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Author Topic: Haydn Concerto for two trombones  (Read 142 times)
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Cappelgren
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« on: Jan 06, 2018, 03:48PM »

Hi there!
I stumbled across a recording of Michael Haydn´s concerto for two trombones in D major: https://open.spotify.com/track/0Bjqhm02sYWPH6bgvVziKT
Though, I can't find any info about it or find sheet music or such. Even if it is just an adaption of another work I would be really grateful if someone of you could help me figure out what piece it is so I can make that adaption as well in that case...  :D
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Cappelgren
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« Reply #1 on: Jan 06, 2018, 03:53PM »

Never mind, I figured it out myself... The concerto was written for horn and trombone. But wow, it sounds good on two altos as well!!
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Le.Tromboniste
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« Reply #2 on: Jan 06, 2018, 07:07PM »

It is not a concerto.

Michael Haydn, Serenade in D Major P.87, movements 4 and 5 (out of 10 movements). There is one more movement with the trombone, which is a recitativo where all the soloists of the serenade have a few phrases to play. The whole serenade is actually a very nice piece and shows some unity - it is a very prime example of the Salzburg 18th century evening music pieces. Unlike the more familiar Haydn piece and the Leopold Mozart, the two movements with solo trombone actually do work satisfactorily as a stand-alone "concerto" (and it is no coincidence thay they were in fact conceived as a concertino and labeled as such in the score, are two consecutive movements rather than isolated movements put together a posteriori, and has the trombone and horn labeled "concertato")

There are two editions available on the market. One is Schott (labeled as "Concertino for 2 horns (or horn and alto trombone)" - clearly they thought there would be more market for it as a horn piece), the other I can't remember. Neither is particularly great (lots of liberties taken with the articulations, and some dynamics which are not original, and the suggested cadences are ludicrous).

There is a scholarly edition of the whole serenade, although it too has some issues. No parts or performance material available, just the score.

I have made an Urtext edition (score and parts) of just the concertino. Yet to be published.
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Maximilien Brisson
Le.Tromboniste
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« Reply #3 on: Jan 06, 2018, 07:54PM »

That recording is not bad but is somewhat conflicted. The soloists make an appreciable effort to sound stylistically appropriate. The orchestra (or the mix) is a bit on the heavy side (especially the basses) and the sound in general is fairly wide and massive, and the violins' vibrato is a big distraction to me and a bad fit. The candenzas are kind of hilariously modern and out of style - especially compared to how the soloists manage to not sound too modern in the written music. There is also a big contrast between the complicity you can hear between the two soloists and their very varied dynamic and stylistic palette on one hand and the complicity (or lack thereof) between them and the orchestra or within the orchestra and the general evenness and lack of imagination in the accompaniment. In general it all sounds very clean and polished, but not extremely interesting.

For a recording on modern instruments, the best is probably Jasper de Waal and Jorgen van Rijen with the Concertgebouw Chamber Orchestra. Really stellar playing from the soloists (as one would expect from those two names!), world-class orchestra which displays amazing flexibility and really participates in the piece instead of just playing the notes and providing the accompaniment. The cadenzas are quite effective, written by Herman Jeurissen (Het Residentie Orkest Den Haag, and teacher in Den Haag and Amsterdam). And of course being with a major label, the recording is premium quality, all very clear, transparent and well balanced.

There is a lovely recording on historical instruments by the Salzburger Hofmusik as part of their Michael Haydn wind concertos series. The sound is interesting and more authentic (natural horn makes a big difference). Tempo for the adagio makes it hard to keep interested but the allegro is really exciting. Recording quality doesn't quite honor the quality of the playing though.
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Maximilien Brisson
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