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The Trombone ForumCreation and PerformanceMusic, Concerts and Recordings(Moderator: BGuttman) A new Concerto for trombone and full orchestra
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Author Topic: A new Concerto for trombone and full orchestra  (Read 355 times)
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« on: Jan 04, 2018, 07:41AM »

Hello!
Finally, I can announce that a new Concerto for trombone and full orchestra available. Here is the link https://alexeykaleynikov.musicaneo.com/sheetmusic/sm-320808_concerto_for_trombone_and_full_orchestra__score_and_trombone_solo_part.html   where you can see some pages of the score and the trombone solo (partially), and also download the entire score and the trombone solo part. A good demo-audio available also. You can listen to 1st and 2nd movements of the concert.
A few words about this concert. This concert was composed by Russian composer Vladimir Kouptsov at my request. He has composed it very quickly - within August - September 2017. I started working on the score and recorded (audio) 1st and 2nd  movements  of the concert. I have made the sheet music to publish and I was going to record 3rd movement also. I'm not a professional trombone player, and when I received the order for manufacturing something else, I was forced to abandon the idea to record the whole concert. At the moment, I can offer the score (116 pages). Trombone part (13 pages). Mp3 file solo trombone and full orchestra. 1st and 2nd movements of the concert. You can imagine the style, tempos and so on. The Author approved performing. I find that the concert is very difficult to perform. I'm sure that not every trombonist is able to perform this music well. I also think that this is a very interesting new major work for trombone, which does not often appear. Feel free, if you want to ask any question relevant to this concert. I am available here often. Thank you all in advance!
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Doug Elliott
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« Reply #1 on: Jan 04, 2018, 08:10AM »

Very nice.  I listened to the 1st movement but didn't see where to hear the 2nd movement.

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« Reply #2 on: Jan 04, 2018, 08:21AM »

Very nice.  I listened to the 1st movement but didn't see where to hear the 2nd movement.




Thanks for interest! The 1st movement is 00-05'21". The second movement is 05'22" up to the end of the record. The 3rd movement begins "attaca" also.
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« Reply #3 on: Jan 05, 2018, 12:26AM »

This is quite nice.  If a professional recording of it becomes available, let us know!
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« Reply #4 on: Jan 05, 2018, 05:47AM »

I don't mean this in a condescending way, but I think what I heard of this piece is really very pretty!  I think the average audience member would identify this music as Russian--it just has that feel and sound to it.

Now again, I don't want to sound uninformed, but could this piece be performed successfully on either tenor OR bass trombone?

I'd love to hear this live!  Thank your friend for writing this piece!
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« Reply #5 on: Jan 05, 2018, 07:08AM »

Love it. Want to play it. The price is kind of steep.

One thing that gave me a chuckle was the license that comes with it for unlimited performance rights for a year. In general, if you're a publisher with ASCAP or the equivalent association from your home country, the venue where the piece is performed pays ASCAP the standard rate for performance royalties. And maybe you as the publisher will get paid eventually if the royalties add up to enough to warrant writing you a check. And that's if the venue is doing things correctly. It's not on the performer to clear rights or get licenses for live performances, unless the performer is also the organization that runs the venue. If anything, including that license is an excuse for venues to NOT pay you performance royalties if and when the piece is performed in public. You could have charged $120 and not included the license, increasing the chances of getting royalties for performances. It's published, so now whether or not it can be performed in public is out of your hands. If you are not registered with ASCAP, BMI, SESAC, etc, then you control performance rights. You may still also still have dibs on who gets to record it first. Though... perhaps not for mvt 1 and 2, since you've made them available.
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« Reply #6 on: Jan 05, 2018, 08:48AM »

It's a promising piece, but I will note that the moments I remember most after having heard it are not the ones the trombone part created.

That seems like a strategic error for a concerto.

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« Reply #7 on: Jan 05, 2018, 09:10AM »

Love it. Want to play it. The price is kind of steep.

One thing that gave me a chuckle was the license that comes with it for unlimited performance rights for a year. In general, if you're a publisher with ASCAP or the equivalent association from your home country, the venue where the piece is performed pays ASCAP the standard rate for performance royalties. And maybe you as the publisher will get paid eventually if the royalties add up to enough to warrant writing you a check. And that's if the venue is doing things correctly. It's not on the performer to clear rights or get licenses for live performances, unless the performer is also the organization that runs the venue. If anything, including that license is an excuse for venues to NOT pay you performance royalties if and when the piece is performed in public. You could have charged $120 and not included the license, increasing the chances of getting royalties for performances. It's published, so now whether or not it can be performed in public is out of your hands. You may still have dibs on who gets to record it first, though.

We are an orchestra and not a venue but we pay ASCAP for all copyright pieces we play (that they control).  In general our venues demand we pay the royalties..

Also, royalty fees are often adjusted for the size of the organization.  The Boston Symphony, with its multimillion dollar budget, pays a MUCH bigger royalty than we do with our $50,000 budget.

That said, going thrugh ASCAP, BMI, etc. is a good way to let them figure out who has to pay and making sure you get your royalties.

Good luck.
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« Reply #8 on: Jan 05, 2018, 09:25AM »

We are an orchestra and not a venue but we pay ASCAP for all copyright pieces we play (that they control).  In general our venues demand we pay the royalties..

Also, royalty fees are often adjusted for the size of the organization.  The Boston Symphony, with its multimillion dollar budget, pays a MUCH bigger royalty than we do with our $50,000 budget.

That said, going thrugh ASCAP, BMI, etc. is a good way to let them figure out who has to pay and making sure you get your royalties.

Good luck.
Love it. Want to play it. The price is kind of steep.

One thing that gave me a chuckle was the license that comes with it for unlimited performance rights for a year. In general, if you're a publisher with ASCAP or the equivalent association from your home country, the venue where the piece is performed pays ASCAP the standard rate for performance royalties. And maybe you as the publisher will get paid eventually if the royalties add up to enough to warrant writing you a check. And that's if the venue is doing things correctly. It's not on the performer to clear rights or get licenses for live performances, unless the performer is also the organization that runs the venue. If anything, including that license is an excuse for venues to NOT pay you performance royalties if and when the piece is performed in public. You could have charged $120 and not included the license, increasing the chances of getting royalties for performances. It's published, so now whether or not it can be performed in public is out of your hands. You may still have dibs on who gets to record it first, though.

Yes, it is my experience in Canada that the producer pays royalties to ou equivalent of ASCAP, not the venue itself. E.g. if the venue is also a producer and organizes a season, they take care of royalties of the shows they produce, but they don't take care of that for external rentals of the venue.

In any case I agree with Harrison that this kind of licensing is rather strange.

Also, the composer usually gets dibs on who performs the live premiere as well, not just recordings.
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« Reply #9 on: Jan 05, 2018, 09:40AM »

Thank you all for the discussion!
I watch carefully. We discuss with the composer the question of licensing. Soon we will make a decision about it. In any case, we are interested in the frequent performance of the Concerto.We do not intend to do everything too difficult.
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« Reply #10 on: Jan 05, 2018, 12:01PM »

Actually, I looked into it some more, and I was wrong -- if you are not a part of ASCAP/BMI/SESAC, or your country's equivalent organization, then only you can grant rights for public performance, like the license you include probably allows for. In this case, only the copyright holder can grant performance rights. I'm correcting my previous post. I am used to the ASCAP system, where your music is added to their repertory when it is registered and is available for public performance so long as the venue has a blanket ASCAP license and they report up to ASCAP what songs were performed.

Now, the subject which I have done much more research on and am more well informed on is recording and mechanical licenses. You as the copyright holder are entitled to the first recording rights, and you can grant these rights to others for the premiere recording or record yourself. However, once the work is recorded and made available publically, then anyone can record their own "arrangement" and you no longer have control over who can record it or not, at least in the USA. This is covered in the USA under the "compulsory mechanical license" law. The way that works is that they hear the recording, make their own arrangement (or use your sheet music, obviously) and record it. They then write you a letter saying they are recording your music, and they pay you 9.1 cents per recording made (more if the track is longer than 5 minutes), paid to you quarterly. You can't say no, at least if the music was made available in the USA. If their version changes the basic melody, or the actual structure of the music, then you can say that it is an illegal arrangement, but otherwise it's all fair game.

I thought that printed music worked this way as well -- you made the music available, so now anyone can perform it live as long as they pay you -- but I was wrong. If you register with ASCAP for automatic coverage under venue licenses, etc, then that is the case, otherwise it is not. So sorry I put out bad info about these tricky laws.
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"My technique is as good as Initial D"
T-396A - Griego 1C
88HTCL - Griego 1C
36H - DE XT105, C+, D Alto Shank
3B/F Silversonic - Griego 1A ss
pBone (with Yellow bell for bright tone)
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