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Author Topic: Mouthpiece/horn synergy  (Read 1801 times)
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Burgerbob

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« Reply #20 on: Dec 16, 2017, 06:56AM »

In the trumpet world, a lot of people talk about "gap", which I'm under the impression is the distance from the end of the shank to the start of the 'venturi' (and word I wish were 'venturus') of the leadpipe.
I guess we can assume that can be a factor with the 'bone too.

Trumpet leadpipes/recievers are much different than most trombones. The receiver is a separate entity from the leadpipe, so there is a step down to the leadpipe after the receiver and therefore a "gap" from the end of the mouthpiece to the start of the leadpipe.

On almost all trombones (minus Kings), the leadpipe IS a receiver.
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Stan

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« Reply #21 on: Dec 27, 2017, 06:01AM »


On almost all trombones (minus Kings), the leadpipe IS a receiver.

@Bob,

The Yamaha Nils Landgren piece Iíve got that triggered this line of thought has the thinnest shank of any production mouthpiece Iíve seen.  It thins to the same thickness as my leadpipe on the receiver-end, and I think that helps the piece meld with the pipe a little more easily.  Thereís not as much of an abrupt step in bore size between the mouthpiece venturi and the leadpipe.
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donn
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« Reply #22 on: Jan 14, 2018, 03:32PM »

I guess we can assume that can be a factor with the 'bone too.

Or maybe not.  I don't know a lot about trombone leadpipes, but I gather it's quite different from trumpet, or tuba with which I'm more familiar.


This diagram of a sort of typical tuba receiver shows the receiver in yellow, a sort of ferrule that accepts the mouthpiece shank on the left and the leadpipe (as tuba players call it) to the valves on the right.  The step labeled "shoulder" is what creates a "gap" -- if it exists.  The receiver and leadpipe bore could match (and I believe usually do), so the there isn't really a gap.  I might go so far as to say it might be kind of mythical.  Trumpet may be a different story.

I haven't extracted a trombone leadpipe myself, as I gather many here have, but it's evidently quite a different arrangement, and guaranteed not to have that feature.
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Doug Elliott
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« Reply #23 on: Jan 14, 2018, 03:43PM »

And a lot of tubas don't have that feature either, in fact many are the opposite with the leadpipe starting at a larger diameter than the receiver.
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