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Author Topic: Slide Off Between Use  (Read 672 times)
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Wasatch Oz

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« on: Dec 04, 2017, 09:24PM »

Between practice, I keep my trombones on bell stands. I empty them first, but know condensation will still collect in the slide crook. Lately I've been removing the slide. The thinking is that it should dry it out faster. And should create less chance of any possible metal deterioration --and anything being able to begin growing.

Has anyone else done, or considered doing this?

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Burgerbob

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« Reply #1 on: Dec 04, 2017, 10:16PM »

I wouldn't so much worry about water in the crook, unless you're leaving them there for REALLY long times with a lot of condensation around.

I usually just have the horn lying down so the slide lube doesn't all run off the slide as fast.
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Blowero

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« Reply #2 on: Dec 04, 2017, 10:47PM »

I suspect it would be better to have the outer slide in a vertical position so that moisture runs down into the crook rather than causing corrosion in the straight tubes that could adversely affect slide action. So if you do take off the outer slide, you might want to consider standing it up or hanging it vertically.
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Burgerbob

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« Reply #3 on: Dec 04, 2017, 11:14PM »

Didn't think of that!

The crook is the easier part to replace, after all.
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john sandhagen
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« Reply #4 on: Dec 05, 2017, 07:07AM »

IMO if you play every day you are actually making the slide more vulnerable by making both the bell and the slide seperate targets for your cat, brother, roomate etc. If the horn (for instance doublers) sits for a couple of weeks until it's needed, then drying it would be a better option.

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Wasatch Oz

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« Reply #5 on: Dec 05, 2017, 08:33AM »

I wouldn't so much worry about water in the crook, unless you're leaving them there for REALLY long times with a lot of condensation around.

I usually just have the horn lying down so the slide lube doesn't all run off the slide as fast.

Right. Makes sense. I was thinking it would hang on my wall, upside down so any moisture would run out. Upside down inner slide might actually get any moving lubricant to run back up the inner slide.

I suspect it would be better to have the outer slide in a vertical position so that moisture runs down into the crook rather than causing corrosion in the straight tubes that could adversely affect slide action. So if you do take off the outer slide, you might want to consider standing it up or hanging it vertically.

Yeah, hanging straight up or down was the idea and makes the most sense. I think the upside down idea has merit. Anything that can drain, will drain out. The rest would dry as usual.

IMO if you play every day you are actually making the slide more vulnerable by making both the bell and the slide seperate targets for your cat, brother, roomate etc. If the horn (for instance doublers) sits for a couple of weeks until it's needed, then drying it would be a better option.

Yeah, this though occurred to me. I'm lucky in that my kids are older and the cat has crossed the rainbow bridge. For a long-term solution, I'm considering a wall peg that the slide would hang on, out of the way. The horn sits on the stand as usual. But this is a valid concern. While the risk is low in my circumstance, it does double the chances of something happening.
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Wasatch Oz

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« Reply #6 on: Dec 05, 2017, 09:03AM »

I received a nice email from someone on this topic. I won't mention a name since it seems that they didn't want to bring it up in the forum.

But there's some good merit to their point, which I hadn't considered. The lubricants (even though they are petroleum based) can and will oxidize / dry out. Solvents will evaporate. When a slide is on, there is less oxygen exchange so this is reduced.

Everything in life has trade offs. This is another one to consider, which I had not. *Maybe* there is benefit to letting the slide condensation evaporate between use, but it will require more frequent cleanings and re-lubrication.
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JohnL
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« Reply #7 on: Dec 05, 2017, 11:12AM »

Corrosion is not the only concern. You also have to think about buildup from solids left behind when the lubricant, condensate, and (let's be honest) spit evaporate. Using distilled or deionized water rather than tap water in your spray bottle helps, but some of whatever is in your mouth ends up in your horn, and whatever is in your mouth is what forms the tartar the dentist has to scrap off of you teeth every six months.

At the very least, you should wipe off the outers and swab out the outers (the Slide-O-Mix sleeved cleaning rods are good for this). I go a little further and swab out the inners and the end crook.
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« Reply #8 on: Dec 10, 2017, 08:30AM »

When my oldest horn was about 25-30 years old I had a problem with corrosion in the outer slide. I was told it was not repairable. Even had a few holes though the metal. Since there was no chance of repair I went at it myself. I soaked the slide in diet cola and Brasso to get it clean. I lacquered the outside so it sealed the pinholes.
Since then I regularly clean my horns with vinegar and Dawn dish soap. Then flush them with water often.
Keep the horn cleaned, anything else is not enough.
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leec

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« Reply #9 on: Dec 14, 2017, 01:43PM »

I leave my horns on stands between plays and always take the slide off and stand it on a towel so it can drain.  My cats have never knocked them over.
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