06:56AM »

Well, yeah...

Hey, if a didgeridoo isn't "entertainment equipment," what is it?
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« Reply #48 on: Dec 03, 2017, 11:38AM »

Well, yeah...

Hey, if a didgeridoo isn't "entertainment equipment," what is it?


Ha!  So true.

Played rock gig last night that was so loud I had to put in earplugs just to hear myself.  With a monitor!
It was top 5 on my loudest gigs list😂. 

The plugs saved my hearing......

DD
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« Reply #49 on: Dec 04, 2017, 05:09AM »

Well, yeah...

Hey, if a didgeridoo isn't "entertainment equipment," what is it?

That's a pretty good classification for it.

You couldn't call it loud when played in its natural setting.

In the context I mentioned previously, that would have been the loudest man made sound that they were subjected to.
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