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Author Topic: Staccato Tonguing  (Read 387 times)
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Hamp Bone
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« on: Dec 23, 2017, 11:37PM »

I am a returning trombone player after a 42 yr layoff. My question is what is the best syllable to use when staccato tonguing? Should you use Tah or Tot?

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Doug Elliott
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« Reply #1 on: Dec 23, 2017, 11:52PM »

In general, use a T to start the note but not to stop it.  But it sort of depends on the speed and other circumstances.
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« Reply #2 on: Dec 24, 2017, 08:16AM »

Tongueless release is the standard in classical style, for the most part. One notable non-classical style where a tongue cutoff would be OK is in funk, where using a tongue cutoff at the end of a quick sequence of sixteenth notes makes the last note sound the same as the preceding notes, because starting the next note necessarily cuts off the previous note anyway.


But, for someone who is "re-starting" I would think that extreme emphasis on a tongueless release is better, because it forces you to keep your embouchure stable.
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Hamp Bone
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« Reply #3 on: Dec 24, 2017, 02:49PM »

Thanks
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baileyman
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« Reply #4 on: Dec 31, 2017, 04:20PM »

In general, use a T to start the note but not to stop it.  But it sort of depends on the speed and other circumstances.

A buddy who played in the late 50s Kenton band is adamant about stopping staccato by stopping breath.  He states that these notes should ring a bit.  But the tongue stops the ring. 

What I observe is that the "ut" stop is a definitive time event.  It's easy to hear these things happen.  Since everyone seems to have a different idea about how they should be done, they then happen at slightly different times in a section.  Then you get a note termination mess. 

Individually, though in solo, go to town.  Terminations can be super expressive.  Listen to Fontana for example. 

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