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The Trombone ForumHorns, Gear, and EquipmentInstruments(Moderators: tbone62, Greg Waits) Axials Vs Rotors Is it Really Worth It?
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Dan Hine

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« Reply #60 on: Dec 02, 2017, 03:51AM »

You didnt start anything. No one did  :D it got a little weird but i think thats just the internet.

On that we agree 100%!

Some people just got kind of defensive when I mentioned part of an axial that I dont believe is a disadvantage.

If you're referring to me, I didn't mean to seem defensive, rather I just wanted to offer further explanation.  You can like what you like and believe what you believe - that doesn't bother me one bit.   Good!

Oh yeah I forgot about the "anything but axials" quote.
I dont understand that. How is that different from saying "anything but rotor valves"? Neither is particularly helpful or constructive.

It seemed to me that the OP was asking for an opinion on the topic "Axials vs Rotors."  I provided mine.  Don't like them and never have.  Yes, I could have made a 4 paragraph post on why.  Would that really matter?  Not in my opinion because the OP has to try them for himself no matter what I, your, or anybody else says.  Because some people do like them and sound amazing!

Adrian, play your axial valves dude.  You sound great!  I'm going to enjoy my rotors.  On my second Holton 180.  Which I prefer to every axial valve bass trombone I have ever played.  It's ok to have different opinions.  At the end of the day, just remember that (most?) everyone posting here lives in a 1st world country, has high speed internet, and is talking about trombones.  Is it really worth getting upset?  Not one bit.   Good!

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savio

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« Reply #61 on: Dec 02, 2017, 03:53AM »

With my limited knowledge, isnt there one more option? The valves that looks like rotors but are much bigger? Dont know the name on them? I could see Denson Paul Pollard had this valves on his trombone.

Anyway, regular rotors works ok when you get used to them, I suppose also axials do that?

Leif   
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Bass Trombone - Conn, Holton
Dan Hine

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« Reply #62 on: Dec 02, 2017, 04:09AM »

With my limited knowledge, isnt there one more option? The valves that looks like rotors but are much bigger? Dont know the name on them? I could see Denson Paul Pollard had this valves on his trombone.

Anyway, regular rotors works ok when you get used to them, I suppose also axials do that?

Leif   

Yes, there are many options.  Dr. Pollard uses Hagmann valves.  Shires Trubore valves are nice too.  And many versions of the standard rotor.  Plenty of good options.
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bonecat
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« Reply #63 on: Jan 02, 2018, 12:09AM »

This discussion could go on forever. I agree with those above who state that it depends on the horn and the player. If you don't over-oil an axial, it shouldn't degrade/contaminate your slide lube. Dave Taylor, Joseph Alessi, Blair Bollinger and others of their caliber play axials. It doesn't mean they are better or not. It's a matter of taste.
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svenlarsson

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« Reply #64 on: Jan 02, 2018, 03:32AM »

This discussion could go on forever. I agree with those above who state that it depends on the horn and the player. If you don't over-oil an axial, it shouldn't degrade/contaminate your slide lube. Dave Taylor, Joseph Alessi, Blair Bollinger and others of their caliber play axials. It doesn't mean they are better or not. It's a matter of taste.
Well Dave Taylor have horns both with axial valves and without. Joseph Alessi have played rotor valves a lot some years. I think it has ben said many times on this thread it is a matter of taste, but also the difference could be that in some situations you would chose axials but sometimes you chose rotors. So it is actually impossible to answer the question if axials are worth it. Try for your self. Many do change their minds after some years though.
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Pre59

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« Reply #65 on: Jan 02, 2018, 07:48AM »

Does one type of valve favour being able to sustain very low notes over another?
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svenlarsson

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« Reply #66 on: Jan 02, 2018, 08:32AM »

Does one type of valve favour being able to sustain very low notes over another?
In my experience a good rotor favour sustained low tones over axial. The axial valve favour bigger sound though.
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Kanstul 1662. Bach 45B. Kanstul 1555. Besson Euphonium. Kanstul 66-S Tuba. Sackbuts in F/E/Eb Bb/A
And several horns I should sell.
Matt K

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« Reply #67 on: Jan 02, 2018, 09:07AM »

I believe I've mentioned this elsewhere in this thread, but it seems to depend on the rest of the setup.  I've played on variations of horns with both types of valves that would make playing sustained notes easier or more difficult. I'm using a Shires with axials right now that is far easier to sustain notes at any dynamic level than the Duo Gravis I was playing on for the last year or so. If rotors were a major contributor, you'd think the Duo Gravis would be the idea subject with it having 562 sized rotors.
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Pre59

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« Reply #68 on: Jan 02, 2018, 09:36AM »

In my experience a good rotor favour sustained low tones over axial. The axial valve favour bigger sound though.

If I still played bass, I'd go for slightly leaner lower notes if it meant a little more sustain. Rotors were the only option available at the time.
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schlitzbeer
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« Reply #69 on: Jan 02, 2018, 12:19PM »

Im interested in purchasing an axial valve for my current horn, a Shires Q series that has a rotary valve.  I've never tried any other type of valve but I know that there are definitely differences in valve types.  And within the next month I am going locally to try out the Axial, and obviously that will decide on whether I purchase or not.  But in the meantime Im wondering, to you, what is the real difference between the two and why do/would you choose one over the other?

I donít like axials. I prefer rotaries based upon the added weight on my left hand. The main consideration is the sound being collaborative with the other members of my group, or ensemble. Secondary to that would be how taxing it is versus the sound output, and does my audience appreciate the difference. So I have a .547 rotary tenor and a single rotor bass. Iím not going to play or buy a horn that is uncomfortable to play. On durability, Iíll stick with rotaries. As for which rotaries Iíd prefer, count me in for Olsen valves. If you become set on buying an axial, better look at Mikeís axial valve too.
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